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Publication numberUS3481462 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 2, 1969
Filing dateJan 10, 1969
Priority dateJan 10, 1969
Publication numberUS 3481462 A, US 3481462A, US-A-3481462, US3481462 A, US3481462A
InventorsAnnette M Chapel
Original AssigneeWindsor Nuclear Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disposable surgical holder and counter
US 3481462 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 2, 1969 A. M. CHAPEL 3,481,462

DISPOSABLE SURGICAL HOLDER AND COUNTER Filed Jan. 10, 1969 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR ANNETTE M. CHAPEL BY 00% W I a ATTORNEYS Dec. 2, 1969 A. M. CHAPEL 3,481,462

DISPOSABLE SURGICAL HOLDER AND COUNTER Filed Jan. 10, 1969 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIGS a a r r J as I 68 64 II T r F s j /3:4 ;\5 1 T1370 4 44 (SE1 '6? \C 3 48 [I 1 32 fi l-7 INVENTOR.

ATTORNEYS ANNETTE M. CHAPEL United States Patent 3,481,462 DISPOSABLE SURGICAL HOLDER AND COUNTER Annette M. Chapel, St. Ignace, Mich., assignor to Windsor Nuclear, Inc., South Windsor, Conn., a corporation of Connecticut Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 717,630,

Apr. 1, 1968. This application Jan. 10, 1969, Ser. No. 795,400

Int. Cl. A61b 19/02; B65d 1/34; A61f 13/00 US. Cl. 20663.2 18 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A disposable surgical holder and counter or package having a base made from an open cell polyethylene foam material. The base is elongated and has a transverse rectangular cross section throughout the longitudinal extent thereof. A plurality of longitudinally spaced apart openings are provided in the base between the upper and lower surfaces thereof for receiving and firmly holding surgical elements such as dissector sponges, cottonoids, and various other operating room products or surgical elements. An adhesive material is applied to the lower surface of the base, with a removable tear strip or backing being superimposed over the adhesive material during the manufacture thereof to cover the adhesive material prior to use of the disposable surgical holder and counter in an operating room. In use the tear strip is removed from the base and the base is then adhesively secured to a hospital table or other support surface thereby rendering same immovable in the event the table is turned over or is bumped. The surgical elements in the base remain in place even if the table is turned over or is bumped due to the tight fit between the elements and the cavities or openings in the base. The surgical elements may be selec tively removed from the base during the performance of a surgical operation and then replaced in the base after use whereby the doctor or nurse may make an exact visual accounting of the surgical elements to determine at a glance and to thereby insure that all of such elements have been removed from the patients body. After use the entire surgical holder and counter (including the surgical elements) is discarded.

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION This application is 'a continuation-in-part of my copending application, Ser. No. 717,630, entitled Disposable Surgical Holder and Counter, filed Apr. .1, 1968.

In another embodiment of the invention the disposable surgical holder and counter includes a base made, as an example, from an open cell polyurethane foam material, said base having a plurality of openings arranged in two rows between the upper and lower surfaces thereof for receiving and firmly holding surgical elements such as sponges, etc. Surgical elements are received in the openings, with portions of each element extending upwardly from the top surface of the base. A plastic cover is provided having in the top surface thereof two rows of recesses, the number of arrangement of the recesses corresponding to the number of arrangement of the openings in the base. Each recess receives the upstanding exposed portion of the sponge or other surgical element held firmly in the base. The cover, which may be made from a lightweight plastic material, extends completely over' the top and sides of the base and the surgical elements therein. A removable tear strip, as an example, may be used to seal the base and cover together to provide ,a seal-tight package. In use, the plastic cover is removed from the base and is then inverted, with the top exterior surface Patented Dec. 2, 1969 of the cover being adhesively secured to a support. After the sponges or other surgical elements have been removed from the base and used they are placed in the recesses in the cover whereby the doctor or nurse may make an exact visual accounting of the surgical elements to determine at a glance and to thereby insure that all of such elements have been removed from the patients body. Thereafter the cover with the used surgical elements therein is discarded along with the base.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention The disposable surgical holder and counter is used by doctors and nurses in operating rooms and hospitals where it is required to account for all sponges, cottonoids "and other surgical products and items used during operations.

