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Publication numberUS3482738 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 9, 1969
Filing dateMar 15, 1966
Priority dateMar 15, 1966
Publication numberUS 3482738 A, US 3482738A, US-A-3482738, US3482738 A, US3482738A
InventorsBartels Herbert D
Original AssigneeContinental Can Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Aerosol container and valve therefor
US 3482738 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. D- BARTELS AEROSOL CONTAINER AND VALVE THEREFOR Dec. 9, 1969 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR HERBE RT D. BARTELS Filed March 15, 1966 ATTORNEYS Dec. 9', 1969 "H. D. BARTELS 33 AEROSOL CONTAINER AND VALVE THEREFOR- Filed March 15, 1966 Pm? 2 ShGGt-ShGt 2 HERBERT D. BARTELS W Z Wom United States Patent 3,482,738 AEROSOL CONTAINER AND VALVE THEREFOR Herbert D. Bartels, Chicago, Ill., assignor to Continental Can Company, Inc, New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Mar. 15, 1966, Ser. No. 534,452 Int. Cl. B65d 35/28, 35/14; B67d 3/00 US. Cl. 222-95 13 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention is directed to a novel dispensing container of the type including a propellant chamber and a product chamber, the product chamber being a baglike structure having a closed end portion, means for dispensing a dispensable product from the product chamber to atmosphere, and aperture means for introducing a propellant into the propellant chamber. Closure or valve means close the aperture means and are maintained in the closed position thereof by the closed end portion of the bag-like structure prior to the performance of a dispensing operation.

A further object of this invention is to provide a novel dispensing container of the type immediately above-described wherein means are provided for securing the closure means to the closed end portion of the bag-like structure and means are further provided for releasing the securing means whereby the closure means is released from the bag-like structure and retained in position relative to the aperture means by the force of a propellant within the propellant chamber.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a novel dispensing container of the type heretofore described in which the releasing means is defined by passage means between the closure means and the closed end portion of the bag-like structure.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel dispensing container of the type heretofore described in which the closure means is a relatively fiat disc-like valve element, and propellant within the propellant chamber defines the sole means for maintaining a disc-like valve element in overlying relationship to the aperture means.

With the above, and other objects in View that will hereinafter appear, the nature of the invention will be more clearly understood by reference to the, following detailed description, the appended claims and the several views illustrated in the accompanying drawings:

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is an exploded view partly in fragmentary side elevation and partly in longitudinal section of a dis pensing container, and illustrates a valve disc secured to a lower end portion of a collapsible product chamber and an associated aperture lower closure prior to the complete assembly of the dispensing container.

FIGURE 2 is a bottom end view taken generally along line 22 of FIGURE 1 and illustrates the valve disc and passages in an end wall of the collapsible product chamber.

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a lower end portion of the dispensing container of FIGURE 1 with parts broken away for clarity, and illustrates the valve disc sandwiched between the lower closure and a bottom wall of the product chambers.

FIGURE 4 is a side elevational view of a completely assembled dispensing container with parts broken away for clarity, and illustrates propellant being introduced into a propellant chamber by the unseating of the valve disc under the influence of the propellant.

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged fragmentary axial sectional 31,482,738 Patented Dec. 9, 1969 view through the dispensing container of FIGURE 4, and illustrates propellant migrating to an area between the valve disc and the bottom wall of the product chamber.

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged fragmentary axial sectional view through the dispensnig container of FIGURE 4, and illustrates the separation of the valve disc from the bottom wall of the product chamber at sometime during a dispensing operation.

FIGURE 7 is a highly schematic side elevational view with parts broken away for clarity of another dispensing container constructed in accordance with this invention, and illustrates another valve disc sandwiched between a lower closure of the container and a collapsible truncated product chamber.

FIGURE 8 is an enlarged bottom end view taken generally along line 88 of FIGURE 7, and illustrates parallel passages formed in a bottom wall of the product chamber for permitting propellant to break an adhesive bond between the valve disc and the product chamber during a dispensing operation.

FIGURE 9 is a highly schematic side elevational View of another dispensing container with parts broken away for clarity, and illustrates a collapsible product chamber of a generally inverted configuration as compared to the product chamber of the dispenser shown in FIGURE 7.

