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Publication numberUS3478747 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 18, 1969
Filing dateMay 3, 1968
Priority dateMay 29, 1967
Publication numberUS 3478747 A, US 3478747A, US-A-3478747, US3478747 A, US3478747A
InventorsSachs Charles M
Original AssigneeInt Playtex Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Brassiere
US 3478747 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 18, 1969 c. M. SACHS 3,478,747

' BRASSIERE Original Fi led May 29, 1967 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR CHARL E5 M 5210/15 ATT EY Nov. 18, 1969 Original Filed May 29., we?

C;- M. SACHS BRASSIERE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR CHARLES M 5407/5 ATTO :"gv

United States Patent 3,478,747 BRASSIERE Charles M. Sachs, Teaneck, N.J., assignor to International Playtex Corporation, a corporation of Delaware Original application May 29, 1967, Ser. No. 642,035, now

Patent No. 3,381,689. Divided and this application May 3, 1968, Ser. No. 726,280

Int. Cl. A41c 3/00 U.S. Cl. 128-483 3 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A brassiere that accommodates to chest cavity expansion and contracting particularly with respect to the area of the body just below the breasts. It utilizes a substantially non-stretch, triangular-shaped, mesh-like piece of fabric on-the-bias so that when the brassiere experiences girthwise stress, a biasing stretch within said triangular fabric is produced in the girthwise drection which permits the brassiere to accommodate to chest cavity expansion and contraction and maintain it in proper position on the body during use.

This application is a division of my co-pending application Ser. No. 642,035, filed May 29, 1967, now U.S. Letters Patent No. 3,381,689.

This invention is a brassiere designed and constructed to expand with the chest when the wearer breathes and moves about, and yet minimize upward and downward movement from its proper position on the body.

A brassiere must not only support and shape the breasts but it must also accommodate to the constantly expanding and contracting of the wearers chest as she breathes, moves her arms and indulges in other body motions. Each change in chest size and shape requires an accommodating change in the brassiere size and shape, particularly with respect to the area of the body just below the breasts. The more nearly perfectly the brassiere accommodates to changes in size and shape of the wearers chest, the better the brassiere.

When the wearers chest expands or contracts, which occurs during normal breathing and other normal body movements, the brassiere merely tends to move up or down the chest wall in its efiort to accommodate to chest expansion or contraction; but when chest expansion or contraction is excessive, the brassiere actually slides upwardly or downwardly. It is desirable for comfort and control purposes, that the amount of upward and downward brassiere movement is minimized; and when the wearers chest returns to its relaxed size and shape, that the brassiere returns to its proper position on the body.

It is difiicult to achieve brassiere accommodation particularly around the lower half of the periphery of the breasts. In this area of the body, if the brassiere moves up and out it can ride off the chest wall and up onto the protuberance of the breast, causing discomfort and a feeling of insecurity; or if it moves down the chest wall, it flattens the breasts, again causing discomfort and also loss of desired breast separation and shaping. The upward or downward movement problem can, of course, be solved by providing a very tight underbust band. That, however, merely substitutes one undesirable feature for another.

A brassiere constructed in accordance with my invention surprisingly accommodates to changes in chest size and shape as the wearer breathes and moves about, thus alleviating undesirable upward and downward movements of the brassiere from its proper position, yet adequately supports and shapes the breasts.

In a preferred embodiment of my invention, a brassiere is provided with a stretchable underbust band extending across under the cups, a pair of tapes secured to the inner 3,478,747 Patented Nov. 18, 1969 edges of the cups, so as to form upper branches above the center of the brassiere and lower branches below it that extend to the underbust band, and a triangular piece of mesh-like fabric positioned in the space between the lower branches of the tapes and the underbust band. The triangular piece of fabric has a group of parallel strands extending in one direction and a group of parallel strands extending in a direction substantially perpendicular to the first group of parallel strands. I secure the triangular piece of fabric to the lower branches of said tapes and the underbust band so that each group of parallel strands is at an angle to the horizontal plane of the underbust band. I have found it preferable to make the angle between any one group of parallel strands and the horizontal plane of the underbust band between 20 to 70 degrees.

Proceeding now to a more detailed description of my invention, reference will be had to the accompanying drawings which are too illustrative and not limitative of my invention.

