Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3478482 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 18, 1969
Filing dateOct 24, 1967
Priority dateOct 24, 1967
Publication numberUS 3478482 A, US 3478482A, US-A-3478482, US3478482 A, US3478482A
InventorsWeir Richard L
Original AssigneeWeir Richard L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Building block construction
US 3478482 A
Abstract  available in
Images(10)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Filed oct. 24. 1987 10 Sheets-Sheet 1 IIVEIT R.

7 FIG. 11|:

FIGJII Nov. 18, 1969 R. L. wElR BUILDING BLOCK CONSTRUCTION 10 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed 001;. 24. 1967 OPEN AR EA wnuu OPEN AREA Nov. 18, 1969 mam:

Nov. 18, 1969 R. L. wr-:lR

BUILDING' BLOCK CONSTRUCTION Filed oot. 24, 1987 10 Sheets-Sheet FIGYIII FIG. III

FIG. II

HG. Ha 4 INVEN OR.

Nov; 18, 1969 R. wElR 3,478482 BUILDING BLOCK CONSTRUCTION Filed oct. 24. 1987 10 shee'zs-sheet s Nov. 18, 1969 R. L. wElR BUILDING BLOCK CONSTRUCTION 10 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed 0015. 24. 1967 'FIGIII OPEN REA OPEN ARE A FIG. XIId nc; mf'

VE OR.

Nov. 18, 1969 R. L. wElR BUILDING BLOCK CONSTRUCTION 10 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed Oct. 24. 1967 EUR Nov. 18, 1969 R. L. wElR BUILDING BLOCK CONSTRUCTION 10 Sheets-Sheet 8 Filed Oct. 24. 1967 EH a:

uHH .0:

Nov. 18, 1969 R. L. WEIR BUILDING BLoCK coNs'rRUc'rIoN 10 Sheets-Sheet 9 Filed Oct. 24. 1967 Nov. 18, 1969 R. WEIR 3,478,482

BUILDING BLOCK CONSTRUCTION Filed OC'. 24. 1967 10 SheetS-Sheet 10 N CD NV TOR.

United States Patent O 'U.s. 52-594 j s ciaims ABSTRACT OF- TI-IE DISCLOSURE This application discloses `a vsystem of building block construction which uses as a main component ay standard rectangular modular block made of one or two basically cubular Sections which are modular in all three dimensions .,.EaCh Section has a tapered 'hollow truncated pyramid shaped holeof square transversecross section. Each cubical section has a lower,`, square tapered protruding hole extension that has a smooth unchanging continuation of'vsaid first named hole and has a square outer frustopyrar'nidal surface' that fits tightly both horizontally and vert'ically into the top vof the hole of a similar lowerand adjacent cubical section. The blocks 'of this invention can be assembled to form walls, partitions, floors and/ or roofs of bnildings. Such blocks may surround windows and/ or doors and may be` pre-str'essed and pulled together by tension members. The blocks may also have fiexible' removable bands or seals to permit walls, etc., to be assembled without mortar. Such walls may also be disassembled and reassembled, if desired.

,tion of wall or building construction to provide an easy method of fabricating walls or building that will have the characteristics of pre-stressed building elements and yet be capable of assembly and disassembly without mortar or other adhesive compounds. The system consists of a'standard rectangular modular block which is -made up of two basically cubular sections. Extending vertically through each section is a tapered hollow hole inthe form ofV an inverted truncatedlp'yramid. This basic block. and the half block, which make up the basic system together with locking plates and cables to create a pre-stressed'effect in the laid-upwalls' or roof, comprise themajor construction 'elements of the system. 'It is to be noted'that a specific advantage of myv system of construction involves the use of a post stressing system that can be installed after the walls have been laid up.v As described in 'detail later herein, the lock plates of the dropv through cable and plate assemblies automatically align in the hole of the bottom most block through which they are dropped and when the cable is' pulled tight, provide a firm uniform base for providing even tension in the blocks which are locked between the top and lower plates. Included with the blocks in the system are modular pre-formed window and door surrounds which drop into openings left in the wall erection as the walls vare laid up 'to provide the conventional window and door openings required in present day housing configurations. Because of the modular construction of the blocks, which are modular in all three directions when assembled, beams may be provided that will fit into the general construction and provide a continuous flat exterior surface, by setting the rectangular blocks on end and installing stress-providing elements as 'in standard wall construction.