FIGURE 10 is a highly schematic side elevational view with parts broken away for clarity of another dispensing container, and illustrates a generally T-shaped extension of a collapsible product chamber maintaining a valve disc in overlying sealed relationship to an apertured lower closure.

FIGURE 11 is an enlarged bottom view taken generally along line 1 111 of FIGURE 10, and more clearly illustrates the relationship between the extension and the valve disc.

FIGURE 12 is a bottom perspective view of the T- shaped extension and a portion of the product chamber, and more clearly illustrates the configuration of the extension and the valve disc secured thereto.

FIGURE 13 is a fragmentary sectional view with parts broken away for clarity of a lower end portion of a dispensing container and illustrates a recessed lower closure locating a valve disc in overlying relationship to an aperture.

FIGURE 14 is a fragmentary sectional view with parts broken away for clarity of another dispensing container, and illustrates a recess formed in a bottom wall of a product chamber for locating a valve disc in overlying relationship to an aperture.

A novel dispensing container constructed in accordance with this invention is best illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 4 of the drawings, and is generally designated by the reference numeral 10. The dispensing container 10 includes a tubular, cylindrical, metallic body 11 closed at opposite ends by respective upper and lower closures 12, 13. The closure 12 is illustrated being secured to the container 11 by a conventional double seam 14 while the lower closure 13 is illustrated in FIGURE 1 prior to being secured to a flange 15 of the container body 11. The upper closure 12 is generally dome-shaped in configuration and includes a mouth 16 opening to the interior of a collapsible, beaded product chamber generally referred to by the numeral 17. The product chamber 17 is crimped or otherwise conventionally secured adjacent the open mouth 16. A dispensable product is thereafter introduced into the product chamber 17 through the mouth 16 after which a conventional manually operable dispensing mechanism, generally referred to by the reference numeral 18 (FIGURE 4) is secured to the upper closure 12. The dispensing mechanism 18 is preferably valve actuated and, upon depressing a plunger 20 thereof, the product (not shown) within the chamber 17 is dispensed in a conventional manner under the influence of a propellant (not shown) as will become more apparent hereafter.

The product chamber 17 is a bag-like structure which is preferably constructed from plastic or relatively ductile metallic material and includes a closed lower end portion 21 terminating in a thickened bottom wall 22. A lower surface 23 (FIGURE 2) of the bottom wall 22 is provided with a plurality of intersecting slots 24 which define passage means for a purpose to become more fully apparent hereafter.

Closure means 25 in the form of a generally circular disc-like element or valve disc is secured to the surface 23 of the product chamber bottom wall 22 by adhesive 26. The bond strength of the adhesive 26 is relatively weak but is sufficiently strong to maintain the disc-like element 25 secured to the bottom wall 22 in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 1 of the drawings prior to the attachment of the lower closure 13 to the container body 11.

As is best illustrated in FIGURE 1 of the drawings, it should be particularly noted that the valve disc 25 and the bottom wall 22 of the product chamber 17 are positioned closely adjacent a lowermost terminal edge 27 of the container body 11 prior to the securement of the lower closure 13 to the flange 15.

The lower closure 13 is preferably constructed from metallic material and includes a generally upwardly dome-shaped end panel 28 which is axially apertured at 30 and includes a peripheral edge portion 31.

The closure 13 is secured to the container body 11 by moving the closure 13 axially upwardly from the posi tion in FIGURE 1 of the drawings to a position at which the flange 15 is received in the conventionally contoured peripheral edge portion 31 of the closure 13. During this upward movement of the closure 13, the central portion of the end panel 28 engages the lower surface (unnumbered) of the valve disc 25 and urges the valve disc 25 and the closed lower end portion 21 of the product chamber 17 upwardly to the position illustrated in FIGURE 3 of the drawings. At this time conventional end seaming apparatus forms the portions 15, 31 into a conventional double seam 32 to unite the lower closure 13 to the body 11. The valve disc 25 is now in intimate forceful overlying contact relative to the aperture 30 due to the force F of gravity (FIGURE 3) of the product within the product chamber 17, the weight of the product chamber 17 itself, and the tendency of the product chamber 17 to rebound under the influence of inherent stresses toward the lower closure 13. In this manner, a propellant chamber 33 is normally closed to atmosphere by the valve disc 25 prior to the introduction of propellant into the propellant chamber 33 as will become immediately apparent hereafter.