FIGURE 1 is a front elevation of a preferred embodiment of my brassiere as seen on the wearer;

FIGURE 2 is a slightly enlarged plan view of the center section of the brassiere of FIGURE 1 when it is not on the wearer but in a relaxed condition;

FIGURE 3 is a 17.5 enlargement of approximately a 3 mm. circular area of the triangular, mesh-like piece of fabric at the center of the brassiere of FIGURE 1, when it is not on the wearer but in a relaxed condition.

FIGURE 4 is a slightly enlarged plan view of the center section of the brassiere of FIGURE 1 when it is on the body and under slight tension;

FIGURE 5 is a 17.5 enlargement of approximately a 3 mm. circular area of the triangular, mesh-like piece of fabric at the center of the brassiere of FIGURE 1 when it is on the body and under slight tension;

FIGURE 6 is a front elevation of a second embodiment of my brassiere as seen on the wearer; and

FIGURE 7 is a front elevation of a third embodiment of my brassiere as seen on the wearer.

It is to be understood that my brassiere may have any known or suitable dorsal band arrangement and shoulder straps; these are not the subject of my invention, and as they are conventional they are merely indicated here.

Referring to the drawings, my brassiere has cups 10, 12 of a conical to hemispherical shape, each cup having an upper half 14, 16, a lower half 18, 20, and a generally horizontal mid-seam 22, 24. The members making up the cups are, as it usual, cut with convex edges that are pulled to each other, overlapped, and sewn together to form the mid-seam, thus providing outwardly peaked cups.

Extending from the top of the cups 10, 12 and along the upper-inner edges thereof are narrow tapes 26, 28. These tapes cross each other at midpoint 42 and then extend along the lower-inner edges of the cups. The upper ends of tapes 26, 28 are conventionally secured to shoulder strap buckles 30, 32 and shoulder straps 31, 33.

Tapes 26, 28 have upper branches 34, 36, which are respectively secured to the upper-inner edge regions of the cups 10, 12 and lower branches 38, 40 which are respectively secured to the lower-inner edge regions of cups 10, 12. These tapes are preferably secured to each other at the crossing or midpoint 42.

The upper branches 34, 36 of the tapes overlap-by about half their width-the upper-inner edge region of the cups 10, 12, and are secured to them by preferably a double line of stitching 44, 46. Each tape is slightly extended as it is sewn to its corresponding cup. This results in a finished product which at rest is slightly gathered along that edge. It is thus capable of a small degree of stretch. The portion of each tape that extends past the edge of the cup more readily adapts itself to the body in that region, and lies lightly but snugly against the skin.

Below the midpoint 42, the lower branches 38, 40 also overlap the lower-inner edge region of the cups 10, 12. These lower branches of the tapes 26, 28 are also secured to the cups 10, 12 by preferably a double line of stitching 44, 46, with the lower edge of the tapes being sewn to the cups 10, 12.

The upper branches 34, 36 of the tapes 26, 28 extend freely out away from the cups 10, 12, whereas the lower branches 38, 40 of the tapes 26, 28 extend freely in over the cups 10, 12, The double line of stitching 44, 46 also securely fastens the tapes to each other where they cross at the midpoint 42.

Although tapes 26, 28 are inherently straight, the lower branches 38, 40 are slightly bent inwardly when sewn to the shaped cups 10, 12, thus resulting in the lower branches 38, 40 being less divergent than the upper branches 34, 36. This relationship tends to be confirmed and enhanced when the brassiere is on the body.

At the lower center of the brassiere is a triangular piece of mesh-like fabric 48, which is also sewn to the lower branches 38, 40 of tapes 26, 28 and to the lower-inner edges of the cups 10, 12. The triangular fabric 48 is made from a sheet of fabric that has a first group of nonstretchable, spaced-apart fibre strands extending in one direction and a second group of nonstretchable, spaced-apart fibre strands extending in a direction substantially perpendicular to the first group of strands. This material may be fabricated by well-known weaving, knitting or other nonstretch fabric formation techniques.

It is an essential feature of my invention that the triangular piece of fabric is fabricated so that the perpendicular groups of fibre strands are each at an angle to the base of the triangle, preferably at a forty-five degree angle, or as is commonly referred to in the art, the triangular piece of fabric is cut-on-the-bias. By this construction, my triangular-shaped, otherwise nonstretchable piece of fabric is advantageously stretchable in a direction parallel to its base.