3,4;78,48Z Patented Nov. 18, 1969 ICC Sealing is provided by a simple snap-in continuous band similar to a rubber band. The bands snap into shallow grooves provided nearthe outer face of the individual blocks. The use of flexible, removable bands as sealing elements provides for a completely demountable and reusable structure. The blocks are not defaced with motor or other masticthat must be removed prior to re-use. Two short tapered hollow truncated pyramidal sections extending from the lower face of the block fit snugly in the hollow truncated pyramidal Sections in the top faces' of adjoining lower blocks to lock the wall together as the blocks are laid up. As the blocks are formed with sides of the pyramid sections parallel to the oorresponding faces of` the block, the blocks are self-aligning and automatically form a straight true wall as laid up.

' It is to be noted that all blocks are exact multiples of squares and that an exact right angle is formed when wall corners are laid up. This is particularly important in that it provides a completed structure with square, true and perpendicualr wall sections and matching interlocking and partition walls. It is also to be noted that by having square tapered protruding sections on the lower face of the blocks and square tapered receiving Sections on the upper face of the blocks the Stress producing elements described later herein force the blocks into close adjustment in both horizontal and Vertical directions through the slope of the interlocking surfaces and exert pressure to provide a positive seal through compression of the flexible snap-in seal that fits in the groove towards the outer face of each individual block. The window and door Sections, described later herein, are modular increments of the blocks and thus fit exactly into openings provided by omitting blocks' from the walls as the walls are laid up land will also be sealed into the wall by the flexible bands which surround each block. In view of the fact that wall and roof elements can be fabricated from the same blocks in the same general manner, it is easily seen that all sections could be laid up vertically and lifted, through a simple jacking mechanism or by hand, to lay on the tops of walls erected by the method described later herein. A special roof connecting section block, described later herein, may be used to connect sections to provide a larger roof area. Roof beam Sections described within this specification provide means for extending the roof span over broader areas. Alternate roof section blocks with additional inner elements for providing methods of installing additional cables for further stressing of the roof blocks are also described later herein.

A method is provided for attaching the roof to the wall Sections by the use of hollow internal threaded tiedown bolts which eXtend through holes made in the roof blocks directly over the upper endsof the prestressing elements and the Vertical walls. i

Alternate means are provided for attachment of the lower section of the wall, which retains the lower element of the stressing assembly to the foundation for the building or wall. A preferred method is by the use ,of a formed or extruded footer described later herein which can be cast into the concrete foundation or staked into the ground. These footer sections when screwed or bolted together can provide the base for the building or wall and if bolted down rather than actually cast into the concrete, can make possible a construction of a completely portable building that can be mounted or dismounted in a very. short period of time by the engagement of bolts and nuts or other stress producing elements.

To summarize, some of the objects of this invention are to provide an easy erectable and dismountable wall or building that will contain the elements of prestressed panels or beams, a wall or building that is weather proof without use of mortar or other adhesive means, and may thus be taken apart and re-erected without removal of mortar or other sealer from individual blocks, a wall or building that is self-aligning and modular in all three directions, a wall or building that has excellent qualities for insulation due to the sealed hollow air-enclosed sections in the walls, a wall or building that has vertical openings from top to bottom of the walls and horizontally across the floor or roof Sections for use in ducting electrical Wire, plumbing, heating, air conditioning, etc.

By the use of various color decorative blocks, artistic effects can be easily created or changed by planning arrangement as the blocks are laid up. The walls can be taken down and blocks rearranged for different designs if this is desirable. Walls can be laid up (stacked) in compact areas with no-waste space for easily transportability if required to fit in a truck, aircraft, boxcar or other transportation vehicle.

Another object of the nvention as described later herein is to provide a simple method or methods of block fabrication which reduce weight and cost over other methods of construction. A further object of the nvention is to provide simple window and door surrounds which will be artistic in nature and fit within the modular openings provided within wall construction and are sealed therein by the seal Sections surrounding adjacent blocks.

These and other objects of the system will become apparent as the description proceeds with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE I is a perspective view of a standard block according to this nvention.