Description of the prior art SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The disposable surgical holder and counter is provided with .an elongated base made from an open cell polyethylene foam material. A plurality of holes or openings are provided in the upper surface of the base. Such openings are shaped so as to conform at least in part to the configuration of the surgical elements to be inserted and frictionally secured therein. In one embodiment an adhesive material is applied to the lower surface of the base and is provided with a tear strip which is removed prior to aflixing the base to a support in an operating room. In the other embodiment a cover is superimposed over the base and the surgical elements therein. The cover is removed from the base and is secured to a support in an operating room. The special merit or advantage of this invention resides in the fact that a visual count of the sponges, etc. can be made at a glance by the doctor or nurse in charge and thus eliminate any question of sponge countJIf the holes or openings in the base of the holder or in the case of another embodiment, in the cover of the holder are filled the doctor or nurse knows immediately that all clean and used sponges are properly accounted for.

Thus the present invention eliminates the guess work now adherent in accounting for sponges, gauzes and other surgical elements. The holder is economical to manufacture, eflicient in operation and results in substantial savings in the time required for the nurse to account for sponges when compared to present methods.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of the disposable surgical holder and counter;

FIGURE 2 is an end view of the surgical counter and bolder shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a plan view of the surgical counter and holder looking in the direction of arrows 3-3 in FIG- URE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of the surgical counter and holder, in an inverted position, with a portion of the backing removed to expose the adhesive surface on the base thereof;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken on the line 55 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the present invention, with a portion of the cover broken away and in section to expose the interior thereof;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 77 of FIGURE 6;

FIGURE 8 is a sectional view of a modified disposable surgical holder and counter, with the cover removed, and taken along the line 88 of FIGURE 6;

FIGURE 9 is a sectional view through the cover mounted in use on a support and illustrating a disposable used sponge inserted into a recess in the cover.

DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The disposable surgical holder and counter is designated by the numeral 10 and comprises an elongated base 12 having a generally transverse rectangular crosssection throughout the longitudinal extent thereof. The base 12 is provided with a plurality of generally cylindrical openings 14 located on the longitudinal axis thereof between the upper and lower surfaces 16 and 18.

The base 12 is made from a lightweight, yieldable plastic material such as open cell cellular structures of polyethylene foam material. Polyethylene foam material is lightweight, yieldable or resilient and is easily cut and drilled to provide the required base configuration and openings.

The openings 14 are shaped to conform to and frictionally engage the outside surfaces of the surgical items 20. The openings 14 have axes which are perpendicular to and intersect the longitudinal axis of the base 12. As an example items 20 may be in form of dissector sponges, cottonoids, other types of sponges and various other operating room products and surgical elements. The surgical ,items are firmly held in the base 12 by the polyethylene foam material and can be easily removed therefrom due to the yieldability of the foam material. After use in the operating room, the items 20 are reinserted in the openings 14 in the base 12.

The lower surface 18 of the base 12 is provided with an adhesive material or tacky substance 22 of the ype commonly used for bumper stickers, name tags, etc. A removable tear strip or tacking element 24 is placed over the adhesive material 22. The openings 14 extend completely through the tear strip 24 as best illustrated in FIGURES 4 and 5.

The holder 10, as an example, is 1 wide, 3" long and /2" thick. The openings are approximately A" OD. The surgical items 20 are usually inserted in the base 12 after the strip 24 has been adhesively secured thereto in order to help to insure that items 20 will remain clean and sterile. The completed packag s 10 are stored in sterilized containers ready for use in an operating room or hospital.

The nurse initially peels back the strip 24 and then adhesively secures the base 12 of the counter 10 to the Mayo stand or to any convenient support surface in the operating room. Thus the counter 10 will remain in place ev n if the table turns over or is bumped. In addition the surgical items 20 remain in the base 12 even though the table is turned over or is bumped due to the tight or firm frictional contact between the items 20 and the base 12.