Across the front of the brassiere and under the cups 10, 12 extends an underbust band 50, which is preferably stretchable in the girthwise direction. This band may be made of elastic material. It is secured to the lower edges of the cups 10, 12, the lower branches 38, 40 and the triangular fabric 48. Preferably, the top quarter inch or so of the underbust band overlaps-and is sewn to--the cups, lower branches of the tapes and the triangular fabric.

In the center region of the underbust band 50, girthwise stretchability is preserved by virtue of the fact that it is sewn to the base of the triangular fabric 48, which is oriented to provide girthwise stretch by zig-zag stitching. Girthwise stretchability at the outer regions of the underbust band 50 is restrained since it is sewn to the lower edges of the cups 10, 12, which are virtually nonstretchable in the girthwise direction. It is preferably, however, to preserve a slight amount of girthwise stretchability at the outer regions of the underbust band 50. This may be achieved by slightly extending the band as it is sewn with zig-zag stitching-to the cups, thus resulting in a finished product which is slightly gathered along the sewn edges. The underbust band 50 is thus capable of a small degree of girthwise stretch in its outer regions.

It is well known in the brassiere art that the upperhalf of a brassiereabove the sternumtends to stay in its proper position on the body while the lower-half of the brassiere is more inclined to move out of position, generally upward when the chest wall expands and downward when it contracts. This action of a brassiere on the body is caused by the fact that the chest cavity of a woman expands less above the sternum than it does below the sternum. It is at the lower, front-center, just below the sternum that the chest cavity has its greatest degree of expansion. My brassiere has a unique capability of accommodating to chest cavity expansion at its lower, frontcenter section, yet it does not require additional costly stretch fabrics in this section of the brassiere,

In the embodiment illustrated, the underbust band 50 is coterminous with the outer edges of the cups 10, Hand both are joined to the dorsal band members 52, 54 of any desired nature. When the underbust band is assembled into the composite front panel it is curved on a downwardly concave arc. Desirably, the lower edges of the dorsal band members 52, 54 when the brassiere is laid out flat, continue this same downwardly concave arc; so that the dorsal bands will substantially lie straight across the wearers back when the brassiere is on the body.

To more clearly set forth my invention, I include FIGURES 3 and 4 which are respectively enlarged plan views of the lower, front-center section of my brassiere, when it is in a relaxed condition off the body, and when it is an expanded or stressed condition on the body.

In FIGURE 2, portions of the brassiere of FIGURE 1 are shown when the brassiere is in a relaxed condition, the reference numerals being used for like parts. Note here that the group of spaced strands that run upwardly and to the right is substantially perpendicular to the group of spaced strands that run upwardly and to the left. The two groups of strands form a plurality of substantially rectangular openings with each group of strands oriented at an angle to the upper edge of the underbust band 50. Preferably these angles are forty-five degrees, although thirty to sixty degrees is a permissive and acceptable range of angles.

In FIGURE 4, portions of the brassiere of FIGURE 1 are shown when the brassiere is under girthwise stress or stretch, like reference numerals being used for like parts. Note here that the group of spaced strands that run upwardly and to the right are no longer perpendicular to the group of strands that run upwardly and to the left. The two groups of strands now form a plurality of variably shaped openings of parallelogram configuration, with each group of strands still oriented at an angle to the upper edge of the underbust band 50. The upper and lower angles of the parallelograms vary from about 90 degrees to about 110 degrees under varying degrees of stress, while the left and right angles of the parallelograms vary from about 90 degrees to about degrees.

Note at this point that the base length of the triangular fabric 48, shown as length X between center-lines aa and b-b, of the at-rest brassiere of FIGURE 2, enlarges or bias-stretches to a larger base length, as shown as length Y between center-lines aa' and bb of FIG- URE 4. This bias-stretch capability is possible because of the orientation of the groups of strands of the triangular fabric 48 with respect to the upper edge of the underbust band 50, i.e., it is cut on-the-bias, and because the underbust band is at least stretchable in its central region between the cups.

