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Publication numberUS3474810 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 28, 1969
Filing dateMay 4, 1967
Priority dateMay 4, 1967
Publication numberUS 3474810 A, US 3474810A, US-A-3474810, US3474810 A, US3474810A
InventorsWelsh Tom
Original AssigneeWelsh Tom
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Plug-in gas receptacle
US 3474810 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oa. 28, 1969 WELSH 3,474,810

PLUG-IN GAS RECEPTACLE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed lay 4, 1967 United States Patent 3,474,810 PLUG-IN GAS RECEPTACLE Tom Welsh, P.0. Box 8037, Erie, Pa. 16505 Filed May 4, 1967, Ser. No. 636,156 Int. Cl. F16k 17/40; F16] /00, 29/00 US. Cl. 137-75 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A receptacle for a gas line which can be roughed in on the wall studs in the manner of an electrical outlet box and which has a fusible thrust means between its valve and a plug which is plugged into the receptacle to connect an appliance to the gas line.

This invention is intended to provide plug-in convenience for gas appliances. In a preferred form, the incoming gas line terminates in a wall mounted receptacle containing a biased closed shut-off valve. The appliance service line, typically a flexible conduit, has a plug which is merely pushed into (or pulled out of) the receptacle to make (or break) the gas connection. The valve is automatically shut off whenever the plug is intentionally or accidentally disengaged or in case of fire.

In the drawing, FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 are elevations of receptacles mounted on interior walls, FIG. 4 is a perspective of a wall mounted receptacle for a basement wall and the like, FIG. 5 is a sectional elevation of an outside wall mounted receptacle, FIG. 6 is a section on line 66 of FIG. 1, FIG. 7 is an exploded view of the receptacle and plug used in FIG. 1, FIG. 8 is a sectional view of the FIG. 7 plug and receptacle in the engaged position, FIG. 9 is a section on line 9-9 of FIG. 3, FIG. 10 is a sectional elevation of the receptacle used in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5, FIG. 10a is an elevation of the receptacle of FIG. 10, and FIG. 11 is a section showing the receptacle flush mounted in a concrete floor box.

As shown in FIG. I, the receptacle 1 is at the center of the usual decorative surface plate 2 used to cover the conventional electric outlet box. The plate 2 is flush against the surface of wall 3. As shown in FIG. 6, the plate 2 is fastened by screws 4 to the bottom of a standard electrical outlet box 5 rigidly fixed in a suitable manner, for example by nails or by any of the other structures used for such boxes, to one of the wall studs 6. The outlet box and receptacle are fixed in place and tested prior to installing the wall 3. At this stage, the receptacle is ready for use. The decorative plate 2 is installed after finish painting and decorating. The ability to install and test the receptacle at the rough stage is an important advantage in new construction. The receptacle 1 has a shoulder 7 resting on the bottom wall 8 of the outlet box and an integral threaded projection 9 on which is screwed a clamping nut 10 for rigidly fixing the receptacle to the outlet box. A washer 11 may be arranged between the nut 10 and the bottom of the outlet box. The incoming gas line 12 is connected through an elbow 13 to the threaded extension 9. The incoming gas line is behind the surface of the wall in the same manner as electric supply lines.

In the construction of FIG. 2, there are two receptacles 14, 15 associated with a surface plate 16 secured to the electrical outlet box by a screw 17. The receptacles 14, 15 are of the same construction as the receptacle 1. FIG. 2 shows that it is possible to have two gas outlet receptacles in the same space required for two electrical outlets.

In the construction shown in FIG. 3, the receptacle 18 is installed back of a wall 19 during roughing and after finishing the wall the opening in the wall through 3,474,810 Patented Oct. 28, 1969 which the receptacle projects is covered by a circular plate 20 of the same construction as that used to cover the openings around pipes extending through a floor.

In the construction shown in FIG. 4, which is adapted to surface mounting on basement walls or studs 21 and the like, the receptacle 22 is integral with a gas tight housing 23 which as shown in FIG. 10 has generally the shape of an elbow. The housing 23 is attached to the wall 21 by screws 24. The incoming gas line 25 is screwed into a threaded opening 26 in the housing conducting gas to the interior of the housing. The receptacle 22, which extends at right angles to the incoming gas line 25, is in sealed relation to the housing 23.

