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Publication numberUS3473648 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 21, 1969
Filing dateMay 4, 1967
Priority dateMay 4, 1967
Publication numberUS 3473648 A, US 3473648A, US-A-3473648, US3473648 A, US3473648A
InventorsPaluzzi Guirino W
Original AssigneePaluzzi Guirino W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Car-key/coin holder
US 3473648 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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' INVENTOR GUIRINO W. PALUZZI "III/IIIII/I/II/II/I/II/ United States Patent (1.8. Ci. 206.81 2 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates to a combination car-key/ coin holder which will hold keys in a readily available position and will hold coins for use during emergencies.

This invention relates to a new and improved car-key/ coin holding device for retaining keys and holding coins of the correct denomination for use during emergencies; and a device which is durable, attractive, easy, and inexpensive to fabricate.

The convenience of having coins ready and available for use during emergencies should be apparent to those who have the use of a ear-key carrying device.

This invention permits a motorist to have at hand a small number of coins. Although these coins are easily and readily available for use, because of the feature built into this invention the few seconds required to remove the coins will normally discourage the indiscriminate and random use thereof. The car-key/coin holder will primarily be used as a key holder, with the knowledge and assurance that the few coins will be available if they are ever needed.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a new and useful combination car-key/coin retainer.

A further object of this invention is to provide a two piece device for holding keys and coins, the coins retained within the interior of a sheath member by means of a spring retainer on which the keys are fastened. The coins may be removed or inserted by applying finger pressure on the retainer spring thereby releasing the retainer spring from the retainer spring stops, and sliding the retainer spring out of the sheath.

Another object of this invention is to provide a twopiece device for holding keys and coins. The coins are retained within the interior of a sheath member by means of a coin tray frictionally held in place and secured by a beaded key chain or other appropriate securing means.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a novel car-key/coin holder article characterized by a rectangular box-like shape with flat surfaces which permit the printing, engraving or embossing of the users name, address, telephone number, or any other information or message thereon.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a novel car-key/coin holder with a hair-pin design type retainer spring,

These and other objects are considered to be within the scope of this invention.

These and other objects are considered to be within the scope of this invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the car-key/ coin holder.

FIG. 2 is a front view of the embodiment of the carkey/ coin holder of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a cross section view taken along line AA of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of another embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 5 is a front view of the embodiment of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a cross section view taken along line B-B of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a detail view of the retainer spring hook.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of another embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 9 .is a side view of the embodiment of FIG. 8 showing the sleeve without the spring retainer to better show the details.

FIG. 10 is a cross section view taken along lines C--C of FIG. 9.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of another embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 12 is a perspective exploded view of the embodiment of FIG. 11.

FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional detail view of the coin tray taken along line D-D of FIG. 12.

FIG. 14 is a side view of the embodiment of FIG. 11.

FIG. 15 is a cross-sectional view of FIG. 14 taken along line E-E thereof.

FIG. 15A is a cross-sectional view showing basically the same embodiment as in FIGS. 11-15 but with a reverse tapered coin tray slide and a half round slot cut out of the sheath.

FIG. 16 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the instant invention.

FIG. 17 is a front view of the embodiment of FIG. 16.

FIG. 18 is a cross-sectional view of FIG. 17 taken along line F-F thereof.

In the drawings, a car-key/coin holder device, shown in FIGS. l-3, is of such design as to hold both keys and coins. The coins are held in the sheath 1 by means of a retainer spring 2 which is held in a fixed position by a burr or extended portion 3 extending into recess 4 in the side wall of the sheath 1. Keys are held on the outer portion 5 of the retainer spring 2 while coins are held inside the sheath 1. By depressing the extended portion 3, at the semi-circle slot 6, the retainer spring 2 may be slidably disengaged from the sheath 1, thereby releasing the coins for the use of the operator. To insert the coins, the retainer spring 2 is depressed at the semi-circular cut-away area 6 and the retainer spring 2 is pulled outwardly enough to permit the inserting of the coins and the attaching of the keys.

The sheath 1 may be extruded or fabricated into two parts and then fused or cemented together to form the housing of the car-key/coin holder device. The sheath may be made of practically any material within the skill of the art, while a plastic material may be selected in order to give the desired results in regards to color, weight and economical production thereof. The thickness of the sheath may be determined by the size and number of coins which one wishes to accommodate therein.

The retainer spring 2 is referably formed of stainless steel or bronze but may be formed from other suitable materials. The size of the car-key/coin holder is such that it would not be easily misplaced in a womans purse and not so large as to be cumbersome when carried in ones pocket.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 4-7 the retainer spring has a burr or extended portion 3 on each end of the retainer spring 2, said extended portions holding the retainer spring 2 in place by being engaged in the recess or slots 4. The retainer spring 2 may be depressed on both sides of the sheath 1 at the semi-circular secondary stops 6 in order to remove the retainer spring from the slots 4 and slide said spring out of the sheath 1. The eye 7 of the retainer spring 2 is of such design as to provide additional strength to the spring 2. The coins and keys are placed in the sheath or on the retainer spring in a similar manner as set forth with the embodiment above. The burrs or extended portions 3 are disengaged from the slots 4 by pressing or squeezing the retainer spring 2 at the twosemi-circular secondary stops 6. The retainer spring 2 may be slid outwardly until the extended portions 3 engage the 3 wall of the sheath 1 at the two semi-circular secondary stops 6. It is not necessary to remove the keys from the retainer spring 2 in order to remove the coins from the sheath.

