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Publication numberUS3478807 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 18, 1969
Filing dateMay 22, 1967
Priority dateMay 22, 1967
Publication numberUS 3478807 A, US 3478807A, US-A-3478807, US3478807 A, US3478807A
InventorsHertzberg Samuel
Original AssigneeHertzberg Samuel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stanchion support apparatus for a pair of curtain traverse rods with draw cords
US 3478807 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 18. 1969 s HERTZBERG 3,478,807

STANCHION SUPPORT APPARATUS FOR A PAIR OF CURTAIN TRAVERSE RODS WITH DRAW CORDS Filed May 22, 1967 a FIGZA Mn L Q5 or 46 52 or 53 I N VEN TOR.

SAMUEL HERTZBERG United States Patent US. Cl. 160-344 5 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A hollow stanchion support for positioning and securing on one side a pair of curtain traverse rods with draw cords horizontally one below the other. One end of each traverse rod penetrates into the stanchion interior through a rod opening in the stanchion wall, permitting the draw cords to be suspended in the stanchion interior. An align ment opening permits adjustments in the stanchion interior. In a stanchion of multi-sided longitudinal configuration, the alignment opening consists of one side missing, the sides adjacent the missing side having wing extensions providing the means of attachment to a complementary wall surface. There are draw cord opening means in the stanchion to provide manipulating access to the draw cords consisting either of draw cord opening holes or of longitudinal slit draw cord openings. The latter form includes a tongue at the lower extremity of the stanchion to which are attached pulleys on which the draw cords are held taut and knob means (for manipulating the draw cords) mounted to the longitudinal slit draw cord openings and attached through them to the draw cords. Stanchion material displaced in the formation of the longitudinal slit draw cord openings is bent inward to provide slit tracks for the knob means. Caps of a configuration conforming to the stanchion extremities seal the stanchion ends and permit minor adjustments in the visible length of the stanchion apparatus.

My invention visualizes two stanchions, upright structures attachable to a complementary surface (usually a wall adjacent a window), which secure and support in rod openings a pair of curtain traverse rods with draw cords in functioning horizontal positions one below the other. One of the stanchions, on which the claims read, is hollow and receives the draw cords of both traverse rods in its interior, permitting manipulating access to the draw cords through draw cord opening means consisting either of draw cord opening holes or longitudinal slit draw cord openings, Additionally, the latter form includes a tongue at the lower extremity of the stanchion to which are attached pulleys on which the draw cords are held taut and knob means (for manipulating the draw cords) mounted to the longitudinal slit draw cord openings and attached through them to the draw cords. The draw cord opening means are close enough to each other to permit the draw cords to be manipulated either jointly or individually; and the curtains (when hung) may thereby either be opened or closed together or separately, entirely or partially, by simple hand movements.

Windows are fitted with structures-Venetian blinds, shades, curtains, draperies (often in combination)- usually designed to be at once decorative and utilitarian. Among the utilitarian factors are the desire for privacy and for shade, light and ventilation. The realization of these utilitarian aims (often conflicting) by the conventional means enumerated may be a frustrating experience.

A closed Venetian blind, for instance, provides privacy and shade but seriously interferes with the lighting and 3,478,807 Patented Nov. 18, 1969 ventilation of a room. Compromise solutions are, therefore, often improvised. The Venetian blind may be fixed in the open position, while the slats in the lower half may be individually changed to the closed positions. Similarly, the Venetian blind may be closed, while the slats in the lower half may be individually changed to the open positions. This is an annoying transaction for many people.

Furthermore, Venetian blinds get dirty; and when they do, they pose a troublesome cleaning problem.

In many homes, detachable window shades are now substituted for Venetian blinds, particularly for the latter reason, since these are now available in washable varieties. But such shades are less versatile than Venetian blinds when it is desired to leave them partially open; for this can only be done with the top closed and the bottom open. Thus, what is gained in one respect is lost in another. And to provide separate shades for the upper and lower halves of a window-which is possible-not only involves additional expense while detracting from the attractiveness of a room, but introduces as well the possibility of a troublesome encounter with a double set of shade pulls.