The construction shown in FIG. 5 uses the same receptacle as FIG. 4 but in this installation the incoming gas supply line 27 extends through a wall 28 such as a cement block wall or the like and is screwed into the internally threaded opening 26. The receptacle 22 faces downward so as to be essentially weather-proof.

In FIG. 11 the receptacle 1a is mounted in a conventional concrete floor box 4a which is embedded in the poured concrete.

The foregoing indicates some, but not all, of the ways in which the receptacle may be used. Many modifications are possible. For example, if required, weather-proof protection could be provided for any of the receptacles. This weather-proof protection could consist of the same sort of cover used in electric wiring. In all of the constructions, gas is supplied to a plug-in receptacle which will now be described.

Referring now to FIGS. 7 and 8, which show the basic receptacle in the particular form used in FIGS. 1, 2, 6 and 11, the receptacle housing 29 has the integral shoulder 7 which seats against the bottom of a standard electrical outlet box and has the threaded extension 9 for an elbow to connect to the incoming gas line. Into the outer end of the housing is screwed a valve body 32, a gas-tight connection being eifected through a gasket or seal 33. The valve body has a tapered valve seat 34 presented toward the bottom wall 35 of the housing and a coil spring 36 arranged between the bottom wall 35 and a valve member 37 urges the valve member toward the seat 34. The valve member 37 carries a tetra seal or O-ring 38 which makes the actual sealing engagement with the seat 34. The spring 36 biases the valve member to the closed position shutting off the flow of gas.

The valve body 32 has a mouth 39 for receiving a plug 40 having a suitable connection 41 to a flexible conduit 42 for conducting gas to a gas appliance or the like. The flexible conduit 42 may, for example, be of the kind now used for making permanent connections to gas appliances. The plug 40 has a smooth, cylindrical surface, external surface 43 making sealing engagement with an O-ring 44 in an internal groove 45 in the valve body 32 and the plug 40 has a retainer groove 46 for a split metal detent ring 47 carried in a groove 47a in the valve body. The snap ring 47 releasably holds the plug in the receptacle and at the same time allows free swivelling movement of the plug in the valve body. Between the smooth cylindrical surface 43 and the groove 46 is a rib 48 having a v gradually sloped side 49 which makes contact with the snap ring 47 when the plug is inserted in the valve body and provides a gradual slope which makes the insertion of the plug in the valve body easier. On the opposite side of the rib 48 is a relatively steep slope 50 which provides a more abrupt shoulder cooperating with the snap ring 47 to prevent accidental removal of the plug. The slope 50 does not prevent intentional removal of the plug.

The bore 51 of the plug is of larger inside diameter.

than the outside diameter of hollow cylindrical projection 52 on the valve member 37. A plurality of ports 53 are arranged in the projection 52. The projection 52 has an external groove 54 receiving a split ring 55 of fusible material such as solder which projects radially outside the groove. The outside diameter of the solder ring 55 is greater than the inside diameter of the bore 51 of the plug. The solder ring 55 forms the thrust transmitting connection between the plug 40 and the valve member 37. If the solder ring 55 were not present, insertion of the plug in the valve body 32 would not open the valve 37. The bore 51 of the plug would merely telescope over the cylindrical projection 52 on the valve member and the valve would remain closed under the influence of the coil spring 36. This means that When the solder ring 55 melts due to fire, the thrust transmitting connection is no longer present and the valve 37 is immediately closed under the influence of the spring 36, shutting oflf the flow of gas.

During the initial insertion of the plug, the O-ring 44 initially makes sealing engagement with the cylindrical surface 43 as indicated at 56 in FIG. 7. At this stage, the solder ring 55 occupies the position relative to the plug 40 indicated by the numeral 57 so that the valve 37 is shut. As entry of the plug into the valve body continues, the chamfered end 58 of the plug engages the solder ring 55 and pushes the valve 37 away from its seat 34 so that gas can flow through the ports 53 into the interior of the plug 40. The flow of gas to the line 42 is accordingly established after the seal is made between the O-ring 44 and the plug. In order to have the plug remain permanently in the receptacle, it is necessary that it be pushed into the valve body 32 far enough to bring the detent ring 47 into the groove 46. This provides a swivel detent holding the plug within the receptacle against accidental displacement.