FIGURE Ia is a perspective view of an alternate standard block which has an interior ribbed section in the outer wall Sections of the block.

FIGURE II is a Vertical view half in cross Section and half in elevation of a standard block of FIGURE I according to this nvention.

FIGURE IIa is a horizontal cross section of FIG- URE Ia along plane A--A, and showing the internal ribs in the outer Wall sections.

FIGURE IIb is an enlarged view of a portion of FIG- URE II.

FIGURE III is a perspective view of a half block.

FIGURE IV is a perspective view of a typical laidup wall section including stress elements.

FIGURE V is an exploded perspective view showing a section of wall and roof.

FIGURE VI is a perspective view of standard block showing the Seal groove.

FIGURE VIa is a cross section view of part of FIG- URE VI showing the Seal in the groove.

FIGURE VII is a half section, half elevation view of a laid-up Wall showing the anchor plate and footer section.

FIGURE VIII is an end view of a block supported on an anchor plate and footer.

FIGURE IX is an alternate type of footer construction using a poured concrete footer.

FIGURE IXa is an end view of a portion of FIGURE IX.

FIGURE X is a cross section view of another alternate footer section using special footer blocks.

FIGURE XI is a side view of a roof erectng jack and roof installation details.

FIGURES XII, XIIa, XIIb, XIIc, XIId, XIIe, and XII, are a group of details showing alternate roof con- Struction means.

FIGURES XHg and XIIh are perspective exploded view drawings showing details of the roof connector block with adjoining roof blocks and roof connector, which is shown in more detail in perspective cut-away drawing, FIGURE XIIh.

FIGURES XIII and XIIIa are perspective drawings showing roof beam construction details.

FIGURE XIV is a group of drawings showing extruded window and door surround details.

FIGURE XV shows a plan and end view of a typical window sash.

FIGURE XVI shows details of the door surrounds.

FIGURES XVII and XVIIa show bottom and end views of the footer.

FIGURE XVIII shows a typical completed structure.

The standard blocks of this nvention required for the construction system are depicted in FIGURES I, II and III. FIGURE I shows the basic standard block A which is rectangular in Shape and modular in form in that it consists basically of two united cubular half blocks B as shown in FIGURE III.

As the basic elements that make up the system, when the walls are laid up, are cubes or multiples of cubes, the completed structure will be modular in all three directions. Hollow truncated pyramid or frusto-pyramidal Sections or openings 1 extend vertically through the blocks A and B from the upper face through the lower square protruding section or extension 2. The outside of the lower square tapered protruding extensions 2 are of Such a Size that they will fit within the hollow openings 1 of standard block A FIGURE I or half block B of'FIGURE III and form a tight fit both horizontally and vertically, when forced down by the stressing elements described later herein.

Groove 3 extends completely around the outer face of blocks A and B of FIGURES I, Ia and III and receives and retains a flexible seal shown in more detail in FIGURE VIa. As the openings land extensions 2 are tapered with square transverse cross Sections, it will be seen that the blocks may be placed in such a manner as totbe either parallel to or at right angles to other blocks in the system.

The preferred construction details of a typical block are depicted in FIGURE II. Hollow Shell 4 extends completelyv around the outside of the block and also forms the inside. portion 4' of the hollow truncated pyramid opening 1. The blocks may be formed upside down with respect to the position shown in FIGURE II. Cap 5 may be a cap Shell placed on the top of the Shell 4 and sealed in place after foaming cement or foaming plastic 6 is poured or injected into the space provided within the inverted shell 4. Vent holes 7 are provided to let the volatile elements of foaming action escape.

As an alternate method of construction a series of vertical ribs FIGURE Ia may be provided, in lieu of foaming plastic, in the outer wall Sections to provide structural integrity to the blocks. Injection molding or other means may be used to provide blocks to this configuration. As another alternate mehod of constructiton, foaming elements may be injected through vent holes 7, after cap 5 is sealed to Shell 4, 4'. As a further alternate method of fabrication, a solid lightweight plastic or foam block might be fabricated without the use of the shell construction.

