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Publication numberUS3479244 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 18, 1969
Filing dateOct 19, 1965
Priority dateOct 19, 1965
Publication numberUS 3479244 A, US 3479244A, US-A-3479244, US3479244 A, US3479244A
InventorsBurnett Peter P A
Original AssigneeBurnett Peter P A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Linked fabric and method for making same
US 3479244 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 18, 1969 P. P. A. BURNETT 3,479,244

Fi l e d O c t l 9 l 9 65 BY I M, s 6M ATTORNEYS United States Patent M 3,479,244 LINKED FABRIC AND METHOD FOR MAKING SAME Peter P. A. Burnett, Mount Clemens, Mich. (5645 Forman Drive, Birmingham, Mich. 48010) Filed Oct. 19, 1965, Ser. No. 497,797 Int. Cl. D04h 3/05, 3/12 US. Cl. 16158 5 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A linked unwoven fabric and process for making the same which comprises a plurality of parallel strands crossed by a second set of strands and overlaid by a third set of strands parallel to the first strands wherein the first and third set of strands are arranged in pairs and joined at junction points between the second set of strands to form a plurality of relatively large loops which entrap the cross strands, thus forming a fabric material without weaving.

This invention relates to a linked fabric and more particularly to that type of fabric which is not woven but which is created by adhering certain strands together. With the advent of synthetic fibers which are of the extruded type made from numerous synthetic materials and plastics, it is known to create a fabric material Without Weaving by adhering crossing strands of Warp and woof filaments either by adhesive or by other means of creating adhesion.

It is an.object of the present invention to provide an improvement in fabrics of this nature to create a more comfortable feel and a looser construction than can be accomplished in previous fabrics.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a fabric of this improved type without increasing the cost of the fabric and to create a fabric which permits considerable flexibility in design due to the inherent nature of the construction.

It is a further object to provide a fabric which has a better stretch characteristic particularly when there is a bias force.

Briefly, the invention consists of a fabric which has pairs of strands running in parallel direction in general overlying each other with cross strands positioned between the double strands of each pair. The double strands are then adhered to each other between the cross strands so that the cross strands are trapped in spaced loops along the fabric in a direction transverse to the double strands.

Other objects and features of the invention relating to details of construction and operation will be apparent in the following description and claims.

Drawings accompany the disclosure and the various views thereof may be briefly described as:

FIGURE 1, a perspective view of a segment of a fabric showing the general construction.

FIGURE 2, a modification showing the manner in which the cross strands may be anchored to create a different design and effect.

Referring to the drawings, the fabric shown in FIGURE 1 may be formed of a number of different types of yarns or filaments either of the monofilament or multifilament or staple fiber type in the form of extruded filaments or spun yarn. The invention is particularly adapted to that type of filament which is responsive to heat sealing or sealing by adhesive but most any type of filament or yarn which can be adhered to itself can be utilized.

In general, the fabric consists of a plurality of pairs of strands 20 and 22 which are arranged in parallel relation spaced from each other in any desired spacing. The

3,479,244 Patented Nov. 18, 1969 bottom strands 20 can be disposed in parallel spaced relation and then overlayed by transverse strands 30 also spaced from each other at any desired distance. Then the top strands 22 can be disposed to overlie the bottom strands 20 in parallel relationship and in generally the same plane. The double strands are then adhered at the points A, B, C and D and so forth to form junctions at those points and to leave relatively large loops 32 in which the cross strands 30 are locked. Thus, without the necessity for the usual weaving shuttle arrangement, the fabric is created.

It is possible that in utilizing filament strands which are flexibly extruded that they may be adhered together prior to complete setting without the use of any additional heat or adhesive material. It is also possible to use heat sealing, dielectric sealing, ultrasonic means for adhesion which is known today in connection with plastic materials.

Adhesives of various kinds could also be used at the juncture points including elastomeric or foamed adhesives. It is, of course, possible to vary the feel and characteristics of the yarn by altering the diameters of the double strands and the cross strands to create any number of different combinations as is characteristic in the manufacture of fabric generally. The loose relationship between the cross strands 30 lying in the loops of the double strands gives the fabric a generally flexible and loose feel which is possible in connection with fabrics which are created by positive bending of the strands as they cross each other.

In FIGURE 2, a modified structure is shown to illustrate the versatility of the construction. In this case, the double strands 40, 42 are joined as previously indicated at points A, B, C, D and so forth to create loops 50, 52 and 54. The cross strands 60, 62, 64, however, are angled relative to the double strands so that strand 60, for example, passes through loop 52 of the first double strand and loop 50 of the second one. Similarly, strand 62 passes through loop 54 of the first double strand and loop 52 of the second and loop 50 of the third and so on. This creates a different appearing fabric and can be utilized to create fabric designs in connection with a herring bone design and the like. Otherwise, the construction of the fabric shown in FIGURE 2 is the same as in connection with FIGURE 1.

I claim:

1. A linked fabric for use as clothing or the like comprising one set of a plurality of pairs of first and second filamentary strands generally parallel with each other and separated from each other by predetermined spacing in a. direction transverse to said pairs, the first and second strands of each said pair adhering to each other only at points spaced lengthwise thereof and forming a loop between each adjacent pair of adherence points, and a plurality of filamentary cross strands generally parallel with each other and separated from each other in the lengthwise direction of said pairs, said cross strands running transversely of said pairs and through said loop thereof with each said cross strand being loosely trapped by a series of said loops spaced from each other lengthwise of that cross strand, all of said first strands lying on one side of said cross strands, and all of said second strands lying on the other side of said cross strands.