To even more clearly define my invention, I also include a 17.5 enlargement of one rectangle of FIGURE 2 and one parallelogram of FIGURE 4, which are respectively FIGURES 3 and 5 In FIGURE 3, the enlarged rectangle has sides 60, 62, 64, and 66, upper angle 61 and side angle 63. Angles 61, 63 are each approximately degrees while the sides are approximately equal in length. In FIGURE 5, however, the enlarged parallelograma rectangle under girthwise stress-has sides 60, 62, 64, and 66', still approximately equal in length, but the upper angle 61' is larger than upper angle 61 and the side angle 63 is smaller than the side angle 63. It is the capability of the rectangles of the triangular fabric 48 to change into parallelograms that permits bias-stretch in the girthwise direction when the brassiere is subjected to girthwise stretch. To say it otherwise, the interstices between the spaced strands of the triangular fabric 48 cant when subjected to girthwise stress, thus imparting an accumulative elongation of the triangular fabric in the girthwise direction. Such elongation capability is advantageously utilized to allow the brassiere to accommodate to chest cavity expansions,

particularly in the lower, front-center region of the brassiere.

A first alternate embodiment of my invention is shown in FIGURE 6. Cups 10, 12, shoulder strap buckles 30, 32, shoulder straps 31, 33, triangular fabric 48, underbust band 50 and dorsal bands 52, 54 are substantially identical to corresponding elements above described. Tapes 26', 28 are different from the above described tapes 26, 28 in that tape 26' extends from the top of cup 10, along-and secured to--the upper-inner edge of cup and then along and secured to the lower-inner edge of cup 10. Tape 28 is similarly secured to cup 12 in that it extends from the top thereof, along the upper-inner edge, then along the lower-inner edge, and secured thereto. Upper branches 34, 36' above the mid-point 42, and lower branches 38', 40' below it are therefore provided. At the mid-point 42 where the tapes 26, 28 vertically abut, they may be secured together, for example, by vertically extending ladder stitches (not shown).

Tapes 26', 28 overlap the inner edge region of their respective cup and are secured there by two spaced rows of stitches 44, 46. Preferably these tapes are substantially non-stretchable, although lengthwise stretchable tapes may be used.

A second alternate embodiment of my invention is shown in FIGURE 7 in which the cups, shoulder strap buckles, shoulder straps, triangular fabric, underbust band and dorsal bands are substantially identical to corresponding elements above described.

The tapes 2-6", 28" are different from the abovedescribed tapes 26, 28 in that tape 26" extends from the top of cup 10, along and secured to the upper-inner edge of cup 10, across the mid-point 42, then along the upper-inner edge of cup 12, terminating at the top thereof. Tape 28" extends from the underbust band 50, along and secured to the lower-inner edge of cup 10, across the mid-point 42, then along the lower-inner edge of cup 12, terminating at the underbust band 50. Upper branches 34", 36" above the mid-point 42, and lower branches 38", 40 below it are provided. At the mid-point 42 where the tapes 26", 28" abut, they may be secured together, for example, by ladder stitches (not shown) or they may overlap and be secured by conventional stitches.

Tape 26" overlaps by about half its width, the upperinner edge region of the cups 10, 12 and is secured to them by preferably a double line of stitching 44" in a manner similar to that above described with regard to tapes 26, 28 of FIGURE 1. Tape 28" overlaps the lowerinner edge region of the cups 10, 12 and is secured there by two spaced rows of stitches 46".

Preferably tape 26" is lengthwise stretchable while tape 28" is substantially non-stretchable.

It will be appreciated that since the cups, tapes, triangular fabric and underbust band accommodate to and follow the natural expansion of the chest cavity, yet simply abut the body, the brassiere as an entity moves with the chest cavity during normal body motions and returns to very nearly its proper position on the body after excessive body movements, thus providing a highly satisfactory combination of brassiere adaptability and restoration.