In the construction of FIGS. 3, 4, 5, 9 and 10, the housing 23 which corresponds functionally to the housing 29 is made in the form of an elbow and in such a manner that it does not require an electric outlet box or equivalent for installation. Making the housing in the form of an elbow simplifies and reduces the cost of installation. Further reduction in cost and in labor is effected by elimination of the electric outlet box. The housing has an internally threaded mouth 60 into which the valve body 32 is screwed and has a Washer 61 providing a seat for the coil spring 36. In other respects, the construction is identical with that shown in FIGS. 7 and 8. For mounting on a basement wall, the housing has external grooves 62 for receiving the mounting screws 24 as shown in FIG. 4. Two sets of grooves 62 are shown. The housing has flat surfaces 62a, 6212 which may be fixed to the supporting structure during the rough construction. For mounting on an interior wall such as that shown in FIG. 9 having a stud 63 and the plaster surface 19, a bracket 65 is used and is connected to the housing by screws 66 fitting in the grooves 62. The bracket is then attached to the stud by nails or screws 67 which may be positioned so as to accommodate the thickness of the wall surface 19. Instead of the bracket, any other structure used for electrical outlet boxes may be used to support the housing. After the rough installation, the conventional cover plate 20 may he slipped over the projecting end of the valve body 32.

When the receptacles are empty, the valve member 37 is accessible and may be intentionally pushed inward or open with a screw driver or the like. However, stops (such as solder ring 55 and shoulder 68) are provided which prevent movement of the projection 52 outside the valve body so that upon release of the opening force, the valve member snaps back to the closed position.

What is claimed as new is:

' 1. A gas receptacle comprising a gas tight housing having an inlet connection to a gas line, a valve body fixed to the housing having a bore with a mouth, means for mounting the housing on a wall or the like with the mouth outwardly presented, a tubular plug having one end adapted to be fixed to a flexible line leading to a gas appliance and the other end telescoped into said bore,

said plug having an external groove between its ends and said body having detent meansyieldably biased into said groove, the detent means cooperating with the groove to releasably hold the plug in the valve body and to allow free swivelling movement of the plug in the valve body, the detent means and plug having interengaging cam surfaces camming the detent means radially outward of the groove upon axial thrust exerted on the plug in the direction to insert the plug into the body and also upon axial thrust exerted on the plug in the direction to remove the plug from the body whereby the plug may be merely pushed into or pulled out of the body, a valve member in said hosing biased to closed position and having a cylindrical wall telescoped into the plug, a thrust transmitting connection between the plug and valve member engaged as the plug is inserted for opening the valve, said connection limiting the telescoping of the cylindrical wall relative to the plug and being releasable upon overheating to permit further telescoping of the cylindrical wall relative to the plug to a closed position of the valve member, sealing means between the plug and the bore engaged prior to opening of the valve.

2. The receptacle of claim 1 in which the housing is in the form of an elbow with the inlet connection at an angle to the valve body, said housing having one or more flat surfaces for fixation to a wall supporting structure whereby the housing may be installed and tested during roughing and prior to installing a wall on said structure.

3. The receptacle of claim 2 in which the housing has grooves for fastening means to secure the housing to a wall stud.

4. The receptacle of claim 2 in which a wall supporting structure has a bracket with a projecting section to which one of the flat surfaces of the housing is fixed.

5. A gas receptacle comprising a gas tight housing having an inlet connection, a tubular plug having one end adapted to be connected to a flexible line leading to a gas appliance, a valve member in said housing biased to closed position and having a cylindrical wall in telescoping relation to the plug, a thrust transmitting connection between the plug and valve member engaged as the plug is inserted for opening the valve, said connection limiting the telescoping of the cylindrical wall relative to the plug and being releasable upon overheating to permit further telescoping of the cylindrical wall relative to the plug to a closed position of the valve member, sealing means between the plug and the bore engaged prior to opening of the valve, the thrust transmitting connection comprising a fusible element on the cylindrical wall projecting radially therefrom in position to be engaged by the plug as it is pushed into the bore of the valve body.