A window fitted with upper and lower curtains which partially overlap and which are translucent, if hung on separate traverse rods with draw cords, would represent a superior compromise solution. The usual support brackets supplied with such traverse rods, of which there are suflicient varieties to solve almost any hanging problem, could probably be utilized. Such brackets may, however, be considered unattractive if unduly exposed. Additionally, the proliferation of draw cords (especially if they are severed into separated open and close pulls) could cause confusion, particularly since the usual design encourages concealment of the draw cords behind a longitudinal curtain edge.

One object of my invention, therefore, is to invite the substitution of translucent curtains hung on parallel traverse rods with draw cords (the upper curtain somewhat overlapping the lower one), providing thereby units easily washed or cleaned which can be readily opened or closed independently of each other in accordance with the needs for privacy, shade, light, and ventilation.

Another object is to provide a secure and stable supporting apparatus for such an arrangement of curtains, an arrangement at once inexpensive, attractive and easy to install.

A third object is to obviate the confusion created by the multiplication of draw cords; to make it possible with ease to select the correct open or close pull.

A fourth object is to make it possible simultaneously to adjust the two curtains to almost any desired combination of positions.

In the accompanying drawing there is revealed an illustrative embodiment of the invention from which these and other objects, novel features and advantages will be readily apparent.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a view in perspective of a window set in a window recess and is intended to assist in identifying complementary surfaces suitable for the attachment of the apparatus which is the subject of this invention;

FIGS. 2A-2E illustrate, part in plan and part in perspective, a pair of stanchions (and various of their elements) as they are designed to function attached to complementary surfaces inside a window recess;

FIGS. 3A-3D indicate, in perspective and in cross section, assembled and disassembled, the longitudinal slit draw cord openings and the knob means which cooperatively provide manipulating access to the draw cords; and

FIGS. 4A4C show in perspective and in plan, alternative methods of securing manipulating access to the draw cords.

Complementary surfaces to which the stanchions of my invention may be attached is the subject of FIG. 1. We see there a window 78 set in a window recess with opposed window recess walls 43, 44. and 57, 79. A wall edge 80 marks the division between the window recess wall 43 and the adjacent room wall surface 76. A wall edge 81 similarly separates the window recess wall 44 from the adjacent room wall surface 77. Attention is particularly directed to the opposed window recess walls 43, 44 and the room wall surfaces 76, 77 (on a common plane) as suitable paired complementary surfaces.

The plan view of FIG. 2A indicates a stanchion support apparatusas it would appear attached to the opposed window recess walls 43 and 44. A stanchion 1 has a side 2 visible, with an upper cap 8 sealing the upper extremity of which an edge side 9 can be seen and a lower cap 15 of which an edge side 16 can be seen (the lower cap 15 sealing the lower extremity of the stanchion 1). A stanchion 21 has a side 22 visible; an upper cap 31, of which an edge side 32 can be discerned, seals the upper extremity and a lower cap 15, of which an edge side 18 can be seen, seals the lower extremity. Additionally, the stanchion 21 side 22 reveals on its surface the longitudinal slit draw cord openings 28 and 29, each with a knob means 30 mounted thereon. Finally, secured and supported horizontally by the stanchions 1 and 21 are the upper curtain traverse rod 38 and the lower curtain traverse rod 39 (with the respective draw cords 40 and 41 in the interior of the stanchion 21 and, consequently, not visible here).

FIG. 2B illustrates in perspective the stanchion 1 as it would appear attached to a complementary surface, the window recess wall 43, by screws emanating from the tiny holes 42 of the wing extensions 6 and 7. The upper cap 8 and the lower cap 15 would normally have to be seated first in the respective stanchion 1 extremities because of the interference of the opposed Window recess walls 57, 79; but they are here omitted in order to indicate more exactly the structure of the stanchion 1. The stanchion 1 is revealed as hollow and of multi-sided longitudinal configuration with sides 2, 3 and 4. Side is missing and thereby provides for an alignment opening 5 (of no particular value in the stanchion 1). Emanating from the sides adjacent to the alignment opening 5, at the seam 49 and perpendicular to the side 2 is the wing extension 6 and at the seam 50 and perpendicular to the side 4 isthe wing extension 7. The wing extensions 6 and 7, in addition to the aforementioned tiny holes 42 have seam slits 48 at the upper and lower extremities of the stanchion 1 along the seams 49 and 50 (which function with the caps 8 and 15) and fastening slits 51 at the lower extremity of the stanchion 1 (which function with the lower cap 15). The rod openings 45 and 46 on side 3 are respectively designed to receive, secure and support the rod ends 47 of the curtain traverse rods 38 and 39 (see FIG. 2B). It is to be noted that though the rod openings 45 and 46 are positioned one below the other, they are placed so that the curtain traverse rod 39 would be somewhat back of the curtain traverse rod 38 allowing the upper curtain (when hung) to fall in a forward and slightly overlapping position vis-a-vis the lower curtain (when hung).