The general construction system is depicted in perspective views, FIGURES IV and V which show parts of the laid-up wall and roof including a pre-cast window surround 9 in place. The corner views C and D of the walls show the arrangement of the blocks for corner construction. As can be Seen from FIGURES IV and V, the standard blocks are laid up in alternate courses so that, for example, the block A on top of the next lower row will lock the two lower blocks A' and A' together as the tapered extensions 2 of block A, as shown in FIGURE I, fit snugly within the top openings 1 of the lower blocks A' and A'.

The tapered Sections when forced together by pressure w when the cable and plate assemblies described later herein are tightened will exert pressure in both Vertical and horizontal directions and through the use of the compressive seals around each block, Seal the entire wall including the window and door surrounds. A half block 8 is used where required to provide a Straight Vertical portion for insetion of pre-cast window or door surrounds 9 which are described later herein. The stressing elements of the construction system consist of an anchor plate 10 which is attached by cable 11 through cable clamp 12 to upper cable clamps 13 which attaches upper attaching bolt 14 which extends through hole 15' in tapered upper lock plate 15. Lock plate nut 16 may be screwed onto attaching bolt 14 and pulls anchor plate into tight contact with the bottom of the wall or wall footer described later herein and also forces tapered upper lock plate downward into tapered opening 1. As many of these anchoring ,devices as required may be used to tie the wall together to give the desired structural integrity of the finshed wall section. The roof section 17, FIGURE V, may be constructed substantially in the same manner as the side walls E and F for limited span Operations and may be bolted to the side walls E and F with several internal threaded tie-down bolts 18 which screw over upper attaching bolts 14 and hold roof section 17 firmly `on the side walls E and F. It will thus be seen that a short span roofed building can be constructed using only the Stress producing assembly 10-16, the standard block A described in connection with FIGURE I, and 'the half block B depicted in FIGURE III. Window and door surrounds described later herein would normally be included in the construction of a simple structure.

FIGURE VI is a perspective view of a standard block A to show the detailed construction of the sealing elements of the block. Groove 19 which may be the same as groove 3 of FIGURE I extends completely around the block in a plane-parallel to the outer face 20 and in close proximity to such outer face. Inserted in groove 19 as depicted in FIGURE VIa is flexible seal 21 which normally extends a short distance above the top of the .groove 19 and is compressed into the groove 19 when the blocks are forced together in both directions through -the Stress producing action of the wall locking system, 'as previously described herein.

A preferred and optional system of typical footer installations is shown in FIGURES VII, VIII, IX, IXa, X, XVII and XVIIa. FIGURE VII shows a side view and ;partial cross section' view of -a footer section" 22 with anchor plate 10 and'cable 11 and a row of blocks A installed. An end view of the footer section and the remainder of lFIGURE VII is shown in .FIGURE VHI.

VThe form footer section 22 may be fabricated of extruded valuminum, extruded plastic or other suitable material. It .is shaped in such a manner that the protruding sections 2 of the bottom extension 2 of the blocks A (or B) fit within recessed part 23, FIGURES XVII and XVIIa,

vwhile the bottom edges 24a of the blocks A (or B) rest on the upper faces 24 of footer section 22. The bottom edges'or extensions 25 of footer section 22 are Vformed vat right angles to the vertical walls 22A of the footer .22. Holes 63, FIGURE XVII are provided in the right -angle vsections 25 through which pins or stakes 25A may be driven to anchor the footer to the ground or foundawill thus be seen that the anchor plate 10 of the standard -anchor plate assembly may be dropped down through the holes 1 in the blocks A or B from above after the walls are 'laid up, and on down'through the footer 22 and then 'pulled' up and-locked through the upper lock plate 15 to tie the footer and the wall section together and provide a structure with the characteristics of a composite prestressed unit. Another method of footer'installation is depicted in FIGURES IX and IXa in which bolts 64`are precast in -the concrete footer H which has a grooved portion J to accommodate the lower square protruding extensions 2 of the blocks A or B. In this method, a first or second row .of individual blocks A or B as required, are bolted down to' the footer H through the use of tapered upper lock `plates 15 which are pulled down by nuts 15a in holes 1 of blocks A or B. The block and anchor plate 10, cable 11, and locking plate 15 arrangement, as previously'described herein in connection with FIGURE lX may then be inserted through the aligned hole 1' in the upper joined block 65 to provide a positive tie between the footer H and the rest of the structure.