6. A gas receptacle comprising a gas tight housing having an inlet connection to a gas line, a valve body fixed to the housing having a bore with a mouth, means for mounting the housing on a wall or the like with the mouth outwardly presented, a tubular plug having one end adapted to be fixed to a flexible line leading to a gas appliance and the other end telescoped into said bore, said body having detent means for holding the plug in said bore, a valve member slidably mounted in the body, said body having a seat against which the valve member closes, means for biasing said valve member toward said mouth and against said seat, said plug and said valve member being telescoping members, a thrust transmitting connection between said telescoping members engaged as the plug is inserted for opening the valve, said thrust transmitting connection limiting the telescoping of said telescoping members and being releasable upon overheating to permit further telescoping of said telescoping members to a closed position of the valve, stop means including said connection for holding the valve member in assembled relation to said body while permitting the relative movement of the valve member relative to said body for opening and closing the valve independently of Said plug.

7. The receptacle of claim 6 in which the thrust transmitting connection comprises a fusible element on one of the telescoping members projecting radially therefrom in position to engage the other telescoping member as the plug is pushed into the bore of the valve body.

8. The receptacle of claim 6 in which said plug has an external groove between its ends and said body has detent means yieldably biased into said groove, the detent means cooperating with the groove to releasably hold the plug in the valve body and to allow free swivelling movement of the plug in the valve body, the detent means and plug having interengaging cam surfaces camming the detent means radially outward of the groove upon axial thrust exerted on the plug in the direction to insert the plug into the body and also upon axial thrust exerted on the plug in the direction to remove the plug from the body whereby the plug may be merely pushed into or pulled out of the body.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,181,758 11/1939 Goon 61131 251-149.6 2,412,685 12/1946 Hoffman et a1. 251 149.6 5 2,617,442 11/1952 Bohren 137-360 2,908,511 11/1959 Rogers 137 359 XR 3,177,018 4/1965 Goodwin 251149.6 XR 3,245,423 4/1966 Hansen et a1. 137-75 XR U.S. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2181758 *Oct 1, 1937Nov 28, 1939Goon Earl BValved fluid outlet
US2412685 *Apr 22, 1944Dec 17, 1946Linde Air Prod CoConduit coupling
US2617442 *Apr 4, 1949Nov 11, 1952Bohren Arthur HRotary plug wall valve
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3741521 *Jun 3, 1971Jun 26, 1973Tatsuno HPipe coupling with safety valve
US4290440 *Sep 11, 1980Sep 22, 1981M. B. Sturgis, Inc.Quick disconnect coupling with a heat-sensitive cutoff feature
US4338688 *Aug 5, 1980Jul 13, 1982Elbert L. PettyEnclosure for tub drains
US4974623 *Feb 14, 1990Dec 4, 1990Sturgis Malcolm BHeat-sensitive cut-off for gas conduits and the like, and method of manufacture
US5020563 *Jun 22, 1990Jun 4, 1991Gas Research InstituteConnector set
US5029607 *Dec 15, 1989Jul 9, 1991Gas Research InstituteTamper-resistant fluid connector
US5039136 *Jan 30, 1990Aug 13, 1991Snow Joseph EStabilizing fitting for gases and fluids
US5577706 *Oct 25, 1995Nov 26, 1996King; Robert J.Water faucet with automatic shut-off mechanism for water conservation
US6454311 *Sep 28, 2000Sep 24, 2002Lincoln Brass Works, Inc.Gas line mounting assembly
US6695001Jul 30, 2001Feb 24, 2004Nicola A. DicosolaGas connection housing and a method of constructing a gas connection housing
US7681927 *Oct 13, 2004Mar 23, 2010Eaton CorporationLow pressure fitting
US9249974 *Mar 14, 2011Feb 2, 2016Marshall Excelsior CompanyGas convenience outlet
US20050046185 *Oct 13, 2004Mar 3, 2005Olson Darwin C.Low pressure fitting
US20110308633 *Mar 14, 2011Dec 22, 2011Marshall Excelsior CompanyGas convenience outlet
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/75, 251/149.7, 137/360, 137/362, 137/361, 285/321, 285/64
International ClassificationF16L37/088, F16L37/28, F16L37/42, F16L37/00
Cooperative ClassificationF16L37/088, F16L37/42
European ClassificationF16L37/42, F16L37/088