FIG. 2C defines, in perspective, the stanchion 21 as it would appear attached to the opposed complementary surface, the window recess wall 44, by screws emanating from the tiny holes 42 of the wing extensions 26 and 27. The upper cap 31 and the lower cap 15 are (as with the stanchion 1, and for the same reason) omitted. The stanchion 21, like the stanchion 1, is hollow and of multisided longitudinal configuration with sides 22, 23 and 24. Side 25 is missing and, accordingly, provides for an alignment opening 25 (which is mandatory if necessary adjustments of the draw cords 40 and 41 within the stanchion 21, the subject of FIGURES 3 and 4, are to be made). Projecting from the sides adjacent the alignment opening 25, at the seam 55 and perpendicular to the side 22 is the wing extension 26 and at the seam 56 and perpendicular to the side 24 is the wing extension 27. These wing extensions 26 and 27, in addition to the tiny holes 42, have seam slits 48 and fastening slits 51 (positioned comparably to those of the stanchion 1). The rod openings 52 and 53 on side 23 are directly opposed to the rod openings 45 and 46 of stanchion 1, and are respectively designed to receive, secure and support the rod ends 54 of the curtain traverse rods 38 and 39 (see FIGURES 2E, 3A and 4A). The longitudinal slit draw cord openings 28 and 29 are visible on side 22.

The upper cap 8, intended as a seal for the upper extremity of the stanchion 1, is of multi-sided configuration conforming to that of the stanchion 1. The external view in perspective of FIG. 2D indicates edge sides 9, 11, 12, a winged edge side 10, and a top side 14. The edge side 12 has a cutaway 13 which leaves exposed the rod opening 45 when the upper cap 8 is fitted to the stanchion 1. The sealing process, incidentally, requires that the winged edge side 10 be inserted into the seam slits 48 of the stanchion 1, bridging the alignment opening 5. Preferably, though this is not mandatory, the edge sides 9, 11, 12 should hug the outside rather than the inside of the stanchion 1.

The upper cap 31, the seal for the upper extremity of the stanchion 21, is of multi-sided configuration conforming to the design of the latter. FIG. 2D gives an external view in perspective of the said cap 31, indicating edge sides 32, 34 and 35, a winged edge side 33, and a top side 37. The edge side 35 has a cutaway 36 in accomodation to the rod opening 52 of the stanchion 21 side 23. The sealing process, as with the companion upper cap 8, requires that the winged edge side 33 be fitted into the seam slits 48 of the stanchion 21, bridging the alignment opening 25. Following the practice adopted with the upper cap 8, the edge sides 32, 34 and 35 should be fitted to the outside of the stanchion 21 upper extremity.

FIG. 2D also illustrates in perspective (this time giving an inside view) the lower cap 15, the lower extremities of the stanchions 1 and 21 both sealed by their respective examples. We note the inside faces of the edge side 16, the winged edge side 19 and the top side 20 and the outer faces of the edge sides 17 and 18. In the manner already prescribed, the winged edge sides 19 should be inserted into the seam slits 48 of the lower extremities of the stanchions 1 and 21, bridging the respective alignment openings 5 and 25, and the edge sides 16, 17 and 18 fitted to the exteriors of the lower extremities of the stanchions 1 and 21. When attached to the complementary surfaces (the window recess walls 43 and 44), it may be discovered that the stanchions 1 and 21 do not quite reach down to the window recess wall 57. In that event, if the deficiencies are smaller than the depths of the lower caps 15, the said lower caps 15 may be pushed down till their top sides 20 are in contact with the Window recess wall 57. The fastening slits 51, located in the lower extremities of the stanchions 1 and 21 in the paired wing extensions 6, 7 and 26, 27, are provided against this eventuality. They will permit the attaching screws, as they are forced through the tiny holes 42 of the winged edge sides 19 of the lower caps 15, to penetrate unimpeded into the window recess walls 43 and 44.

