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Publication numberUS3484877 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 23, 1969
Filing dateDec 18, 1967
Priority dateDec 18, 1967
Publication numberUS 3484877 A, US 3484877A, US-A-3484877, US3484877 A, US3484877A
InventorsEdward A Petersen
Original AssigneeEdward A Petersen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cantilevered transfer support for wheelchairs and wheelchair incorporating the same
US 3484877 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 23, 1969 E. A. PETERSEN CANTILEVERED TRANSFER SUPPORT FOR WHEELCHAIRS AND WHEELCHAIR INCORPORATING THE SAME Flled Dec 18 1967 INVENTOR. Ears 44w A. PE TE/QSAEN flrrwQ/vamg -(4qgllllllla 22 United States Patent 3,484,877 CANTILEVERED TRANSFER SUPPORT FOR WHEELCHAIRS AND WHEELCHAIR IN- CORPORATING THE SAME Edward A. Petersen, 13761 /z Locust, Westminster, Calif. 92683 Filed Dec. 18, 1967, Ser. No. 691,458 Int. Cl. A61g 5/00, 7/10 US. Cl. 5-86 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A transfer support which permits a paraplegic to move from a wheelchair into a bed, automobile, etc. The support comprises a board having a leg which is mounted in the front socket for the armrest of the wheelchair. The board is also supported upon a drive Wheel of the wheelchair, which serves not only to complete the mounting of the board but also to lock such drive Wheel against rotation.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention This invention relates to the art of wheelchairs, and more particularly to the art of devices for permitting paraplegics and certain types of quadriplegics to transfer themselves between wheelchairs and automobiles, beds, and the like.

Description of the prior art The most pertinent construction known to applicant is a bridge board which is presently on the market and is adapted to bridge the gap between a wheelchair and a car seat, bed, etc. Such bridge board is, however, characterized by numerous deficiencies some of which are as follows:

(a) It is hingedly or pivotally related to the wheelchair by means of a generally U-shaped mounting bracket the legs of which rest in both the front and rear armrest sockets of the chair. Since the relationship is pivotal, the board may not be used unless the distal end thereof is actually resting upon the horizontal upper surface of a car seat, bed, etc. Accordingly, the bridge board must extend a substantial distance from the wheelchair and must lap a substantial distance over the car seat or other surface to which the user is attempting to transfer himself. Because of the overlapping relationship, the user must move a major distance away from the wheelchair before he is no longer supported upon the bridge board. Such substantial distance makes it difficult to complete the transfer, difi'icult to demount the bridge board after the transfer, and difficult to manipulate the wheelchair (as by folding it up and placing it in the rear seat of an automobile) after the transfer.

(b) Another major disadvantage of the overlapping, pivotally-mounted bridge board is that it is diflicult or impossible for the user to manipulate himself onto a surface which is substantially higher than the upper surface of the wheelchair seat. When the bridge board is resting upon a surface which is substantially higher than the wheelchair seat, the bridge board is inclined at a considerable angle to the horizontal. This slide or chute relationship makes it difiicult or impossible for many users to make the transfer from a wheelchair to certain types of car seats, beds, etc.

(c) Wheelchairs are conventionally equipped with wheel looks, but it may occur that the user forgets to lock the wheels of the chair prior to attempting transfer from wheelchair to a car seat or vice versa. When such event occurs, all wheels of the wheelchair are completely 3,484,877 Patented Dec. 23, 1969 free to move, Which maximizes the likelihood of movement of the chair and consequent falling of the user into the space between the chair and the object onto which he is attempting to transfer himself. The indicated presently-marketed construction makes no provision for insuring that at least one drive wheel of the chair is locked during transfer.

(d) The user may, for example, wish to leave the automobile on the opposite side from that through which he entered the same. With the indicated bridge board construction, this cannot be done unless certain troublesome adjustments are made. It therefore follows that, as a practical matter, the user is obliged to enter and leave the automobile on the same side at all times.