The nurse replaces the items 20 in the base 12 after use. Thus the present invention eliminates any question of sponge count. The nurse can make a visual count at a glance. If the holes or openings 18 are filled the nurse knows that all clean and used sponges or items 20 are accounted for. With the present invention the valuable time of an operating room nurse can be used for nursing functions rather than for keeping track of the sponge count. Hopital costs are lessened as the present invention eliminates put up time by the nurse. The pre-packaged 4 sterile counter 10 also eliminates the need to place such surgical items on safety pins and in test tubes for sterilization as is now required. Upon completion of the operation the operating room nurse makes a final check and then if all of the clean and used sponges are accounted for disposes of and discards the counter 10.

The counter 10 can be constructed in various sizes and configurations to hold any number of surgical items 20 regardless of their shape. It has been found that five items 20 to a counter is desirable.

The surgical holder and counter 10 may be constructed according to mass production techniques. As an example, a polyethylene foam sheet of 4' x 12' is placed upon a support surface. One side of the sheet is provided with an adhesive material or substance which is in turn covered by a removable backing sheet. Thereafter the assembled unit is cut into 12' strips having a width of 1". Thereafter a suitable template is utilized in conjunction with a drill press whereby the openings 20 are drilled through the base 12 and tear strip 24. Thereafter the 12 strip iscut to form a plurality of bases 12 of the proper length.

It should also be appreciated that materials other than polyethylene may be used with the present invention. In certain cases a rigid plastic material may be used for holding items other than the dissector sponges. Thus the counter of the present invention could be made of a rigid material of a size or configuration depending upon the particular items to be inserted therein.

The modified disposable surgical holder and counter is illustrated in FIGURES 6-9 inclusive and is designated bythe numeral 30. The disposable holder and counter 30 comprises a base 32 which, as an example, may be approx imately 4" square and 4" thick. The base 32 includes an upper surface 34, a lower surface 36 and side surfaces 37. Located in the upper surface 34 are a plurality of openings 38 which are arranged in two rows, each row having five openings 38. The base 32 is made from a lightweight, yieldable material such as open cell cellular structures of polyurethane foam material.

The openings 38 are elongated as illustrated in FIG- URE 6 and each opening 38 includes a curved inner surface 40. As an example, surgical elements 42 in the form of sponges or other operating room products are inserted in the openings 38, with the lower portions of the elements 42 occupying and filling the corresponding openings 38 asbest illustrated in FIGURE 8. The upper portions of the sponges or elements 42 extend upwardly from the top surface 34 as best illustrated in FIGURES 6 and 8. Thus the elements 42 are supported by the base 32 due to the tight fit and frictional engagement therebetween.

The holder and counter 30 includes a unitary plastic cover 44. T he cover 44 is constructed and arranged to fit over the sponges or elements 42 and to completely enclose the base 32 as best illustrated in FIGURE 6. The cover 44 includes four side walls 46, each wall 46 having an outwardly turned flange 48. Each side wall 46 includes a lower portion 50 and an upper portion 52. The cover 44 has a top wall or surface 54 which is provided with recesses 56 equal in number to the number of openings 38 and arranged in the same manner as the openings 38. Thus the top wall 54 is provided with two rows of recesses 56, the number and arrangement of the recesses 56 corresponding to the number and arrangement of the openings 38 in the base 32. x

Each recess 56 receives the upstanding exposed portion of the sponge or element 42 which is firmly held in the base 32 as explained previously. The cover 44, which may be made from a lightweight plastic material, extends completely over the top wall or surface 34 and the sides 37 of the base 32 and the surgical elements 42 therein as best illustrated in FIGURE 6. The recesses 56 are constructed, arranged and shaped to engage the outer surfaces of the upstanding portions of the sponges or elements 42.

A removable tear strip 60 extends completely across the bottom of the base 32 and cover 44 and is adhesively secured to the package at least at the flanges 48 to provide a seal-tight package. In certain cases a filler element 62 may be interposed between the base 32 and the tear strip 60. The filler element 62 may be adhesively secured to the base 32. In certain cases where the filler 62 is not used then the removable tear strip 60 may be adhesively secured to the lower surface 36 of the base 32 and to the flanges 48 provided on the cover 44.