The method here utilized by which the stanchions 1 and 21 cooperate to secure and support the curtain traverse rods 38 and 39 is the subject of the plan view of FIG. 2E. A stanchion 1 section at a rod opening 45 or 46 is opposed by a stanchioin 21 section at the corresponding rod opening 52 or 53. The traverse rod end 47 of the curtain traverse rod 38 or 39 is forced through the rod opening 45 or 46 in the stanchion 1 side 3 as far as the overlapping flange 58 will allow, thereby penetrating into the alignment opening 5 but not reaching the window recess Wall 43. The draw cord 40 or 41 of the traverse rod 38 or 39 is next passed through the rod opening 52 or 53 in the stanchion 21 side 23, immediately followed by the traverse rod end 54 as far as the overlapping flange 58 will permit. Thereby, the traverse rod end 54 penetrates into the alignment opening but does not reach the window recess wall 44. A more detailed description of the curtain traverse rods 38 and 39 is not indicated since these are conventional rods of a type familiar to most persons, and no claims are made for them per se.

It is well to note at this point that the stanchions 1 and 21, slightly modified in structure, can be attached to the complementary surfaces provided by the room wall surfaces 76 and 77 adjacent the respective wall edges 80 and 81. These modifications follow: the stanchion 1 side 4, instead of the indicated side 3, would have to provide the rod openings 45 and 46; the upper cap 8 must have the cutaway 13 on the edge side 11 instead of the edge side 12; the stanchion 21 must have the rod openings 52 and 53 on side 24 instead of side 23; and the upper cap 31 must have the cutaway 36 on edge side 34 instead of edge side 35.

In FIG. 3A there is a view in perspective of the ad jacent inner sides 22 and 23 of the stanchion 21 intended to illustrate how manipulating access to the draw cords 40 and 41 is achieved. All the adjustments required are possible through the alignment opening 25 and must be completed before the stanchion 21 is attached to its complementary surface, the window recess wall 44.

As seen in FIG. 3A, the traverse rod end 54 of the curtain traverse rod 38 is in the alignment opening 25 of the stanchion 21 secured and supported at the rod opening 52. Its draw cord 40 is suspended within the alignment opening 25, maintained taut between the tra verse rod end 54, a pulley 60 attached to the tongue 61 (which is an extension of the stanchion 21, in this instance of the side 23, bent inward), and the inner portion of a knob means mounted to the longitudinal slit draw cord opening 28. The traverse rod end 54 of the curtain traverse rod 39 is also within the stanchion 21 alignment opening 25, secured and supported at the rod opening 53. Its draw cord 41 is similarly suspended, maintained taut between the traverse rod end 54 of the curtain traverse rod 39, a second pulley 60 attached to the tongue 61, and the inner portion of ,a second knob means 30 mounted to the longitudinal slit draw cord opening 29. I

FIG. 3A shows in perspective a portion of the inner side 22 of the stanchion 21 defining a longitudinal slit draw cord opening 28 or 29. It will be observed that in forming the longitudinal slit draw cord openings 28 and 29, the side 22 material displaced in each instance is not eliminated but is rather bent inward to shape two slit tracks 62 which are perpendicular to the inner side 22. It is feasible, though not preferable, to shape a single slit track 62 rather than two for each of the longitudinal slit draw cord openings 28 and 29.

Manipulating access to the draw cords and 41 is provided by the knob means 30, mounted to each of the longitudinal slit draw cord openings 28 and 29 and attached through them to the respective draw cords 40 and 41. Accordingly, a knob means 30 is the subject of FIG. 3D.

The inner portion of the knob means 30, intended to provide a fastening device for firmly engaging a draw cord 40 or 41, is designed to be mounted within the alignment opening 25 of the stanchion 21 to a longitudinal slit draw cord opening 28 or 29. A member 63 (seen in perspective in FIG. 3B) has a channel 64 of generally semi-circular configugation with tiny spikes 65. The draw cord 40 or 41 is placed in the channel 64. A member 66 (seen in plain view in FIG. 30) has on its face 59 two perpendicular bolts 67; and these bolts 67 are passed through the holes 68 of the member 63 so that the face 59 presses against the draw cord 40 or 41 as it rests in the channel 64. When the nuts 69 are thereafter tightly threaded to the bolts 67, the draw cord 40 or 41 is firmly held compressed between the members 63 and 66 in the channel 64 impaled on the spikes 65.