Referring to FIGURE 4 of the drawings, a conventional propellant is introduced into the propellant cham ber 33 of the dispensing container 10 by accurately seating the lower closure 13 upon a filling head 36 which includes a sealing gasket 37 and a conduit 38 in fluid communication with the propellant source. A suitable valve (not shown) in the conduit 38 is opened and the propellant is introduced into the chamber 33 through the aperture 30 and a gap formed upon the upward move ment of the valve disc 25 and the bottom wall 22 of the product chamber 17 under the influence of the propellant as is graphically indicated by the unnumbered headed arrows in FIGURE 4 of the drawings. After a predetermined quantity of propellant has been introduced into the propellant chamber 33, the valve (not shown) in the conduit 38 is closed.

Referring now to FIGURE of the drawings, the propellant within the propellant chamber 33 migrates through the passages 24 between the valve disc 25 and the bottom wall 22 of the product chamber 17, as is illu trated by the unnumbered headed ar o s in FIG- URE 5. The propellant thereby acts with equal pressure axially upwardly against the wall 22 and axially downwardly against an upper surface (unnumbered) of the valve disc 25. During a dispensing operation, the propellant progressively collapses the product chamber 17 during which time the bottom wall 22 thereof compressively moves upwardly from the position illustrated in FIGURE 5 to a position adjacent the upper closure 12 (FIGURE 1). During the initial movement of the bottom wall 22 upwardly from the position shown in FIGURE 5, the adhesive 26 securing the valve disc 25 to the bottom wall 22 is ruptured or torn permitting the product chamber 17 to freely collapse and the propellant within the propellant chamber 33 to, 'in and of itself, maintain the valve disc 25 in sealing relationship to the aperture 30 during the life of the dispensing container 10.

It should be particularly noted that prior to the introduction of the propellant into the propellant chamber 33 a light compressive seal is effected between the valve disc 25 and the aperture 30 (FIGURE 3) while upon subsequent charging and dispensing of the container 10 this seal is effected and maintained solely under the influence of the force of the propellant within the propellant chamber 33 in the absence of auxiliary means of any type. This construction permits the dispensing container 10 to be manufactured at extremely low cost since the valve disc 25 and the adhesive 26 represent but a minor portion of the total manufacturing cost. Also, in a preferred form of the invention, the product chamber 17 is blowmolded by conventional apparatus which includes as a part thereof a pair of complementary split molds having lower cavities which define mirror images of the passages or grooves 24. The passages 24 are thereby formed during the blow-molding of the product chamber 17 and subsequent machining operations are unnecessary although it is considered within the scope of this invention to form the bottom wall 22 without the passages or grooves 24 and subsequently machine-form the same in the bottom surface 23.

Another dispensing container constructed in accordance with this invention is illustrated in FIGURES 7 and 8 of the drawings, and is generally designated by the reference numeral 40. The dispensing container 40 is identical to the dispensing container 10 and, while not illustrated, includes a dispensing mechanism coresponding to the mechanism 18 of the container 10.

The dispensing container 40 includes a container body 41 closed at axially opposite end portions by upper and lower closures 42, 43, respectively. The lower closure 43 is provided with a central aperture 44, corresponding to the aperture 30 of the closure 13. A product chamber 47 in the form of a collapsible bag-like structure is housed in the container body 41 and secured to an upper end portion thereof in the manner heretofore described with reference to the dispensing container 10. As compared to the product chamber 17, the product chamber 47 includes a beaded body 48 of a generally frusto-conical configuration having a wider lower end portion closed by a bottom'wall 50. A valve disc 51 is secured by adhesive 52 (FIGURE 8) to the exterior surface (unnumbered) of the bottom wall 50, and is in light compressing engagementwith the portion of the lower closure 43 defining the aperture 44. In the position of the components illustrated in FIGURE 7, propellant has not been introduced into a propellant chamber 52 and the sealing contact between the valve disc 51 and the aperture 44 is effected solely under the influence of gravity and the tendency of the collapsible product chamber 47 to rebound to its original longer length, as was heretofore noted with respect to the dispensing container 10.