(e) Each user of a wheelchair has an individualized set of requirements, which may necessitate different size boards, different board elevations, etc. Furthermore, there are several different sizes of chairs, which are known as junior chairs, senior chairs, etc. With the indicated pres ently-marketed device, it is difiicult or excessively expensive to market boards meeting the individualized requirements of various users and various types of chairs. This is because the above-indicated U-shaped mounting bracket and/or the associated hinge means, must be altered in order to change the elevation of the board, in order to adapt the board for mounting on different types of chairs wherein the front and rear armrest sockets are spaced different distances apart, etc. I

(f) Because the indicated presently-marketed construc tion requires the use of both front and rear sockets in order to support the bridge board, it is difficult for the user to remove the bridge board after he has transferred himself into an automobile, etc. It is also diflicult to re,- mount the bridge board on the wheelchair.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides a highly simple manner of removably cantilevering a transfer board at one side of the wheelchair while at the same time automatically locking the adjacent main drive wheel of the chair. It is characterized by the following, and other, advantages in comparison to the above-indicated and other constructions:

(a) Because the transfer board is cantilevered, the distal edge thereof is not supported upon the upper surface of the bed or car seat, etc., but instead is independently supported by the wheelchair and is brought into close abutment with the vertical face at the edge of the bed or car seat. Thus, for example, when the user is making a transfer from wheelchair to car seat, he can support himself on the car seat after only a very minimum movement away from the wheelchair which movement is effected with minimum ease. Since the user is then sitting on the car seat, etc., at the extreme seat edge adjacent the chair, it is very simple for the user to remove the transfer board from the wheelchair, and thereafter fold the wheelchair and place it in the rear seat of the automobile.

(b) Also because the transfer board is cantilevered, it is assured that the surface of the board will always be parallel to the surface of the wheelchair seat, instead of being inclined relative thereto. This produces many major advantages one of which is that the user may, with perfect safety, and without danger of falling, breaking his legs, etc., elevate himself onto a surface which is a substantial number of inches higher than the upper surface of the wheelchair seat.

(0) One of the supporting elements. for the present transfer board is a main or drive wheel of the wheelchair. A locking relationship is thus automatically created between the transfer board and such wheel, which makes it certain that such wheel is always locked during 3 use of the transfer board. This reduces the likelihood that the inadvertent neglect to lock the wheels of the wheelchair will result in injury to the user.

(d) Because the present transfer board has only one leg and fits in only the front armrest socket of the wheelchair, the rear support for the board being effected by the adjacent main wheel of the chair, it follows that the same board may be utilized on either the right or left side of the wheelchair, without the necessity for making any adjustment whatsoever. Accordingly, the user may enter the left side of a car, for example, and may leave through the right side thereof, without the necessity for making any manipulations or adjustments of the transfer board.

(e) Because the present transfer board has only one leg, which leg is simply and economically manufactured in different lengths, both the elevation of the board and the size thereof may be readily adapted to the requirements of a particular user, without increasing the manufacturing cost in any major respect.

(f) The single-leg construction of the present board makes it exceedingly simple for the user to remove the board from the wheelchair after he has transferred him self into a car or onto a bed. correspondingly, mounting of the board onto the wheelchair is very easy.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIGURE 1 is an isometric view illustrating the transfer support of the invention, and the combination transfer support and wheelchair, in condition for a transfer of a user into or out of the wheelchair;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line 22 of FIGURE 1 and illustrating the locking relationship between the transfer board and the associated wheel;

FIGURE 3 is an isometric view illustrating the transfer board of the present invention in inverted condition; and

FIGURE 4 illustrates the relationship between the wheelchair-transfer board and an associated bed, the latter having a surface which is substantially higher than that of the seat of the wheelchair.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The present transfer support is adapted to be employed in combination with a wheelchair of the type having removable armrests or arms. Such a wheelchair is illustrated in FIGURE 1 as comprising a frame on which are mounted two main drive wheels 11 and two caster wheels 12, the latter being located in advance of the drive wheels. Drive wheels 11 are large in diameter, the upper portions thereof extending a considerable distance above the seat portion 13 of the wheelchair, such seat portion being suitably supported from frame 10.

Stated more definitely, frame 10 has vertical forward leg elements 14 to which are fixedly secured, in vertical relationship, tubular forward or front socket elements 15 for the removable armrests or arms 16 of the chair. Only one such armrest 16 is illustrated in the drawings, since the armrest on the side where it is desired to mount the transfer support is removed prior to mounting thereof. There are corresponding socket elements at the rear portion of the chair and which receive rear portions of the armrests 16, but these are not illustrated in the drawings since they are not employed in the present invention.

