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Publication numberUS3479474 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 18, 1969
Filing dateJul 30, 1968
Priority dateJul 30, 1968
Also published asDE1930083A1
Publication numberUS 3479474 A, US 3479474A, US-A-3479474, US3479474 A, US3479474A
InventorsPajak Witold
Original AssigneeRemco Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy force-balanced push-rod toggle switch mechanism
US 3479474 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 18, 1969 w. PAJAK 3,479,474

TOY FORCE-BALANCED PUSH-ROD TOGGLE SWITCH MECHANISM l Filed July so. 1968 INVENTOR. A//Toc ,DAJ/4K mi wue lm United States Patent O 3,479,474 TOY FORCE-BALANCED PUSH-ROD TOGGLE SWITCH MECHANISM Witold Pajak, Lyndhurst, NJ., assignor to Remco Industries, Inc., Harrison, NJ.

Filed July 30, 1968, Ser. No. 748,758

Int. Cl. H01h 3/16 U.S. Cl. 200-61.44 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In operating toys, such as mobile toys, different means may be employed. That is, the toy may be operated or moved by mechanical or electrical means. For example, a mechanical means could could be a wind-up spring to move or operate a toy. Conversely, an electrical means could be a motor having power supplied to it by a battery cell installed in the toy. In most of these toys, the control or drive means moves the toy in one direction or in a particular manner, i.e., a series of similar movements or motions.

In contrast to these toys which move in one direction, there are mobile toys which can move in alternate and opposite directions. It is in this type of toy, which may be operated by a electrically powered motor, that the present toggle switch mechanism may be used.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a switch mechanism for controlling the direction of movement of an eleccally powered mobile toy. The switch mechanism is actuated by a push rod arranged to slide back and forth in between a pair of arms connected to its center by springs. The arms are mounted so that they can pivot from one alternate position to another. One arm is connected to the power source of the toys motor and has metal contacts arranged to make contact, or an electrical connection, with metal bars connected to the toys motor. When the rod is pushed in one direction, the metal contacts make contact respectively with the metal bars t0 direct a current ow through the motor to rotate it in one direction, thus, moving the toy in a corresponding direction. Conversely, by pushing the rod in the opposite direction, the metal contacts interchange their respective contacts with the metal bars and the motor reverses its rotation, thus moving the toy in an opposite direction.

It is an advantage of the present switch mechanism that the push-rod has a balanced force on it, i.e. equal and opposing forces by thesprings -connected to its center. By having a balancedlzforce'on it, the rod is moved easily with a light force on either end, whereby the switch operates smoothly and the toy reverses its movement easily. Also, because of the arrangement of its component parts, the switch mechanism does not tend to wear and can better withstand the misuse and abuse given toys.

The various aspects, features and advantages of the present toggle switch mechanism will be more understood by the following description in conjunction with Fice the drawings illustrating the preferred embodiment of the present invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE'DRAWINGS In the drawings:

FIG. l shows a mobile toy having incorporated therein a toggle switch mechanism embodying 'the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan View of a toy toggle switch mechanism embodying the present invention; the push-rod is shown pushed fully in one direction and the toggle arms are pivoted to one of their alternate positions;

FIG. 3 is an elevational partial view of the toy toggle switch mechanism shown in FIG. 2 taken along line 3 3; and

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a toy toggle switch similar to that shown in FIG. 2, where the push rod is pushed fully in the opposite direction and the toggle arms are pivoted to the other of their alternate positions.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In FIG. l, a mo-bile toy is shown which has incorporated therein a toggle switch mechanism embodying the present invention. As can be seen, a bumper member 12 of a push rod 14 (FIGS. 2 and 4) is extended in front of the toy 10, while a second bumper member 16 is extended in back of the toy.

Referring to FIGS. 2 and 4, the toggle switch in its general construction comprises a base or supporting frame 20 on which the push-rod 14 is slidably mounted in a pair of sliding bearings 22. At each end of the push-rod 14 are secured washers 26 and 27, in which the bumpers 12 and 16 are respectively mounted. The bumpers 12, 16 extend through respective openings 28 and 30 in the housing 32 of the toy 10.

A pair of toggle arms 34 and 36 are pivotally mounted by pivots 35 and 37, respectively, on opposite sides of the push rod 14. The toggle arms 34, 36 are respectively connected to the center of the push rod 14 by force means, such as springs 38 and 40. The springs 38, 40 extend from the ends of the toggle arms opposite to those pivoted to the base 20, to a sleeve 42 secured around the rod 14. The springs 38, 40 are respectively connected to the toggle arms 34, 36 by pins 44 and 46, and to the sleeve 42 by pins 48 and 50, respectively.

On the larger toggle arm 34, there are two extensions or strips 52 and 54, one mounted on each side thereof. At the respective outer ends of each of these strips 52, 54 contacts 56 and 58 are positioned. Just beneath the larger toggle arm 34, and in relation to the contacts 56, 58 are two metal contact bars 60 and 62 mounted on the base 20. The contact bars 60, 62 are mounted parallel to each other and the push-rod 14, and are spaced apart with the pivot 35 of the toggle arm 34, in between them.