This inner portion assembly is now related to the longitudinal slit draw cord opening 28 or 29 by orienting the face 83 of the member 66 so that the perpendicular bolt 70 projecting from it passes out of the interior of the stanchion 21 by way of the longitudinal slit draw cord opening 28 or 29 in such fashion as to permit the grooves 71 each to receive (and subsequently to slide on) a slit track 62. A circular nut 72 (indicated in FIG. 3D) is now threaded to the bolt 70 until it barely contacts the exterior surface of the side 22 of the stanchion 21. And, finally, the knob 73 (also seen in FIG. 3D) receives and holds the bolt 70, the threaded bolt opening 75 receiving the bolt 70 and the nut recess 74 accommodating the circular nut 72. It is to be noted, incidentally, that the circular nut 72 is useful but not essential since the knob 73 (with or without a nut recess 74) could by itself engage and hold the bolt 70. However, if the knob 73 were accidentally removed (which is possible), the nut 72 would still keep the inner por tion of the knob means 30 properly related to the longitudinal slit draw cord opening 28 or 29 thereby preserving manipulating access to the draw cord 40 or 41.

Before relating the knob means 30 to their respective draw cords 40 and 41, the said draw cord 40 and 41 should be manipulated so that the curtain traverse rods 38 and 39 are both in the closed position (i.e., if curtains were hung on them, these curtains would be in the closed position). The strand of the draw cord 40 of the curtain traverse rod 38 which can now be pulled down (and which will thereby open the upper curtain) is selected; and the portion most nearly adjacent to top of the longitudinal slit draw cord opening 28 is attached to a knob means 30 which thereafter is mounted to the top of the said transverse slit draw cord opening 28. The draw cord 41 of the curtain traverse rod 39 is similarly related to a knob means 30- which, in turn, is mounted to the top of the transverse slit draw cord opening 29.

With the curtain traverse rods 38 and 39 both in the closed position, with the knob means 30 at the top of the respective transverse slit draw cord openigs 28 and 29, and with a stanchion 21 side 22 width of approximately two inches, it is obvious that a single finger placed above both knobs 73 can sweep them down to open both curtains simultaneously. Conversely, with the curtains open a finger placed under the knobs 73 can raise them and thereby simultaneously close both curtains. The knobs 73 can, of course, also be manipulated individually. And, depending on the open-closed state of the curtains (and on the particular changes in this state desired), various combinations of individual and joint movements of the knobs 73 are possible and will be naturally invoked. Thus if one curtain is partially open and the other completely open, and it is desired to close both, an upward sweep of a finger will first engage the lower of the knobs 73 and subsequently engage as well the higher knob 73 as that is reached.

FIGS. 4A4C define alternative methods of achieving manipulating access to the draw cords 40 and 41, methods which dispense with the knob means 30, the pulleys 60 and the tongue 61.

FIG. 4A indicates in perspective the interior sides 22 and 23 of the stanchion 21 lacking the enumerated members. The draw cord 40 emerges outward through the transverse slit draw cord opening 28 and the draw cord 41 is similarly related to the transverse slit draw cord opening 29.

FIG. 4B represents a plan view of a portion of the exterior side 22 containing the transverse slit draw cord openings 28 and 29. The draw cord 41, seen here as it emerges from the transverse slit draw cord opening 29, has been severed into a separated open pull 41' and a close pull 41". Similarly, the draw cord 40 emerges from the transverse slit draw cord opening 28 severed into a separated open pull 40' and a close pull 40". The open pulls 40' and 41' may now be knotted or clamped together and the close pulls 40" and 41 may be similarly treated. It must be obvious that the open pulls 40' and 41' can be manipulated either individually or jointly to open the hung curtains. A like situation prevails with the close pulls 40" and 41" when the opposite result is desired.

The portion of the exterior side 22 visible in the plan view of FIG. 4C indicates four draw cord opening holes 82 substituted for the transverse slit draw cord openings 28 and 29 of FIGURES 4A and 4B. They provide, in my opinion, an improved structure for achieving manipulating access to the draw cords 40 and 41 of the type just described. For this purpose, they are neater and afford better leverage.

Having now described a stanchion support apparatus which achieves the objectives established earlier in this specification, it must be understood that modifications and adaptations may occur to those skilled in the art.