The remaining portions of the chair comprise a conventional back 17, FIGURE 4, and also comprise leg supports or leg rest elements 18 which extend forwardly from the frame 10. The drive wheels are provided with suitable handrails 19 adapted to be grasped by the operator in order to propel the chair.

The transfer apparatus of the present invention comprises a board 22 having a single leg 23 adapted to be inserted into the forward armrest socket element 15 after removal of the armrest which is normally mounted therein. Means 24 are provided to mount at least one corner of the board 22 in supported and locking relationship relative to the adjacent drive wheel 11 of the wheelchair. In addition, means 25 are provided to support the board 22 in cantilevered relationship from leg 23, and to limit the degree of insertion of the leg into the socket 15 in order to regulate the elevation of the board relative to seat portion 13 of the wheelchair.

The board 22 is illustrated as being generally square, for example twelve inches by twelve inches, but it is to be understood that the exact size is determined in large part by the characteristics of the individual user. The board may be constructed of plywood, metal, etc., and may be suitably padded and provided with a protective covering of plastic or other material.

The dimension of the board 22 parallel to the normal direction of the movement of the wheelchair is sufficient that the board may support the user after he has slid onto the board from the seat 13. The dimension of the board transverse to the normal direction of movement of the wheelchair is sufficient to permit support of the user as stated above, and also is sufficient to bridge the gap which is normally present between the wheelchair and the front seat of an automobile, for example.

The leg 23 is fixedly connected at its upper end to one corner of board 22, such corner being numbered 27 in FIGURE 1. The lower end of the leg 23 is shaped for insertion into the front armrest socket 15, the amount of insertion being sufficient that the socket 15 will restrain the lower leg end from pivoting about a horizontal axis when the weight of the user is applied to the board 22.

The mounting and lock means 24 is provided on the same edge of the board 22 as that on which the leg 23 is mounted. Preferably, there are two mounting and lock means 24 in order to permit the apparatus to be employed on either side of the wheelchair. Thus, a mounting and lock means 24 is provided at each of the corners numbered 28 and 29 in FIGURES l-3.

Each of the illustrated mounting and lock means 24 comprises a mounted, recessed or notched portion 31 of the underside of board 22. Such portion 31 is shaped to nest or seat over the tire 20 of each drive wheel 11. It follows that, when the user is supported on board 22, the downward pressure present at the interface between notched portion 31 and tire 20 will lock the wheel 11 against rotation. It will also insure that the board 22 does not pivot about a vertical axis through leg 23 and socket 15.

To provide further assurance against pivotal movement of the board 22 about a vertical axis through leg 23, the illustrated mounting and lock means 24 additionally comprises a generally bifurcated or U-shaped clip 32 the arms of which are shaped to fit resiliently over opposite sides of tire 20. Each clip 32 is aligned with the associated routed region or notch 31, the relationship being such that when the clip is pushed downwardly over tire 20 the notched portion 31 will seat upon such tire. A suitable mark or indication, not shown, is provided on the upper surface of board 22 immediately above the center of clip 32 in order to indicate to the user when the clip is positioned directly over the tire 20.

It is pointed out that comers 27 and 29 are at opposite ends of one edge 33 of the board 22, whereas the corners 27 and 28 are at opposite ends of an adjacent edge 34 of the board.

Proceeding next to a description of support means 25, this comprises three braces or struts 3638 which extend, respectively, from the leg 23 to the three corners of the board which are remote from such leg. More specifically, each brace or strut 3638 is welded or otherwise suitably connected to a collar 39 which, in turn, is welded or otherwise fixedly associated with leg 23 at a region spaced from the end of such leg and also from the base thereof.

In the illustrated construction, an angle brace 41 is fixedly secured, for example by means of suitable screws, to the underside of board 22 along edges 33 and 34 thereof. Struts 36 and 38 extend from collar 39 to the ends of angle brace 41 which are adjacent the respective corners 29 and 28. The remaining strut, number 37, extends from collar 39 to a foot plate 42 which is secured by screws to the remaining corner, numbered 43, of the board 22. The angle brace 41 further serves as a means for effecting rigid mounting of the leg 23 to the board 22.