A third method is shown in FIGURE X in which special footer blocks A" are provided with a square hollow section 27 within which the anchor plates 10 may be lowered by cables 11 and pulled up to lock upper rows of blocks A or B. These footer blocks A" may then be cast directly in the concrete footer 28 and will provide a positive lock between the footer 28 and any upper part of the wall and roof Sections.

A simple method of erecting the roof and placing it on top of the wall Sections is depicted in FIGURE XI. Wall section 29, Wall corner 30, and wall face 31 are shown laid up. It is assumed in this instance, that the other wall sections for a rectangular structure are already in place. Adjustable rack 32 may be made up from standard structural angles in a generally rectangular shape to carry a wall or roof section 33 which is laid up as a wall section within the framework of the angles. A bracing angular framework 34 is laid up against the face 31 of the laid-up wall. The upper ends of the adjustable frameworks 34 are attached by pivots 35 at either end of the laid-up wall to adjustable rack 32. Rollers 36 are provided in rack 32 to make rolling of the roof section easy after it is forced up into horizontal position by ratchet and rack, pipe jack 37. Cable 38 is attached from the upper end of framework 34 to the opposite side of the building or completely around the building to the opposite side of the building or completely around the building to the opposite end of framework 34 to hold framework 34 tightly against the wall. It will thus be seen that by operating crank 39 which actuates ratchet and rack, pipe jack 37, it is possible to position the pre-stressed roof section 33 up to a horizontal position at the level of the top of the wall in order that it may be easily pushed onto the top of the wall and in place to provide the necessary roof section. Rollers 40 are provided as required to -make rolling the roof along the wall to the desired position an easy matter. Internal threaded tie-down bolt 18 also shown in FIGURE V is then inserted through the hole 18A, FIGURE V, drilled or formed in a roof block and attached to anchoring bolt 14 to fix roof permanently in place.

Alternate types o-f roof construction blocks and roof attaching blocks 69 are shown in FIGURES XII, XIIa, b, c, d, g and h. The cross section lines of FIGURES XII, XIIa, XIIc and XIId are shown on FIGUREtXIIg. In other words, FIGURE XII, which is a side view of one alternate roof block, and FIGURE XIIa which is a plan view half horizontal cross section of the same roof block depict a modified standard block with eight in- Vcluded corner inserts 41 cast in place within the hollow openings 1 of the block. Holes 42 are provided within these corner inserts 41 through which-cable and threaded bolts 43 may be inserted as the blocks. are laid together in roof sections. Threaded ends 43 may be swagedto the cable 43' in such a manner that the swaged portions Will fit through the holes 42 in the block. Pressure may then be exerted by nuts 70 on the threaded swaged ends 43 in such a manner that the effects of pre-stressed construction will be produced. By using multiple cables (7 to` 8-if lrefquired) through each block, additional stressing and support may be provided to extendthe span of theroof section to cover all reasonable requirements for normal housing fabrication. i

Open area roof section connector blocks 71a2re depicted `in FIGURES X110, d and g, as the blocks 69 -and71 are .laid up when tying the roof sections together. It is seen -connector 72 may consist of a cable 45 and 'plate end fittings 46 that will fit over the roof stressing cable ends 43 within the connector blocks 71 shown in FIGURES XlIc, XXId and h, and provide a method of locking roof Sections together in a simple manner. A U shaped metal strap 73, FIGURE XII with holes 74 in the ends 75 may be used in lieu of the cable and plate attachment depicted in FIGURE XIIe.

FIGURE XIII depicts a beam construction block in place in a wall section 47 and roof section 48. Exploded view FIGURE XIIIa shows the beam and roof blocks as they would lay up in construction system. Cable locking assemblies 49 extend through the blocks as in previously described conditions. The upper locking plate 15 in this instance has four holes in lieu of the one in the wall locking block. Angle brackets 50 are mounted to the sides of the beam blocks with bolts that extend through the block to attach plates on either or both sides. The standard roof blocks then lay on these angle carriers and are attached thereto by bolts or screws. When beam sections are used in exterior construction, a fiexible sealing element 51 will be required between the beam and the standard roof blocks.

