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Publication numberUS3481291 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 2, 1969
Filing dateJun 21, 1968
Priority dateJul 3, 1967
Also published asDE1685138A1, DE1685138B2, DE1685138C3
Publication numberUS 3481291 A, US 3481291A, US-A-3481291, US3481291 A, US3481291A
InventorsSchilling Jurgen
Original AssigneeSchilling Jurgen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for temporarily interrupting stitch formation in automatically controlled embroidering machines
US 3481291 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 2, 1969 J. SCHILLING 3,481,291

DEVICE FOR TEMPORARILY INTERRUPTING STITCH FORMATION IN AUTOMATICALLY CONTROLLED EMBROIDERING MACHINES Filed June 21, 1968 //VVf/V7'0/?: JURGEN SCH/Z Ll/VG TTOR/VEYS United States Patent Olfice 3,481,291 Patented Dec. 2, 1969 Int. Cl. Db 3/02, 69/02; D056 3/023 US. Cl. 112-98 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The invention provides a device for temporarily interrupting stitch formation in automatically controlled embroidering machines in which a rotating looper enters the thread loop formed by a needle fitted to the end of a recriprocating needle bar. The needle bar is rotatable through substantially a right angle in a dog imparting reciprocating motion to said needle bar which is slidable in an actuator ring for rotating said needle bar. This actuator ring is turnable by the plunger of a solenoid against the resistance of a spring which restores said actuator ring and said needle bar into their normal positions.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The interruption of stitch formation in automatically controlled embroidering machines is desirable more particularly in multiple head machines when the frames are automatically moved from one part of the pattern to another, since this eliminates the undesirable creation of intermediate floating stitches underneath. These floating stitches must be pulled out by hand when the embroidery has been completed, work which takes some time to do.

Several methods have alreary been proposed for intermediately stopping the formation of stitches, for instance by preventing the descent of the needle bar and the needle from piercing the Work. It has also been proposed to incorporate clutch means which retard the motion of the looper or to provide clutch means for rendering the needle bar inoperative altogether. In all these machines and mechanisms the arrangements are fairly complex and require considerable power for their operation. Furthermore, reactivation submits the parts to shock loads which cause premature wear.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is the obejct of the present invention to overcome this drawback and to provide a device which is also capable of being subsequently fitted to an existing embroidering machine.

To attain this object the present invention provides a device for temporarily interrupting stitch formation in automatically controlled embroidering machines having a rotary looper which enters the thread loop formed by a needle fitted to the free end of a reciprocating needle bar, said device comprising a needle bar, a needle fitted to one end of said needle bar, a dog engaging said needle bar and imparting reciprocating motion thereto, an actuator ring for guiding said needle bar and rotating it about its axis through an angle of about 90, a solenoid for rotating the actuator ring, and a tension spring for restoring said actuator ring and said needle bar into their normal positions.

Rotation of the needle bar carrying the needle prevents the looper from entering the thread loop and from forming a stitch.

Very little power is needed for thus turning the needle bar and the needle.

For returning the needle to its working position the actuator ring is connected to a torsion or tension spring. Substantially no wear is caused by the rotation of the needle through Rotation can be imparted to the actuator ring by energizing the solenoids by means of the Jacquard card which controls the machine.

Thick gauge needles are formed with a transverse groove across the needle eye. The looper moves through this groove when it enters the thread loop. Rotation of such a needle would cause the needle to move into the range of the looper. This can be avoided by inserting the needle eccentrically into the needle bar in such a way that rotation of the needle bar will carry the needle out of range of the looper.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING An embodiment of the invention will now be described by way of example and with reference to the accompanying schematic drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view of a needle bar;

FIG. 2 is a section taken on the line II--II of FIG. 1 but with the needle bar in raised position;

FIG. 3 is a top plan View of the needle bar;

FIG. 4 is a side view, of an enlarged scale, of a looper and a thicker needle formed with a transverse groove;

FIG. 5 shows the eccentric location of the needle in the needle bar in stitch forming position, and

FIG. 6 shows the eccentrically fitted needle in nonstitch-forming position.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT FIGS. 1 and 2 show a needle 1 and a looper 2 of an embroidering machine the movements of which are synchronized to enable the point 3 of the looper 2 to enter the loop of the upper thread formed by the needle 1. The looper 2 rotates in the arrowed direction 4. The needle 1 is attached to a needle bar -5 which reciprocates vertically, a movement which is imparted thereto by a dog 6 at the end of an arm 9 which derives reciprocatory motion in the direction of the double-headed arrow 10 from the main shaft of the embroidering machine.

For the purpose of stopping stitch formation the needle bar 5 and the needle 1 are rotatable about their axis through approximately a right angle. This rotation moves the thread loop of the needle 1 out of range of the looper 2 so that no stitch can be formed.