The collar 39 serves not only to anchor the struts 36- 38 but as a stop which limits the downward insertion of leg 23 into socket 15. Other stop means could be employed, for example at the bottom of socket 15.

OPERATION The apparatus will first be described in conjunction with its use in entering and leaving an automobile. Thereafter, and with reference to FIGURE 4, the apparatus will be described in conjunction with its use in getting onto a bed. It is pointed out that both of the chair arms 16 are normally in mounted positions in their respective sockets.

The user, when he desires to enter the front seat of an automobile, opens the front door of the auto, and then positions the wheelchair so that one side thereof (for example, the left side of the chair) is adjacent the front seat of the auto. The operator then removes the left armrest (not shown) and places it in the auto, normally in the rear seat. He then grasps the board 22 (which normally is stored in the automobile), inserts the leg 23 in socket 15, and pushes down on corner 28 to snap the associated clip 32 over the tire 20.

The positioning of the wheelchair is caused to be such that the edge of board 22 remote from seat 13 (denoted by the reference numeral 44 in FIGURE 1) is closely adjacent the front car seat at substantially the same elevation as the upper surface of such seat. Edge 44 does not overlap the car seat but instead is close to being in endwise abutment relative thereto.

The user then employs his arms to slide his torso into supported relationship on the board 22, the legs of the user then remaining on one or both of the leg supports 18. He next employs his arms to move his legs from the supports 18 into the automobile passenger compartment forwardly of the front seat. After his legs are in proper position in the vehicle, the user emplodys his arms to grasp the car seat (or suitable supporting elements) and thereby shift his torso off the board 22 and onto the portion of the front car seat which is immediately adjacent edge 44. As above indicated, it is a very important feature of the invention that the user need only move a short distance away from the wheelchair seat 13 before he is off the board 22 and sitting on the edge portion of the car seat.

Because the user is still close to the wheelchair, it is a simple matter for him to use only one hand in grasping the board 22 and lifting upwardly thereon, so that the leg 23 moves out of the socket 15. Board 22 is then placed in the rear seat of the vehicle, following which the remainder of the wheelchair is folded up by the user and also put in the rear seat of the vehicle.

It is emphasized that the weight of the average user is supported entirely by the board 22 during the transfer operation, not by the vehicle seat. However, in the case of very heavy individuals, weighing on the order of 200 pounds, the wheelchair may tend to tip over in response to the moment exerted downwardly on the board 22. Even then, however, the wheelchair may not tip over since the edge 44 of board 22 engages the vertical edge surface at the end of the automobile seat.

As previously explained, the relationship between the elements 31-32 and tire 20 not only prevents pivoting of board 22 about a vertical axis through leg 23, but also locks the tire 20 and thus the entire drive wheel 11 of the wheelchair.

To leave the automobile and enter the wheelchair, the above procedure is reversed. It is, however, an important feature of the present invention that the user may, if desired, exit through the automobile door on the opposite side from that through which he entered. Thus, in the case of the above illustration, let it be assumed that the operator wishes to exit from the left side of the automobile whereas he entered through the right side thereof. To do this, the Wheelchair is first lifted out of the back seat and unfolded in a position adjacent the left side of the vehicle, following which an armrest 16 is mounted in position but on the opposite side of the wheelchair from that shown in FIGURE 1. The board 22 is then mounted in position, but on the right side of the wheelchair instead of on the left side. This is readily accomplished, without any adjustment or manipulation of any means whatsoever, by merely causing the corner 29 of board 22 to be over the right drive wheel of the wheelchair, such corner 29 being provided with mounting and locking elements 31-32 which correspond to those utilized when board 22 is in the position of FIGURE 1.

After the user has slid out onto the chair seat 13, he demounts the board 22, places it in the vehicle, mounts the remaining armrest 16 in position, and is ready to use the wheelchair.

Referring next to FIGURE 4, let it be assumed that the user wishes to raise himself onto a bed 45 the upper surface 46 of which is substantial distance above, for example four or five inches, the upper surface of chair seat 13. It is to be understood, however, that the same principle applies to automobile seats which are higher than a chair seat or, conversely, are lower than a chair seat.