Window and door surrounds are depcted in FIGURE XIV. Sill 52 is shown in cross section and has a standard window sill configuration on the top face. The bottom section is grooved at 53 to allow entrance of standard wall blocks A of FIGURE I. In this manner, the sill section will fit down over the standard wall block, and outer face, 54 and inner face 55 will provide coverage for the joint. Header and side window sections 56 have the same cross sectional configuration and provide a grooved area for the entrance of either the bottom extruded portion 2 of the block A above the header, or the flat surfaces 57 of the standard wall blocks adjacent to the sides of the window. Grooves 58 are provided in both the header and side window Sections 56 for the entrance of sashes 59, FIGURE XV, which are centered by means of flat springs 60 attached to either side of the window sash. Weather stripping 61 is also provided for the sections that ride in the grooves.

Door surrounds as shown in FIGURE XVI follow essentially the same exterior configurations as the window surrounds. The interior portion of the side and header surrounds 64 are formed for standard inner and outer door installation. Section 66 is a cross section of the door footer. It is contemplated that the surrounds of both doors and windows, would be either formed in one section or cemented and sealed together at the corners. The units could be inserted at this point or built in as the wall blocks are laid up, and a finished structure results. A typical completed structure is shown in FIGURE XVIII. It is to be noted that various shapes could be provided in the roof structure by the addition of more blocks 62 as shown over the front door in the completed building.

A modular, cube shaped, basic building block B, FIG- URE III, is thus provided. It has six equal square boundary means or outer main walls 80-85, inclusive, at right angles to each other. The block B has a square cross sectioned, truncated, frusto-pyramidal passageway means 86 extending from, and having a larger opening means 87, at boundary means 81 of said square passageway means. Such passageway means 86 extends to and has a smaller opening means 88, similar to opening means 88A, FIG- URE II, at the opposite boundary means 84. Such passageway means 86 has a central axis 89 perpendicular to and passing through the centers of said boundary means 81 and 84.

Said block B, FIGURE III has a square, tapered protruding extension means 90 on said boundary means 84 with a square cross sectioned, truncated, frustopyramidal passageway means, similar to passageway 91A of FIG- URE II which is a continuation of and aligned with the passageway means 86, similar to passageway means 86A and 91A of FIGURE II, at the smaller opening means corresponding to smaller opening means 88A. Said pro- 8 truding extension means has outer walls 5', similar to walls 5 of FIGURE II, which form a square, truncated, frusto-pyramidal construction which fits snugly and tightly in the larger opening means 87 of the boundary means 81 of an aligned similar block, similar to block B, FIGURE HI.

Such block B, FIGURE III is modular in all three dimensions.

The rectangular, modular basic building 'blocks A of FIGURES I, II and/or Ia, IIa are each made substantially to correspond to two modular basic building blocks B of FIGURE III which two blocks B are ntegrally and equally joined together at one each of their square boundary means -85, in the manner shown and previously described in connection with such FIGURES I, II, Ia and IIa.

Such basic blocks B may be considered as joined along the junction lines 92 of such FIGURES I and II and junction lines 93 of FIGURES Ia and IIa to form the basic 'building blocks A of such FIGURES I, II, I and Ila.

Such basic blocks A are modular in all three dimensions.

Because the blocks A and B of FIGURES I, II, Ia, IIa and III are modular in all three dimensions, it is possible to build Vertical and horizontal walls, floors, partitions, roofs, etc. with right angle interlocking relationship, as has been herein disclosed.

Each of said basic blocks A has two of said frustopyramidal passageway means 1, and two extension means 5.

It is obvious from the foregoing description that a structure comprised of the simple units and blocks shown and described herein would be easily erected or dsassembled to provide the special mobility required for present day needs. It is also obvious that this type of construction could be used for retaining walls, small portable dog houses that could be used inside or out, small recreation units, full size cabanas, etc.