Electrical wires or leads 64 and 66 are respectively extended from the metal strips 52, 54, on the larger toggle arm 34. One lead 64, is connected to a battery (not shown), and the other lead 66 is connected to an on-of switch (not shown). At one end of each of the contact bars 60, 62, respectively, are leads 68 and 704 which extend therefrom to the armature of a motor (not shown).

As can be best seen in FIGS. 2-4, the supporting frame 20 of the toggle switch mechanism may be horizontally mounted within a toy by support arms 72, 74, 76, and 78. Also, as shown, the push-rod 14 may be mounted in a plane parallel to the surface of the frame 20.

In use, when the bumper 12, for instance, presses against an object, such as a wall the push-rod 14 is pushed in the opposite direction (FIG. 2). The center of the rod, at pins 48 and 50, is moved past the pivots 35,

37 of the respective toggle arms. When this occurs, the springs 38, 40 go into tension and apply an equal force perpendicularly to each side of the rod 14 and hold the respective toggle arms 34, 36 in position. With this arrangement, the push-rod 14 can longitudinally move along its axis in both directions with little or no force on it.

When the metal contact 56 is in contact with the bar 60 and the metal Contact 58 in contact with bar 62 as shown in FIG. 2, the current ow through the motor is in a direction corresponding to that in which the toy is moving. Accordingly, when the rod 14 is pushed in the opposite direction by the bumper 16 pressing against a wall 82 (FIG. 4), the metal contacts 56 and 58 interchange their respective contacts with bars 60 and 62. By interchanging the respective contacts of the metal contacts 56, 58, with the bars 60, 62, the direction of the current ow through the motor is reversed, thus causing the movement of the toy in an opposite direction, i.e. away from the wall 82.

The electrical circuit in which the present toggle switch mechanism may be incorporated can be very simple. The circuit need only include a battery having leads extending to the armature of the motor of the toy. In between the battery and armature there may be an on-off switch placed in one of the leads in order to close and open the circuit as required to actuate and stop the motor.

The motor according to the present invention is preferably a reversible motor having a permanent magnet eld. A reversible motor of this type would perform most effectively in a mobile toy such as that described above, i.e., a toy designed to move in alternate and opposite directions.

An important feature of the present toggle switch mechanism is the arrangement of the pair of toggle arms to apply equal and opposing forces on the switch actuating push-rod. With this arrangement, the push-rod is held in constant alignment with its longitudinal axis and axis of movement, and slides evenly and easily.

From the foregoing it will be understood that the present toggle switch mechanism is suited to provide the advantages set forth above. Also, it is to be understood that the terms and description set forth above are only for purposes of illustration and are not intended to limit the scope of the present invention as described above and defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a mobile toy operated by an electrically powered motor, a force-balanced push-rod toggle switch mechanism for controlling the movement of the mobile toy, said toggle switch mechanism comprising:

(a) a supporting frame mounted within said mobile toy;

(b) a push-rod slidably mounted on said supporting frame, said push-rod being arranged to move along its longitudinal axis;

(c) a pair of toggle arms pivotally mounted on said supporting frame, said arms being arranged with one on each side of said push-rod and each arm being connected to said push-rod at its center by force means to apply equal and opposing forces thereto so the push-rod will slide easily;

(d) movable contacts positioned on one of said arms which has leads extending therefrom to the source of electrical power for said motor; and

(e) bars positioned in relation to said movable contacts, each of said bars being arranged to make contact with one metal contact at a time and each bar being connected by a lead to the armature of said motor so when said push-rod is moved in an opposite direction the arms pivot to alternate positions and the metal contacts interchange their respective contacts with said bars, thereby reversing the direction of current through the motor to reverse its rotation, and thus, reversing the direction of movement of the mobile toy.

2. A toggle switch mechanism as set forth in claim 1, wherein said force means are springs extending from said toggle arms to the center of said push-rod.

3. A toggle switch mechanism as set forth in claim 1, wherein said push-rod is arranged to move parallel to the surface of said supporting frame.

4. A toggle switch mechanism as set forth in claim 1, wherein said bars are mounted on said supporting frame beneath one of said toggle arms.

5. A toggle switch mechanism as set forth in claim 1, wherein said bars are mounted parallel to each other and the push-rod.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,921,408 1/l960 Leblic 46-244 ROBERT K. SCHAEFER, Primary Examiner M. GINSBURG, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. XR.

46-244; ZOO-67, 76

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2921408 *Aug 8, 1957Jan 19, 1960Librarie Hachette SaToy automobile controllable from a distance
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4591347 *Dec 12, 1984May 27, 1986Adolph E. GoldfarbWheeled miniature toy vehicle with control element that is squeeze-operated at sides
US4911669 *May 8, 1989Mar 27, 1990The Quaker Oats CompanyToy simulated exploding vehicle
US6492606Aug 21, 2001Dec 10, 2002Electroswitch CorporationSnap action switch
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/61.44, 446/353, 200/465, 446/442, 446/289
International ClassificationA63H17/40, A63H17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H17/40
European ClassificationA63H17/40