For such an operation, it is advantageous that transfer support be employed which is so constructed that the upper surface of board 22 is several inches higher than the upper surface of seat 13. Thus, board 22 acts as an intermediate stairstep or platform which is parallel to both the seat 13 and the bed surface 46. There is no inclined slide or chute relationship which makes it impossible for the average user to manipulate himself.

Although the board 22 is then several inches above seat 13, the average user, for example by grasping suitable unshown apparatus associated with bed 45, can readily lift himself onto the board or stairstep 22. Once he is seated on the board 22, he grasps his legs with his arms and lifts such legs onto the bed surface 46. After his legs are on the bed surface, the user employs his arms to lift his torso onto the bed surface 46. Because of the described operation, there is no substantial possibility that the user will break his legs or will fall into the space between the wheelchair and the bed. As described above, the edge 44 is brought into close abutment with the vertical face of the mattress or other side portion of the bed 45.

It is an added feature of the invention that the board 22 serves advantageously as a night stand, this being contrasted with constructions in which the transfer element performs no useful function after the user is in bed.

It is emphasized that the present construction makes it extremely simple to provide the board 22 at different elevations, and to provide boards 22 of different widths. This may be accomplished by merely causing the leg 23 to be longer and by placing an extra collar (not shown) adjacent the one indicated at 39. The added length of the leg 23, and the width of the additional collar, are selected to raise the board 22 to the desired elevation. In addition, the board is caused to be sufficiently wider that the corner 28 (or 29 as the case may be) will engage the tire 20 as indicated in FIGURE 2, despite the fact that a portion of the tire more remote from the supporting surface is contacted. In other words, the length of the leg (between board and collar) is correlated to the width of the board in such manner that collar 39 is seated on socket at the same time that notch 31 seats on tire 20.

The above may be done not only during construction, for example by making the board 22 overhang or cantilever from the angle brace 41 and foot plate 42, but also after construction by providing suitable adapter means at the socket 15 (and/or leg 23') and at the corners 28 and 29. In similar manner, the board 22 may be lowered to a position below the upper surface of the chair seat 13.

It is emphasized that the present transfer board may be used not only by paraplegics but by certain types of quadriplegics, for example those having use of their arms but not their hands.

It should be further noted that paraplegics and quadriplegicsfrequently have very poor senses of balance, making it important that it be possible to disassemble the unit with only one hand and without leaning an excessive distance outwardly from the car seat.

I claim:

1. A cantilevered transfer support for use on a wheelchair of the type having removable armrests, which comprises:

a board adapted to support the user of the wheelchair,

said board having one edge adapted to be positioned adjacent one side edge of the seat portion of the wheelchair whereby the user may readily transfer himself from said seat portion onto said board,

said board also having another edge on the opposite side of said board from said one edge thereof and adapted to be positioned adjacent a vertical side face of a bed or seat whereby to permit the user to transfer himself from said board onto said bed or seat,

a leg mounted on said board at one end portion of said one edge thereof and adapted to be inserted into the front armrest socket of said wheelchair,

said leg and socket being so shaped that said leg may rotate in said socket about a vertical axis, and

wheel-engaging means provided at the other end portion of said one edge for mounting in supported relationship on the main drive wheel of said wheelchair to the rear of said front armrest socket,

said wheel-engaging means including means to prevent said rotation of said leg about said axis.

2. A cantilevered transfer support for use on a wheelchair of the type having removable armrests, which comprises:

a board adapted to support the user of the wheelchair,

said board having one edge adapted to be positioned adjacent one side edge of the seat portion of the wheelchair whereby the user may readily transfer himself from said seat portion onto said board,

said board also having another edge on the opposite side of said board from said one edge thereof and adapted to be positioned adjacent a vertical side face of a bed or seat whereby to permit the user to transfer himself from said board onto said bed or seat,

a leg mounted on said board at one end portion of said one edge thereof and adapted to be inserted into the front armrest socket of said wheelchair, and

wheel-engaging means provided at the other end portion of said one edge for mounting in supported relationship on the main drive wheel of said wheelchair to the rear of said front armrest socket,

said wheel-engaging means seating on the tire portion of said main drive wheel and locking said wheel against rotation.