2. A linked unwoven fabric for use as clothing and the like comprising:

(a) a first set of flexible filamentary strands generally parallel with each other and spaced from each other a predetermined distance,

(b) a group of second flexible filamentary strands overlying said first strands at an angle thereto, all of said second strands being on one side of said first strands, and

(c) a plurality of third flexible filamentary strands each individually and respectively overlying and parallel to one of said first strands, all overlying said second strands and disposed on the said one side of said first strands, said first and third strands being joined together only in the spaces between said second strands and remaining free of said second strands so that each second strand is loosely entrapped at spaced intervals along its length in loops formed by the junctions between said first and third strands,

the first and third sets of overlying parallel strands being the only such strands in the fabric.

3. A linked unwoven fabric for use as clothing and the like comprising:

(a) a first set of flexible filamentary strands generally parallel with each other and spaced from each other a predetermined distance,

(b) a group of second flexible filamentary strands overlying said first strands at an angle thereto, said second strands being in spaced relation to each other and in general parallel disposition, all of said second strands being on one side of said first strands, and

(c) a plurality of third flexible filamentary strands each individually and respectively overlying and parallel to one of said first strands, all overlying said second strands and disposed on the said one side of said first strands, said first and third strands being joined together in the spaces between said second strands so that each second strand is loosely entrapped at spaced intervals along its length in loops formed by the junctions between said first and third strands.

the first and third sets of overlying parallel strands being the only such strands in the fabric.

4. A linked unwoven fabric for use as clothing or the like comprising:

(a) a first set of flexible filamentary strands generally parallel with each other and spaced from each other a predetermined distance,

(b) a group of second flexible filamentary strands overlying said first strands at an angle thereto, all of said second strands being on one side of said first strands, and

(c) a plurality of third flexible filamentary strands each individually and respectively overlying and parallel to one of said first strands, all overlying said second strands and disposed on the said one side of said first strands, said first and third strands being joined together only in the spaces between said second strands and remaining free of said second strands so that each second strand is loosely entrapped at spaced intervals along its length in loops formed by the junctions between said first and third strands.

the longitudinal extent of the junction of the first and third strands being substantially less than the spacing between the second strands to leave relatively large loops around the second strands.

the first and third sets of overlying parallel strands being the only such strands in the fabric.

5. The process of making a linked fabric for use as clothing or the like without weaving which comprises:

(a) disposing a plurality of first flexible strands in parallel spaced relation,

(b) disposing a plurality of second flexible strands crosswise of said first strands in spaced parallel relation wherein all of said second strands are on one side of said first strands.

(c) disposing a plurality of spaced third flexible strands each respectively in individual parallel overlying relation to said first strands and all overlying said second strands and on the said one side of said first strands, and

(d) joining said overlying third strands to said first strands between said second strands wherein each of said second strands is loosely entrapped in loops formed by said joining.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,333,618 11/1943 Strauss. 2,402,709 6/1946 Swasey 16147 X 2,537,323 1/ 1951 Wurzburger l6l--57 2,679,677 6/ 1954 Crandall 16190 3,239,401 3/1966 Beery 16158 X FOREIGN PATENTS 98,395 7/ 1961 Norway. 870,798 6/1961 Great Britain.

ROBERT F. BURNETT, Primary Examiner W. W. SCHWARZE, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2333618 *Aug 7, 1941Nov 2, 1943Arvey CorpPlastic screen material and method of making the same
US2402709 *Aug 27, 1943Jun 25, 1946Electric Boat CoCamouflage net
US2537323 *Dec 4, 1947Jan 9, 1951Paul D WurzburgerUnwoven fabric
US2679677 *Oct 30, 1951Jun 1, 1954Gen ElectricWoven glass electrical insulating sheet
US3239401 *Dec 18, 1964Mar 8, 1966Beery Virgil RMethod of bonding electric heating wire between layers of thermoplastic mesh
GB870798A * Title not available
NO98395A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3531363 *Jan 6, 1967Sep 29, 1970Du PontNonwoven fabric
US3960626 *Apr 9, 1973Jun 1, 1976Martin Marietta CorporationMethod of making high performance ablative tape
US4064306 *Jan 24, 1977Dec 20, 1977Bay Mills LimitedSubstantially closed fabric made by compressive redistribution of the filaments of at least some yarns of an open mesh fabric
US4440709 *Apr 26, 1982Apr 3, 1984Rasmussen O BMethod of manufacturing reticular sheet
US4504539 *Apr 15, 1983Mar 12, 1985Burlington Industries, Inc.Warp yarn reinforced ultrasonic web bonding
US5255998 *Nov 6, 1992Oct 26, 1993Rdb Plastotecnica S.P.A.Multiple-layer net structure for fluid drainage, particularly for geotechnical use
US5593766 *Jun 6, 1995Jan 14, 1997Bay Mills LimitedComposite for reinforcing bituminous roofing membranes including a lightweight grid of over-under construction
US6559077 *Jul 21, 1999May 6, 2003Polytech Netting, L.P.Heat shrink synthetic mesh structure
US6983970Nov 12, 2002Jan 10, 2006Exco Automotive Solutions, L.P.Frameless load restraining vehicular barrier device
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/112, 428/131, 156/306.3, 428/198, 428/114, 156/181, 428/110, 428/109, 442/366
International ClassificationD04H3/02
Cooperative ClassificationD04H3/02
European ClassificationD04H3/02