The bottom wall 50 of the product chamber 47 is provided with a plurality of generally identical parallel passages 53 opening outwardly through a lower surface 54 of the wall 50. The passages or grooves 53 are formed in he bottom wall 50 in the manner heretofore described with respect to the passages 24, and the function of the passages 53 is to permit the propellant to act against the upper side (unnumbered) of the valve disc 51 to break the adhesive bond between the valve disc and the bottom wall upon the performance of a dispensing operation in the manner heretofore described particularly with reference to FIGURES 5 and 6 of the drawings.

Another novel dispensing container constructed in accordance with this invention is illustrated in FIGURE 9 of the drawings and is generally referred to by the reference numeral 60. The dispensing container 60' is identical to the dispensing container 40 of FIGURES 7 and 8 but with one exception. The generally frusto-conical configuration of a product chamber 61 of the dispensing container 60 is inverted relative to the position of the product chamber 47, i.e., the wider end portion of the collapsible product chamber 61 is disposed above and remote from a lower closure 62.

Another novel dispensing container constructed in accordance with this invention is illustarted in FIGURES through 12 of the drawings, and is generally designated by the reference numeral 70. The dispensing container 70 includes a dispensing mechanism (not shown) corresponding to the dispensing mechanism 18 of the container 10. A container body 71 of the dispensing container 70 includes an upper generally dome-shaped closure 72 and a lower closure 73 provided with an axial aperture at 74.

A collapsible product chamber 75 in the form of a beaded bag-like structure is secured at an upper end portion thereof (not shown) to the closure 72. A lower end portion (unnumbered) of the product chamber 75 is closed by a bottom wall 76 (FIGURE 12) from which depends an integral extension 77 which is generally T-shaped in transverse section, as is best illustrated in FIGURE 11 of the drawings. The extension 77 is preferably integrally formed with the product chamber 75 during a blow-molding operation, but it is within the scope of this invention to form the elements 75, 77 separately and adhesively or otherwise unite the extension 77 to the bottom wall 76 of the separately formed product chamber.

A valve disc 78 is temporarily adhesively secured to a lower face (unnumbered) of the extension 77 by adhesive 79. Due to the T-shaped or X-shaped configuration of the extension 77, propellant within a propellant chamber 80 of the dispenser 70 is free to act upon an upper surface 81 of the valve disc 78 as opposed to, for example, the provision of the passage means or grooves 24 of the dispensing container 10. That is, once a propellant has been introduced into the propellant chamber 80' and the dispensing operation takes place, the upward collapsing movement of the product chamber 75 draws the extension 76 upwardly while the valve disc 78 is maintained in the position illustrated in FIGURE 10 by the propellant acting against the upper surface '81 thereof. The bond between the valve disc 78 and the extension 77 is subsequently broken and the valve disc 78 is thereafter retained in position sealing the aperture 74 solely under the influence of propellant within the chamber 80 acting against the upper surface 81 of the valve disc 78.

In each of the dispensing containers 10, 40, 60 and 70 heretofore described, the respective valve discs are each adhesively bonded to bottom walls of the respective collapsible product chambers 17, 47, 61 and 75. However, in accordance with another feature of this invention, it is unnecessary to positively secure a valve disc to an associated product chamber, as will be readily apparent from FIGURE 13 of the drawings in which is illustrated a lower end portion of a dispensing container 90 which is substantially identical to the dispensing container 10. The dispensing container 90 includes a container body 91 having an upper end portion and a dispensing mechanism (both not shown) corresponding to the upper end portion of the container 10 of FIGURE 4. A bottom end of the container body 91 is closed by a generally dome-shaped lower closure 92 having an end panel 93 secured by a double seam 94 to the container body. A central portion 95 of the end panel 93 is recessed to define a generally cylindrical upwardly opening chamber 96. The central portion 95 of the end panel 93 is apertured at 97.