I claim:

1. Brassiere in which:

(a) two cups are provided; and

(b) a continuous unitary stretchable underbust band of essentially uniform width throughout its length extends across under the cups and is secured to the bottom edges of the cups; and

i (c) a pair of tapes are secured to the inner edges of the cups, said tapes forming upper branches above the center of the brassiere and lower branches below it with the bottom ends of said lower branches extending down to the underbust band and being secured there; and

(d) an essentially uniform, triangular-shaped, piece of substantially non-stretch, mesh-like fabric is positioned on the bias with respect to the horizontal edge of said underbust band in the space between the lower branches of said tapes and said underbust band, with the three edges of said fabric being respectively secured to the inner edges of the lower branches of said tapes and the upper edge of said underbust band;

(e) whereby girthwise stretching of said underbust band during use produces a bias stretch within said fabric in the girthwise direction, which in cooperation with the girthwise-stretch in the underbust band, permits said brassiere to accommodate the expansion and contraction of the chest cavity and to maintain its proper position on the body during use.

2. Brassiere in which:

(a) two cups are provided; and

(b) a continuous unitary stretchable underbust band of essentially uniform width throughout its length extends across under the cups and is secured to the bottom edges of the cups; and

(c) a pair of tapes are secured to the inner edges of the cups, said tapes forming upper branches above the center of the brassiere and lower branches below it with the bottom ends of said lower branches extending down to the underbust band and being secured there; and

(d) an essentially uniform, triangular-shaped, piece of fabric is positioned in the space between the lower branches of said tapes and said underbust band, with the three edges of said triangular piece of fabric being respectively secured to the inner edges of the lower branches of said tapes and the upper edge of said underbust band; and

(c) said triangular piece of fabric has a first group of spaced strands generally extending in one direction and a second group of spaced strands generally extending in a direction transverse to said one direction; and

(f) said triangular piece of fabric is secured to said lower branches and said underbust band so that each group of strands are at an angle to the horizontal edge of said underbust band; and

(g) whereby girthwise stretching of said underbust band during use produces a bias stretch within said fabric in the girthwise direction, which in cooperation with the girthwise stretch in the underbust band, permits said brassiere to accommodate to expansion and contraction of the chest cavity and to maintain its proper position on the body during use.

3. In a brassiere of the type having a front section with a dorsal band arrangement and shoulder straps each respectively secured thereto for permittin brassiere accommodation to chest cavity expansion and contraction and for providing desirable breast separation, said front section comprising:

(a) two cups, y

(b) an underbust band extending across under the cups and being secured to the bottom edges of the cups, the underbust band having at least a portion thereof of substantially continuous unitary stretchability which is essentially of uniform construction and width throughout its length;

(c) a pair of tapes secured to the inner edges of the cups and secured to each other, said tapes defining upper diverging branches above their point of securement and lower diverging branches below it;

(d) an essentially uniform substantially triangular insert, which is stretchable at least in a girthwise direction, positioned in the space between the lower branches of the tapes and the underbust band with the three edges of said triangular insert being respectively secured to the inner edges of the lower branches of the tapes and the upper edge of the un- 7 derbust band, the bottom ends of said lower branches extending down to the underbust band and being secured thereto near the lower apices of the triangular insert intermediate the center and terminal portions of the underbust band.

(e) whereby girthwise stretching of said nnderbust band during use produces a bias stretch within said insert in the girthwise direction, which in cooperation with the girthwise stretch in the underbust band, permits said brassiere to accommodate to expansion and contraction of the chest cavity and to maintain its proper position on the body during use; and

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 5/1968 Sachs 138483 ADELE M. EAGER, Primary Examiner Disclaimer 3, 78,7l7.-Charles M. Sachs, Teaneck, NJ. BRASSIERE. Patent dated Nov.

18, 1969. Disclaimer filed Dec. 29, 1969, by the assignee, International Playtex Corpomtion.

Hereby disclaims the termin quent to May 30, 1984.

[Ofiicz'al Gazette March 31, 1970.]

al portion of the term of said patent subse-

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3381689 *May 29, 1967May 7, 1968Internat Playtex CorpBrassiere
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3771528 *May 25, 1972Nov 13, 1973May JBrassiere
US3982547 *Jun 11, 1975Sep 28, 1976Amy Thelma WalkerSkirt, or slacks supporting brassiere
US4804351 *Nov 16, 1987Feb 14, 1989Raml Nancy MSurgical brassiere
US7438625Jul 28, 2004Oct 21, 2008Hbi Branded Apparel Enterprises, LlcCentral gore with crossed pieces and powernet construction
Classifications
U.S. Classification450/59
International ClassificationA41C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41C3/00
European ClassificationA41C3/00