What is claimed is:

1. A modular, cube shaped, basic building block having six equal square boundary means at right angles to each other with a square cross sectioned, truncated, frustopyramidal passageway means extending from and having a larger opening means at a first one of said square boundary means, said passageway means extending to and having a smller opening means at an opposite and second boundary means and with the central axis of said passageway means being perpendicular to and passing through the centers of said first and second boundary means, said block having a square, tapered protruding extension means on said second boundary means with a square cross sectioned, truncated, frusto-pyramidal passageway means which is a continuation of and aligned with said first named truncated passageway means at said smaller opening, said protruding extension means having outer walls which form a square, truncated, frusto-pyramidal construction which fits snugly and tightly in the frusto-pyramidal larger opening means of the first boundary means of an aligned similar block, and in which five of said boundary means are formed by a main hollow shell construction which also forms said frusto-pyramidal passageway means, said shell construction containing reinforcing material and the second boundary means is formed by a cap shell with said cap shell also forming said protruding extension means, said cap shell being secured to the edges of said boundary means and said frusto-pyramidal passageway means.

2. A'block according to claim 1 in which said rein-` forcing material is foamed material.

3. A block according to claim 1 in which said reinforcing material includes reinforcing ribs.

4. A rectangular modular basic building block having six rectangular boundary means and made of two modular, cube shaped, basic building blocks which are ntegrally and equally joined together at one each of their square boundary means, each of said cube shaped basic building blocks having six equal square boundary means at right angles to each other with a square, cross sectioned, truncated, frusto-pyramidalpassageway means extending from and having a larger opening means at a first ione of said square boundary means, said passageway means extending to and having a smaller opening means at an opposite and second boundary means and with the central axis of said passageway means being perpendicular to and passing through the centers of said first and second 'boundary means, said block having a square, tapered protruding extension means on said second boundary means with a square cross sectioned, truncated frusto-pyramidal passageway means which is a continuation of and aligned with said first named truncated passageway means at said smaller opening, said 'protruding extension means having outer walls which form a square, truncated, frustopyramidal construction which fits snugly and tightly in the frusto-pyramidal `larger opening means of the first boundary means of an aligned similar block, and in which each of said two cube shaped basic building blocks are integrally and equallyjoined together at one each of their Square boundary means, said rectangular block having two of said frusto-pyramidal passageway means and two extension -means and in which five of its rectangular boundary means are forrned by a main hollow shell construction which also forms said two frusto-pyramidal passageway means, and' said second `boundary means is formed by a cap shell which also forms two extension 10 means, said cap shell being secured to the edges of said boundary rectangular means and said two frusto-pyramidal passageway means, and said main shell construction contains reinforcing material.

5. A block construction according to claim 4 in which said reinforcing material is foamed material.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1 ,416,709 5/1922 Hahn 52-584 X 2,684,589 7/1954 Perreton 52-439 X 2',696,102 12/1954 Zagray 52-503 X 3,239,982 3/1966 Nicosia 52-503 X -3,256,657 -6/1966 Phipps 52-227 FOREIGN PATENTS 150,186 2/1953 Australia.

477,777 10/1951 Canada.

161,790 4/ 1921 Great Britain.

706,227 3/ 1954 Great Britain.

FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner PRICE C. FAW, JR., Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1416709 *Feb 7, 1919May 23, 1922Clark AgBuilding construction
US2684589 *Feb 7, 1948Jul 27, 1954Formbloc IncInterlocking hollow building block
US2696102 *Dec 31, 1948Dec 7, 1954Preeision Building System IncBeam of reinforced building blocks
US3239982 *Apr 12, 1962Mar 15, 1966Joseph A NicosiaReinforced synthetic resin structural panel
US3256657 *Jan 30, 1963Jun 21, 1966Idaho Invest CorpWall of interlocked, adhesively secured building blocks and sealing means therebetween
AU150186B * Title not available
CA477777A *Oct 16, 1951Josef Oldrich SchullerFormblocks
GB161790A * Title not available
GB706227A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3581454 *Mar 12, 1969Jun 1, 1971Fitzek HerbertFormwork element
US3710534 *Mar 16, 1970Jan 16, 1973Mc Namara JMethod of forming building units and assembling same with lateral displacement
US3782049 *May 19, 1972Jan 1, 1974Sachs MWall forming blocks
US3890751 *Mar 11, 1974Jun 24, 1975Plasticrete CorpPost hole block
US4001988 *Jan 9, 1975Jan 11, 1977Monte RieflerConcrete block panel
US4055928 *Apr 14, 1976Nov 1, 1977Otto MagerleCasing brick, and a method and apparatus for making the same
US4137684 *Feb 4, 1977Feb 6, 1979Selleck Nicholls Williams (E.C.C.) LimitedBuilding panel
US4226061 *Jun 16, 1978Oct 7, 1980Day Jr Paul TReinforced masonry construction
US4252767 *Jun 17, 1975Feb 24, 1981Daniel ZimmerComposite building module
US4297816 *Jul 12, 1979Nov 3, 1981George KellaInterlocking construction block
US4337605 *Jul 18, 1980Jul 6, 1982Tudek Arthur LConcrete building blocks with looped securing rods for mortarless wall construction
US4372091 *Nov 4, 1980Feb 8, 1983Atlantic Pipe CorporationPrecast concrete structural unit and composite wall structure
US4416097 *Nov 16, 1977Nov 22, 1983Weir Richard LUniversal beam construction system
US4627209 *Apr 15, 1985Dec 9, 1986Schwartz Ervin JInterlocking blocks and construction system comprising said blocks
US5546803 *Jun 12, 1995Aug 20, 1996Reynolds; James R.Scoop for compacting and molding masonary mixtures
US5913780 *Jan 24, 1995Jun 22, 1999Goergen; Terrence JohnMethod and device for protection against roosting birds
US5960604 *Nov 14, 1997Oct 5, 1999Blanton; C. KennethInterlocking masonry unit and wall
US6195944 *Jun 2, 1998Mar 6, 2001Valley Industries LimitedLiner
US6536170Jan 12, 2001Mar 25, 2003Joseph H. StueverManufactured home foundation
US6640514 *Oct 25, 2001Nov 4, 2003Guibert JeromeModular wall or double wall element for dry assembly
US6681542 *Nov 7, 2001Jan 27, 2004King's Material, Inc.Stair block for use in landscaping and method for use thereof
US6851242 *Jul 3, 2002Feb 8, 2005John WeatherstonRaised garden block
US6883281 *Sep 7, 1999Apr 26, 2005Hector E. Chavez-GandaraMultiuse construction system: multispace 2000
US8667751Nov 17, 2010Mar 11, 2014Wood WaySet of elements for constructing a wooden wall and method for using such elements
US8887466 *May 13, 2011Nov 18, 2014Arturo Ramon Alvarez MoysenSystem for constructing walls using blocks equipped with coupling means
US20050183363 *Mar 24, 2003Aug 25, 2005Meir SilberPrefabricated tower foundation comprising equipment shelters and a method for its deployment on site
US20060059824 *Sep 15, 2004Mar 23, 2006Austin BarbischBlock structure
US20090218920 *Apr 6, 2007Sep 3, 2009Itiesse S. R. L.Modular System for Realising Furnishing Elements
US20140007529 *May 13, 2011Jan 9, 2014Arturo Ramon Alvarez MoysenSystem for constructing walls using blocks equipped with coupling means
CN101899806A *Aug 19, 2010Dec 1, 2010北京四方如钢混凝土制品有限公司Gutter inlet end module
EP0728878A1 *Feb 23, 1996Aug 28, 1996Firma Gianazza Angelo S.p.A.Prefabricated synthetic material interlocking building element for walls
EP1293623A1 *Oct 22, 2001Mar 19, 2003Manuela SchneiderMethod and system for constructing buildings
WO1980001185A1 *Dec 7, 1979Jun 12, 1980Paulding TImproved precast concrete structural unit and composite wall structure
WO2011061445A1 *Nov 17, 2010May 26, 2011Jean-Pierre LadvieSet of elements for constructing a wooden wall and method for using such elements
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/592.3, D25/118, 52/745.2, 52/125.2, 52/283, 52/97, 52/208, 52/223.7, 52/293.2, 52/309.11, 52/300, 52/749.13, 52/606, 52/745.11
International ClassificationE04B2/16, E04B5/08, E04B1/02, E04B2/14, E04B2/02, E04B1/04, E04G21/14
Cooperative ClassificationE04B5/08, E04B2/16, E04B1/04, E04G21/14, E04B2002/0217
European ClassificationE04G21/14, E04B1/04, E04B5/08, E04B2/16