A valve disc 98 is seated in the chamber 96 of the lower closure 92 in overlying relationship to the aperture 97. The recessed portion 95 of the end panel 93 thereby serves to accurately locate the valve disc 98 and maintain the same in overlying sealing relationship to the aperture 97. A collapsible product chamber 100 having a bottom wall 102 and passage means 103 is secured to the container body 91 in a manner heretofore described. The product chamber 100 is identical to the product chamber 17 and, in the position illustrated in FIGURE 13, the bottom wall 102 is in lightly contacting abutment with an upper surface (unnumbered) of the valve disc 98. The relationship of the components of the dispenser are illustrated in FIGURE 13 prior to the introduc tion of suitable pressurized propellant into a propellant chamber 104 in the manner heretofore described.

The dispensing container 90 is assembled substantially in the manner heretofore described relative to the dispensing container 10. However, rather than adhesively bonding the valve disc 98 to the bottom wall 102 of the product chamber 100 prior to inserting the lower closure 92 into the container body and forming the double seam 94, the valve disc 98 is merely placed in the chamber 96 before the end panel 93 of the closure 92 is inserted into the lower end portion (unnumbered) of the container body 91 causing the valve disc 98 to be clampingly confined between the bottom wall 102 of the chamber 100 and the recessed portion during the formation of the double seam 94.

After the chamber has been filled with a product and closed in a conventional manner, upon the introduction of a propellant into the propellant chamber 104 the valve disc 98 is temporarily unseated in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 4 of the drawings although it is to be noted that the valve disc 98 is at no time completely removed from the chamber 96.

After the chamber 104 is filled to a desired capacity the passages 103 provide an access for the propellant between exposed surfaces of the bottom wall 102 and the upper surface (unnumbered) of the valve disc 98. The greater internal pressure of the propellant, as compared to the pressure of atmosphere acting upon the underside of the valve disc 98 through the aperture 97 forces the valve disc 98 into highly compressive sealing engagement with the panel portion 95, and upon upward collapsing movement of the product chamber 100 during a dispensing operation, the valve disc 98 is maintained in this position solely under the influence of the propellant pressure.

Referring now to FIGURE 14 of the drawings, a dispensing container 105 is shown having a lower closure 106 secured to a body 107 of the container 105 by means of a double seam 108. A generally dome-shaped end panel 110 of the closure 106 is apertured at 111.

A collapsible product chamber 112 in the form of a beaded bag-like structure is positioned in the body 107 and secured thereto in the manner heretofore described with respect to the dispensing container 10. The product chamber 112 includes a lower end portion (unnumbered) closed by a relatively thick bottom wall 113 having a central downwardly opening recess 114. The recess 114 is preferably, though not necessarily, circular in configuration and a surface (unnumbered) thereof opposing the end panel 110 is provided with a plurality of passages or grooves 115. Closure means in the form of a valve disc 116 which corresponds to the valve discs heretofore described is partially received in the chamber 114 and sandwiched between the chamber and the end panel 110 in overlying relationship to the aperture 111. As in the case of the valve disc 98, the valve disc 116 is not 7 adhesively bonded or otherwise fixedly secured to the bottom wall 113 of the product chamber 112.

The dispensing container 105 is filled with a dispensable product and propellant is charged into a propellant chamber 117 thereof in a manner substantially identical to that heretofore described. However, during the insertion of the end panel 110 into the container body 107 prior to the formation of the seam 101 care must be taken to prevent the valve disc 116 from inadvertently or accidentally slipping from a position overlying and axially aligned with the aperture 111. During this assembly of the closure and the container body, the valve disc 116 is maintained in position upon the end panel 110 only by frictional forces. However, once the valve disc 116 is at least partially received within the chamber 114 slight relative movement between the valve disc 116, the bottom wall 113 and the end panel 110 is permissible and inadvertent dislocation of the valve disc 116 is thereafter prevented by the annular wall (unnumbered) of the chamber 114.