3. The invention as claimed in claim 2, in which said wheel-engaging means comprises a recessed portion of said board, said recessed portion being shaped to seat on the tire portion of said main drive wheel.

4. The invention as claimed in claim 2, in which said wheel-engaging means includes means shaped for mounting in straddling relationship over the tire portion of said main drive wheel.

5. The invention as claimed in claim 2, in which said wheel-engaging means comprises a recessed portion of said board, said recessed portion being shaped to seat on the tire portion of said main drive wheel, said wheel-engaging means also including means shaped for mounting in straddling relationship over the tire portion of said main drive wheel.

6. A cantilevered transfer support for use on a wheelchair of the type having removable armrests, which comprises:

a board adapted to support the user of the wheelchair,

said board having one edge adapted to be positioned adjacent one side edge of the seat portion of the wheelchair whereby the user may readily transfer himself from said seat portion onto said board,

said board also having another edge on the opposite side of said board from said one edge thereof and adapted to be positioned adjacent a vertical side face of a bed or seat whereby to permit the user to transfer himself from said board onto said bed or seat,

a leg mounted on said board at one end portion of said one edge thereof and adapted to be inserted into the front armrest socket of said wheelchair,

stop means to limit the degree of insertion of said leg into said socket, and

wheel-engaging means provided at the other end portion of said one edge for mounting in supported relationship 0n the main drive wheel of said wheelchair to the rear of said front armrest socket,

said wheel-engaging means being so correlated tb said stop means that said wheel-engaging means seats on the tire portion of said main drive wheel when said leg is inserted into said socket to the full extent permitted by said stop means.

7. A combination transfer support and wheelchair, which comprises:

a wheelchair having a removable armrest on each side of the seat thereof,-

said armrests having support portions adapted to be inserted into front sockets provided on said Wheelchair in advance of the main drive wheels thereof,

said wheels being large in diameter and extending upwardly to elevations substantially above the elevations of said front sockets,

a board adapted to support the user of said wheelchair,

said board having one edge positioned adjacent one side edge of the seat portion of said wheelchair whereby the user may readily transfer himself from said seat portion onto said board, said board also having another edge on the opposite side of said board from said one edge thereof and adapted to be positioned adjacent a vertical side face of a bed or seat whereby to permit the user to transfer himself from said board onto said bed or seat,

a leg mounted on said board at one end portion of said one edge thereof and inserted into one of said front sockets of said wheelchair, and

wheel-engaging means provided at the other end portion of said one edge and mounted in supported rela- 9 10 tionship on the main drive wheel of said wheelchair to 3,344,445 10/ 1967 Crawford 5-81 X the rear of said one front socket. 3,376,065 4/1968 Kernes 297-414 References Cited CASMIR A. NUNBERG, Primary Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 Us CL XR 3,329,978 7/1967 Porter et a1 5-81 3,341,864 9/1967 Wichmann 297--41 6 X 297416, 429

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3329978 *Feb 26, 1965Jul 11, 1967Robert E PorterStretcher-operating table bridging panel
US3341864 *Sep 3, 1965Sep 19, 1967Wichmann Leon GPortable toilet for attachment to a wheelchair
US3344445 *Aug 12, 1966Oct 3, 1967Institutional Ind IncSide panel construction for stretcher-beds
US3376065 *Oct 31, 1966Apr 2, 1968Hownet CorpRemovable armrest assembly for invalid wheel chairs
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4287619 *Mar 19, 1979Sep 8, 1981Brewer William RMulti-purpose chair for the partially disabled
US5207549 *Feb 28, 1991May 4, 1993Matthew RivaTransfer seat to be used between a wheelchair and an automobile seat
US6721966May 9, 2002Apr 20, 2004Sherry CostondeTransfer board
US7305726 *Sep 14, 2005Dec 11, 2007Augustine Larry JWheelchair with integrated transfer board
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/86.1, 297/411.26
International ClassificationA61G7/10, A61G5/10, A61G3/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61G7/103, A61G5/101, A61G5/10, A61G3/06, A61G2200/34, A61G7/1046
European ClassificationA61G3/06, A61G5/10, A61G7/10S6, A61G7/10P4