To achieve this end, the dog 6 is provided with a slot 11 engaged by a pin 12 fitted into the needle bar 5. The needle bar 5 can rotate in the dog 6 whilst continuing to be entrained thereby for up and down movement.

Moreover, an actuator ring 13 is loosely mounted on the needle bar 5. This actuator ring 13 contains a pin 15 engaging in a slot 14 in the needle bar 5. The actuator ring 13 is operable by the plunger of a solenoid 16 adapted to rotate the actuator ring 13 through an angle of about 90 by one or more interposed links 17. A tension spring 18 is adapted to turn back the actuator ring 13 into its normal position.

As will be understood from FIG. 3 a pin 19 connects the links 17 to the actuator ring 13 and is thus movable from position a into position b. The pin 15 engaging the slot 14 thus permits the needle bar 5 to be rotated and to be moved to and fro into practically any desired position. The solenoid 16 is preferably energized by pulses triggered by the Jacquard card controlling the embroidering machine.

Thicker needles 11:, particularly for edge embroidery, are formed with a transverse indentation 20 as shown in FIGS. 4, 5 and 6. If the needle bar 5 fitted with such a thicker needle 1a were turned through an angle of 3 roughly 90 the point 3 of the looper 2 which moves on the line 7 in FIGS. 5 and 6, would foul the solid part of the stern of the needle 1a. Consequently this needle 1a is eccentrically fitted to the needle bar 5. FIG. 5 shows the working position and FIG. 6 the nonstitch forming position after the needle bar 5 has been turned through roughly a right angle in the direction of arrow 8.

The invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof. The present embodiment is therefore to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, the scope of the invention being indicated by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description.

What is claimed is:

1. A device for temporarily interrupting stitch formation in automatically controlled embroidering machines having a rotary looper which enters the thread loop formed by a needle fitted to the free end of a reciprocating needle bar, said device comprising:

(a) a needle bar;

(b) a needle fitted to one end of said needle bar;

(0) a driven dog engaging said needle bar and imparting reciprocating motion thereto;

(d) an actuator ring, means guiding said needle bar for axial movement in said actuator ring, connecting means between said actuator ring and said needle bar for preventing relative rotary movement;

(e) a solenoid, means mechanically connecting said solenoid to said actuator ring for rotating said actuator ring and said needle bar through an angle of about 90 degrees from their normal positions; and

(f) a tension spring connected to said actuator ring and biasing said actuator ring and said needle bar into their normal positions.

2. A device according to claim 1, wherein Jacquard card means control the operation of said machine and means connecting said solenoid to said Jacquard card means whereby said solenoid is energized by pulses trig gered by said Jacquard card means.

3. A device according to claim 1, wherein means mount said needle in the lower end of said needle bar in an eccentric position to the axis of said needle bar, a transverse indentation across the shank of said needle whereby the looper will clear the needle shank when said needle bar and needle are rotated from their normal positions.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 593,733 11/1897 Colley 11298 X 1,474,269 11/1923 Lautenschlager 112221 2,018,456 10/1935 Jonas 112--98 X 2,889,792 6/1959 Scheibel 112-98 386,837 7/1888 Litchfield.

FOREIGN PATENTS 1,100,203 1/1968 Great Britain.

ALFRED R. GUEST, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 112-22, 158

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US386837 *Sep 28, 1885Jul 31, 1888F Onelitchfield
US593733 *Jun 10, 1896Nov 16, 1897The WeeksMachine
US1474269 *Jul 26, 1919Nov 13, 1923Lautenschlager William FSewing machine
US2018456 *Mar 10, 1932Oct 22, 1935Jonas HansEmbroidering or like machine
US2889792 *Jan 19, 1955Jun 9, 1959Spezialnahmaschinenwerk LimbacMulti-needle embroidery machine
GB1100203A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4195583 *Apr 24, 1978Apr 1, 1980The Singer CompanyReleasing mechanism for cam followers in a zigzag sewing machine
US4241677 *Jun 25, 1979Dec 30, 1980Velva AgTwo needle sewing machine
US4473018 *Sep 16, 1983Sep 25, 1984Aisin Seiki Kabushiki KaishaNeedle bar selection device for a multiple needle sewing machine
US4608937 *Mar 11, 1985Sep 2, 1986Janome Sewing Machine Co., Ltd.Device for stabilizing stitches in a sewing machine
US5664511 *Mar 13, 1996Sep 9, 1997Tokai Industrial Sewing Machine Co., Ltd.Thread cutter and drive unit for a chain stitch sewing machine
CN1049940C *Mar 14, 1996Mar 1, 2000东海工业缝纫机株式会社Yarn cut-off device for chain stitch sewing machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/98, 112/467, 112/221
International ClassificationD05B81/00
Cooperative ClassificationD05B81/00
European ClassificationD05B81/00