I claim:

1. In an apparatus for stabilizing a pair of curtain traverse rods with draw cords in functioning horizontal positions one below the other: a hollow stanchion of multisided longitudinal configuration except for an alignment opening consisting of one side missing, the sides adjacent the missing side having wing extensions providing the means of attachment to a complementary surface; caps of similar multi-sided configuration sealing the extremities of the stanchion, the upper cap with a cutaway on one edge side conforming to the contours of the higher positioned rod opening; means of securing an end of each traverse rod at a rod opening in a stanchion side, supporting it and allowing the draw cord to be suspended within; and draw cord opening means providing for manipulating access to the draw cords.

2. A hollow stanchion according to claim 1 further characterized by provision for manipulating access to the draw cords consisting of pulley means mounted within the stanchion for maintaining the draw cords taut, two longitudinal slit draw cord openings in a stanchion wall, and a knob means mounted to each longitudinal slit draw cord opening attached through it to a draw cord.

3. A hollow stanchion according to claim 1 further characterized by the wing extensions having seam slits at the stanchion extremities, each cap with one edge side fitted into the seam slits of its respective stanchion extremity.

4. A hollow stanchion according to claim 1 further characterized by the wing extensions having seam slits at the stanchion extremities, each cap with one edge side fitted into the seam slits of its respective stanchion extremity, and by provision for manipulating access to the draw cords consisting of pulley means mounted within the stanchion for maintaining the respective draw cords taut, two longitudinal slit draw cord openings in a stanchion wall, and a knob means mounted to each longitudinal slit draw cord opening attached through it to a draw cord.

5. In an apparatus for stabilizing a pair of curtain traverse rods with draw cords in functioning horizontal positions one below the other: a hollow stanchion, attachable to a complementary surface, with means of securing an end of each traverse rod at a rod opening, thereby supporting it at that side and allowing the draw cord to be suspended within; an alignment opening permitting adjustments inside the stanchion; and provision for manipulating access to the draw cords consisting of pulley means mounted within the stanchion for maintaining the draw cords taut, two longitudinal slit draw cord openings in the stanchion wall, the stanchion material displaced in the formation of the said slit draw cord openings bent inward to shape at least one slit track for each, and knob means mounted to each longitudinal slit draw cord opening comprising an inner portion with a fastening device for firmly engaging a draw cord and a face oriented toward the slit track grooved to receive and slide on the slit track, a perpendicular projection from the same inner portion face emerging through the longitudinal slit draw cord opening stabilizing the arrangement when received and held by a knob.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 355,046 12/1886 Auld -167 2,639,766 5/1953 Pratt 160-40 2,736,373 2/1956 Truesdale 160-124 3,022,819 2/ 1962 Lampret 160-345 3,145,765 8/1964 Spongberg et al. 160-330 X 3,318,360 5/1957 Persson 160-107 DAVID J. WILLIAMOWSKY, Primary Examiner P. C. KANNAN, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 160-123

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5125447 *Feb 4, 1991Jun 30, 1992Timothy SuggsSafety device for window decoration cords
US5465779 *Jul 22, 1994Nov 14, 1995Rozon; DavidIntegrated cord loop drive means and housing for window covering
US5595232 *May 25, 1995Jan 21, 1997Benthin AktiengesellschaftDevice for manually operating a blind, preferably a vertical blind
US5797441 *Mar 26, 1997Aug 25, 1998Benthin AktiengesellschaftDevice for manually operating a blind
US6328090 *Oct 13, 2000Dec 11, 2001Hunter Douglas Inc.Framed covering for architectural opening
US6761203Mar 31, 2003Jul 13, 2004Tai-Long HuangBalanced window blind having a spring motor for concealed pull cords thereof
US6782937 *Oct 3, 2001Aug 31, 2004Hunter Douglas Inc.Framed covering for architectural opening
US6957680Oct 16, 2002Oct 25, 2005Hunter Douglas Inc.Framed covering for architectural opening
US20040221966 *Jun 17, 2004Nov 11, 2004Hunter Douglas Inc.Framed covering for architectural opening
WO2001058327A1 *Oct 13, 2000Aug 16, 2001Hunter Douglas Inc.Framed covering for architectural opening
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/344, 160/123
International ClassificationA47H5/032, A47H5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47H5/032
European ClassificationA47H5/032