In the embodiment of FIGS. 8-10, the sheath 1 has one side opening 8 through which coins may be inserted and a stop member 9 about which the hair-pin design type retainer spring 10 is held securely in place. The retainer spring 10 is of such design as to have an extended portion 11 which will prevent coins from passing through the opening 8 when the spring is in the closed position; The keys are held on the large loop portion of the retainer spring 10. By pulling the retainer spring 10, the extended portion 11 will clear the opening 8, thereby allowing coins to be removed or inserted, or keys to be placed on or removed from the retainer spring.

The embodiment of FIGS. 11-15A illustrates a different type coin retainer device. The sheath 1 is of such design as to allow a slide coin tray 12 to be placed inside, thereby holding coins in slots 13 in a unique manner. The coin tray is securely held in place by a beaded chain or other appropriate key securing means and by friction when the tapered coin tray piece reaches its slide limit and the three holes are aligned. The coins may be inserted or removed by unfastening the bead chain or other appropriate key securing means and releasing the friction grip by applying pressure and pushing inwardly on the protruding semi-round end of the car-key/coin tray or as in the reverse taper device FIG. 15A by pushing inwardly on the coin tray end opposite of the half round portion exposed at the half round slot of the sheath. The proper friction pressure is obtained when all the holes in the key securing means are in alignment. The sheath may be molded or formed in a two piece assembly as shown in FIG. 12. The base portion 15 has a coin slot area which is covered by top portion 16. An eye 17 is formed through the top portion 16, base portion 15, and slide 12 so as to fit in the proper relationship in order to be firmly held by friction, bead chain 14 or other appropriate securing means.

In order to remove or insert coins from the car-key/coin holder device the bead chain or other appropriate key securing means is detached or removed and the friction held coin slide tray 12 is released by pressing and pushing inwardly on the protruding semi-round end of the coin tray 12. Coins may then be replaced or withdrawn from the slide 12.

In the embodiment of FIGS. 16-18 a simple sheath 1 is illustrated wherein coins are retained by a bead chain 14 across the single opening of the sheath. A spacer 19 is held securely between the side of the sheath in order to better hold the coins in place. The spacer 19 also serves to strengthen the end of the sheath wherein the chain 14 is held. The eye 20 holds the chain 14 as is readily apparent within the skill of the art. In order to insert or remove coins or keys, the bead chain is removed and then the spacer 19 is removed. The coins are then easily removed or replaced. The keys are attached to the chain and the chain is then inserted through the eye 20 and spacer 19.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new is:

1. A key and coin holder comprising a sheath member for holding coins therein and a retainer device for securing said coins, said sheath member having a tapered slot whereby a slide coin tray is slidably engaged therein, said retainer device being a chain which is passed through openings aligned in the sheath and tray to prevent the remaining thereof by accident, said tray having slots to hold coins in a relatively fixed position, and said chain holding keys in a readily available position.

2. A key and coin holder comprising a sheath member for holding coins therein and a retainer device for securing said coins, said sheath member having a tapered slot whereby a tapered slide coin tray is slidably engaged therein and said tapered coin tray is held by a retainer device and by the friction of the tapered tray against the walls of the tapered slot, said retainer device being a chain which is passed through openings aligned in the sheath and tray to prevent the accidental removal thereof, the tray having slots to hold coins in a relatively fixed position. and said chain holding keys in a readily available position.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,117,516 5/1938 Skidelsky 206.82 X 2,716,483 8/1955 Naurnan 206.8l 2,892,537 6/1959 Schwartz 206-38 3,266,501 8/1966 Hankey.

MARTHA L. RICE, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. 206-82, 38

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2117516 *Sep 27, 1934May 17, 1938Changette IncReceptacle
US2716483 *Mar 22, 1952Aug 30, 1955Walter G NaumanCoin holder and key chain device
US2892537 *Apr 5, 1957Jun 30, 1959Brown & BigelowKey chain and coin holder article
US3266501 *Mar 10, 1965Aug 16, 1966Donald J HankeyCoin and key holder
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3604233 *Dec 23, 1968Sep 14, 1971Barrett Lowell WCombination key and coin holder
US3918503 *May 2, 1974Nov 11, 1975William C BundyCoin and key container
US4779568 *Dec 8, 1986Oct 25, 1988Finger Jr James SCombined personal identification, safety, and convenience device
US4832192 *May 5, 1986May 23, 1989Ponta Systems Corp.Maintenance termination unit circuit structure
US5168984 *Oct 8, 1991Dec 8, 1992Walsh Henry DOne hand multiple key container
US5279413 *Aug 26, 1992Jan 18, 1994Fischerwerke Artur Fischer Gmbh & Co. Kg.Container for flat articles, especially coins
US5388439 *Aug 26, 1992Feb 14, 1995Mocap IncorporatedMagnetic key fob
US5884513 *Oct 9, 1997Mar 23, 1999Norris; Donald E.Combination coin and key holder
US7204388Aug 14, 2002Apr 17, 2007International Molded Packaging CorporationLatchable container system
US7819279Oct 27, 2006Oct 26, 2010International Molded Packaging CorporationLatchable container system
US8408387Dec 13, 2011Apr 2, 2013Valerian F SottileHolder for removably storing circular disc-like objects
EP1559339A1 *Jan 27, 2005Aug 3, 2005Valerian F. SottileMoney holder
Classifications
U.S. Classification70/456.00R, 206/.82, 70/459, 206/38
International ClassificationA44B15/00, A45C11/32, G07D9/00, A45C11/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07D9/002, A45C11/32, A44B15/00, A44B15/005
European ClassificationA44B15/00, A44B15/00C, G07D9/00C, A45C11/32