In use, the plastic cover 44 is removed from the base 32 by initially breaking the seal therebetween. If the tear strip 60 is utilized it is removed from the package and the cover 44 is then separated from the base 32. The cover 44 is provided on the upper surface thereof with surfaces 64 and 66 to which is applied an adhesive material. The adhesive material on surfaces 64 and 66 is exposed and the cover is then inserted and affixed to the support 70 as best illustrated in FIGURE 9. The cover 44 as best shown in FIGURE 9 forms an open mouth receptacle. After the sponges or other surgical elements 42 have been utilized they are placed in the recesses 56 provided in the cover 54 rather than reinserting them in the openings 38 in the base 32. The reason for this is that the used sponges 42 contain excessive blood and it is desirable not to contaminate the unused sponges 42 in the base 32 with the used sponges. Thus the nurse places the used sponges in the corresponding cavities S6 in the cover 54. The doctor or nurse may make-an exact visual accounting of the surgical elements 42 to determine at a glance and to thereby insure that all of the elements 42 have been removed from the patients body. Thereafter the cover containing the used surgical elements 42 is discarded along with the base 32.

The two fiat surfaces 64 and the two flat surfaces 66 provided on the top surface of the cover 44 may be provided with removable tear strips 68 which are removed in order to expose the adhesive substance for securing the cover 44 to the support 70 as illustrated in FIGURE 9.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. A disposable surgical holder and counter comprising a base having a pair of surfaces, a plurality of openings in one of said surfaces for receiving a firmly holding surgical elements, and an adhesive material on the other of said surfaces for securing said base to a support whereby the surgical elements may be selectively removed from said base and then replaced in the openings in said base after use to provide an exact accounting of the surgical elements.

2. The holder and counter defined in claim 1 wherein said base is made from a yieldable material.

3. The holder and counter defined in claim 1 wherein said base is made froma plastic material.

4. The holder and counter defined in claim 1 wherein said base is made from an open cell porous plastic material.

5. The holder and counter defined in claim 4 wherein said plastic material is polyethylene foam.

6. The holder and counter defined in claim 1 wherein said adhesive surface is provided with a removable tear strip.

7. The holder and counter defined in claim 1 wherein said base is elongated, with said openings arranged on the longitudinal axis thereof, and the surfaces defining said openings are adapted to frictionally contact the surgical elements.

8. The holder and counter defined in claim 7 wherein said base is of rectangular cross-section throughout its longitudinal extent.

9. The holder and counter defined in claim 8 wherein said openings are of cylindrical configuration, with the axes thereof perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of said base.

10. A disposable surgical holder and counter comprising a base having a plurality of openings therein for receiving and firmly holding surgical elements, and a cover provided with a plurality of recesses and enclosing said base and surgical elements to form a seal-tight package, said cover after removal from said base being adapted to be secured to a support whereby the surgical elements may be selectively removed from said base and then placed in the recesses in said cover after use to provide an exact accounting of the surgical elements.

11. The holder and counter defined in claim 10 wherein said base is made from a yieldable material.

12. The holder and counter defined in claim 10 wherein said base is made from an open cell porous plastic material.

13. The holder and counter defined in claim 10 wherein said cover is made from a plastic material.

14. The holder and counter defined in claim 10 wherein said base is rectangular, with said openings arranged in a pair of rows and the surfaces defining said openings are adapted to frictionally contact the surgical elements.

15. The holder and counter defined in claim 10 wherein said base is of rectangular cross-section throughout its extent.

16. A disposable surgical holder and counter comprising a package having a plurality of cavities therein for receiving and firmly holding surgical elements, said package being adapted to be secured to a support where; by the surgical elements may be selectively removed and then replaced in the cavities after use to provide an accounting of the surgical elements.

17. The disposable surgical holder and counter of claim 16 wherein said package consists of a base in which the cavities are located, with the surgical elements being substantially enclosed by the surfaces defining said cavities.

18. The disposable surgical holder and counter of claim 16 wherein said package consists of a base and a cover, said cavities being defined by openings in said base and corresponding recesses in said cover, the surgical elements occupying said openings and recesses, said cover enclosing said base and the surgical elements to form a seal-tight structure, said cover after removal from said base being adapted to be secured to a support whereby the surgical elements may be selectively removed from said base and then placed in the recesses in said cover after .use to provide an accounting of the surgical elements.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,119,773 6 1938 Buckner 206-72 1,650,980 11/ 1927 Campbell 206-12. 2,659,163 11/ 1953 Albee. 2,740,405 4/ 1956 Riordan 128296 3,080,963 3/ 1963 Rothgart 206-42 3,285,409 11/ 1966 Loran 206-72 3,370,697 2/1968 Levey et al. 206-4534 FOREIGN PATENTS 326,905 1/ 1958 Switzerland. 705,943 3/1954 Great Britain.