While each of the dispensing containers 90, 105 have been described as being devoid of adhesive or similar bonding means between the respective bottom walls of the product chambers and the valve discs thereof, it is to be understood that an adhesive of low bond strength may be employed to fixedly secure the valve discs to the respective product chamber bottom walls. Also, while the dispensing containers 10, 40, 60 and 70 have been described as including adhesive or similar securing means to secure the valve discs to the respective product chamber bottom Walls, the adhesive may, in accordance with this invention, be eliminated. For example, in the case of the dispensing container 10, the valve disc 25 may be merely seated in overlying relationship to the aperture 30 of the lower closure 13 prior to the assembly of the closure 13 and the body 11. Once the end panel 28 is inserted into the container body, the valve dis 25 is clampingly retained in position between the bottom wall 22 and the portion of the end panel 28 contacting the valve disc 25. As propellant is introduced into the pro pellant chamber 33 the valve disc 25 is maintained in its position by the force of the propellant acting against the undersurface (unnumbered) of the valve disc 25. During this charging operation, relatively little movement of the valve disc 25 will occur and upon the subsequent cutting-off of the propellant, the propellant within the chamber 33 acting against the product chamber 17 will immediately force the valve disc 25 into intimate forceful contact with the end panel 28, in the manner illustrated in FIGURE of the drawings. Thus, in each of the embodiments of the invention adhesive may or may not be employed between the bottom walls of the product chambers and associated valve discs.

From the foregoing, it Will be seen that novel and advantageous provisions have been made for carrying out the desired end. However, attention is again directed to the fact that additional variations may be made in this invention without departing from the spirit and scope thereof as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A dispensing container comprising a body including product chamber means for receiving a dispensable product and propellant chamber means for receiving a pressurized propellant, aperture means for introducing a propellant into said propellant chamber means, and closure means normally closing said aperture means and being maintained in said closed position by said product chamber means directly contacting said closure means prior to the performance of a dispensing operation.

2. The dispensing container as defined in claim 1 Wherein means are provided for accurately locating said closure means in said closed position.

3. The dispensing container as defined in claim 1 Wherein means are provided for securing said closure means to said product chamber means.

iii)

4. The dispensing container as defined in claim 1 wherein means are provided for securing said closure means to said product chamber means prior to the performance of a dispensing operation, and means are provided for releasing said securing means whereby said closure means is released from said product chamber means.

5. The dispensing container as defined in claim 1 wherein said body includes lower closure means, said aperture means is formed in said lower closure means, said product chamber means is a bag-like structure, and a closed end portion of said bag-like structure normally contacts and maintains said closure means in overlying relationship to said aperture means.

6. The dispensing container as defined in claim 4 wherein said releasing means is defined by passage means between said closure means and said product chamber means.

7. The dispensing container as defined in claim 5 Wherein means are provided for accurately locating said closure means in said closed position.

8. The dispensing container as defined in claim 5 wherein said closure means is a disc-like element having a surface portion in contact with a surface portion of said bag-like structure closed end portion, and means are provided for assuring discontact between said surface portions upon the movement of said bag-like structure during a dispensing operation.

9. The dispensing container as defined in claim 8 wherein said assuring means is defined 'by a multi-planar surface configuration of at least one of said surface portions whereby pressurized propellant acting against the surface portion of said element coupled with the movement of said bag-like structure effects discontact between said surface portions during a dispensing operation.

10. The dispensing container as defined in claim 8 wherein means are provided for temporarily connecting said disc-like element to said closed end portion and said assuring means is further effective to disconnect said connecting means during a dispensing operation.

11. The dispensing container as defined in claim 2 wherein said body includes lower closure means, said aperture means is formed in said lower closure means, and said locating means is a recess in said lower closure means in which said aperture closure means is normally seated.

12. The dispensing container as defined in claim 3 wherein said securing means is an adhesive for temporarily securing said closure means to said product chamber means.

13. The dispensing container as defined in claim 5 wherein said closed end portion of said bag-like structure includes a bottom wall, and said bottom wall further includes an integral axial extension which contacts and maintains said closure means in overlying relationship to said aperture means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Re. 24,918 1/1961 Mills 222-386.5 2,937,791 5/1960 Micallef 222- 3,112,846 12/1963 Hein 222402.l6 3,365,105 1/1968 Krizka 22295 X FOREIGN PATENTS 1,316,596 12/1962 France.

ROBERT B. REEVES, Primary Examiner F. R. HANDREN, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 222-l07, 482

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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/95, 222/482, 222/107
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/62
European ClassificationB65D83/62