WILLIAM T. DIXSON, JR., Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No 3,481 ,462 December 2 l969 Annette M. Chapel It is certified that error appears in the above identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 1 lines 62 and 63, "of", first occurrence each occurrence, should read and Column 2 line 28 "element' should read elements line 69 "in" should read of Column 3, line 10 "a" should read the line 15 "into" should read in line 45 "ype" should read type line 47, "tacking" should read backing line 74 "Hopital" should read Hospital Column 5 line 40 "a" should read and line 50 "froma" should read from a Signed and sealed this 3rd day of November 1970 (SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M. FLETCHER,JR. WILLIAM E. SCHUYLER, JR

Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3613899 *Jul 2, 1970Oct 19, 1971Robert D AutenApparatus facilitating the counting and disposal of surgical sponges
US3696920 *Oct 15, 1970Oct 10, 1972Int Paper CoDevice for organizing objects
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US3876067 *Aug 15, 1973Apr 8, 1975Helmut SchwarzCollection box for syringe needles
US3948390 *Oct 18, 1974Apr 6, 1976Ferreri John GLaparotomy sponge package and counter
US4105115 *Aug 19, 1976Aug 8, 1978Horvath Ralph SSuture and needle holder
US4120397 *Oct 4, 1977Oct 17, 1978Richard-Allan Medical Industries, Inc.Unit for accommodating disposable bladelike articles
US4157758 *Oct 25, 1977Jun 12, 1979Rudolph Beaver, Inc.Surgical blade package assembly
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US4260056 *Mar 26, 1979Apr 7, 1981Horvath Ralph SSuture and needle holder
US4312447 *Mar 4, 1980Jan 26, 1982Mcwilliams Rose MMethod and apparatus for enumerative display and disposal of surgical sponges
US4321999 *Dec 31, 1979Mar 30, 1982Higgins Sam MReusable surgical implements holder
US4372102 *Dec 11, 1980Feb 8, 1983Mcwilliams Rose MMethod and apparatus for enumerative display and disposal of surgical sponges
US4373629 *Jun 9, 1981Feb 15, 1983Akzona IncorporatedUsed surgical sharps container with re-usable magnetic base
US4494653 *Apr 18, 1984Jan 22, 1985Codman & ShurtleffContainer for surgical patties
US4784267 *Jul 20, 1987Nov 15, 1988Gessler Annette LSurgical sponge counter and disposal container
US4903837 *Aug 16, 1988Feb 27, 1990Kimberly-Clark CorporationApparatus for dispensing and accounting absorbent surgical articles
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US4989733 *May 21, 1990Feb 5, 1991Marc PatryReady-to-use medical trays
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US5172808 *May 17, 1989Dec 22, 1992John BrunoDevice for safely transporting one or more hypodermic needles or the like from point of use to point of ultimate disposal
US5313181 *Jan 7, 1993May 17, 1994Lisle CorporationMagnetic socket holder
US5316143 *Nov 12, 1992May 31, 1994Horn Billy LDevice for holding cylindrical socket heads
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US8279068Dec 13, 2011Oct 2, 2012Clearcount Medical Solutions, Inc.Automatic surgical sponge counter and blood loss determination system
US8576076Oct 1, 2012Nov 5, 2013Clearcount Medical Solutions, Inc.Automatic surgical sponge counter and blood loss determination system
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US20040256267 *Sep 5, 2002Dec 23, 2004Roger Gregory JamesSterile screw delivery system
US20070062835 *Aug 18, 2006Mar 22, 2007Clear Solutions LlcPatty manager and method
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/438, 206/461, 206/440, 206/564
International ClassificationA61B19/02, A61B19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61B19/029, A61B2019/4821
European ClassificationA61B19/02R8