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Publication numberUS3484970 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 23, 1969
Filing dateMar 22, 1968
Priority dateMar 22, 1968
Publication numberUS 3484970 A, US 3484970A, US-A-3484970, US3484970 A, US3484970A
InventorsBerlinsky Anthony A, Krebeck Norman C, Pearson Gordon W, Varson Robert J
Original AssigneeCommerce Usa
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic sheet turner using a rotating vacuum head
US 3484970 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 23, 1969 A. A. BERLINSKY ET AL 3,484,970

AUTOMATIC SHEET TURNER USING A ROTATNG VACUUM HEAD Filed March 22, 1968 6 Sheets-Sheet l Gordon W Peamon Norman C. Krebeck By www ATTORNEY Dec. 23, 1969 A. A. BERLINSKY ET AL U 3,484,970

AUTOMATIC SHEET TURNER USING A ROTATING VACUUM HEAD Filed March 22, 1968 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 AUTOMATIC SHEET TURNER USING A ROTATING VACUUM HEAD Filed March 22, 1968 Dec. 23, 1969 A. A. BERLINSKY ET Al. 3,484,970

AUTOMATIC SHEET TURNER USING A ROTATING VACUUM HEAD Filed March 22, 1968 6 Sheets-snee?l 4 Dec. 23, 1969 A. A. BERLINSKY ET AL AUTOMATIC SHEET TURNER USING A ROTATNG VACUUM HEAD Filed MarOh 22, 1968 6 Sheets-Sheet Dec. 23, 1969 A, A, BERLINSKY ET AL 3,484,970

AUTOMATIC SHEET TURNER USING A ROTATING VACUUM HEAD Filed March 22 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 SOURCE OF- VACUUM United States Patent O 3,484,970 "AUTOMATIC SHEET TURNER USING A i ROTATING VACUUM HEAD Anthony A.- Berlinsky, Silver Spring, Md., and Robert J. Varson, Gordon W. Pearson, and Norman C. Krebeck, Washington, D.C., assignors to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of Commercf Filed Mar. 22, 1968, Ser. No. 715,343 Int. Cl. G09f 11/06 U.S. Cl. 40--104 7 Claims ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE An arrangement is described for turning the sheets of a booklet. A vacuum head is rotated on an arm and is also rotated around its longitudinal axis. As the head engages the edge of a sheet, it is attracted to the head and turned. The sheet is then flattened by a brush or roller.

BACKGROUND lOF THE INVENTION This invention may be used to automatically turn and flatten the sheets of a booklet when the pages of the booklet are to be photographed on microiilrn. The sheets are attened to obtain a high degree of uniformity of reduction in taking the photograph. This is desirable when the microfilm is -to be used with a scanner that requires a high degree of precision in the location of marking positions on the sheets and in particular when the sheets have been folded before being photographed.

The scanner could be of the type used in the FOSDIC System (a. lm optical sensing device for input computers) and the booklets could be census questionnaires. When the questionnaires are receive-d at the Bureau of Census, an image of each page is transferred to 16 mm. microtilm. The ilm is fed into the FOSDIC System where each part of the recorded information is located by means of related marking positions on the film. The information is then scanned and concisely recorded on magnetic tape ready for computer input.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In one embodiment of the inventive concept, a booklet is placed on a table and is held in a flattened position by means of vacuum. A vacuum head is rotated around its longitudinal axis and is also rotated in a selected plane on the end of a rotating arm. A source of vacuum is applied to the head during a time interval that starts prior to when the vacuum head engages an edge of a sheet of the booklet and extends to the time after the head passes the center of the booklet. As the head engages the edge of the sheet, it is attracted to the head by means of vacnum, and as the head continues to rotate the. sheet is turned. A brush is positioned to sweep the sheet during a time interval that starts after the sheet has been turned, and thereby ilattens it against the vacuum able.

In another embodiment, after the sheet is turned a roller, instead of the brush, attens the sheet against the vacuum table.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. l is a pictorial view of the arrangement for rotating the vacuum heads and brushes used in the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a partial side view of the `arrangement shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a top view of the structure represented in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 represents a section taken along the longitudinal axis of a vacuum head in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a top view of the vacuum chamber plate and 3,484,970 Patented Dec. 23, 1969 its related gear `as well as a section of the associated shaft illustrated in FIG. 2;

FIGS. 6 and 7 represent a brush and its support and control -mechanism use-d in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6A is a side View of the structure shown in FIG. 6;

FIG. 7A is a side view of the structure shown in FIG. 7;

FIGS. 8 and 9, and 10 represent the operation of a vacuum head and brush as they turn and atten a sheet in a booklet;

FIG. 1l presents a roller and its support and control mechanism that can be used with the structure in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 11A is a side view of the mechanism in FIG. l1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS With reference to FIGS. 1 and 2, when switch 13 is closed, AC power source 14 energizes motor 15 which drives shaft 18 through shaft 16 and reduction gear box 17. Collar 19 is keyed to shaft 18 and nut 20 is screwed on the shaft. Since the collar is attached to plate 21, the plate is rotated when motor 15 is energized.

Vacuum chamber plate 23 is fastened to the top of table 24, and gear 25 is fastened to llange 26 on the chamber plate. For clarity in illustration, the width of 23 in FIG. 1, has been enlarged slightly. The output of 4 vacuum source 27 is fed through hose 28 and the top of table 24 to recess 29 (FIGS. 2 and 5) in the chamber plate.

Vacuum stands 31 and 32 are located over holes 33 and 34 (FIG. 2), respectively, in rotating plate 21. Hollow arm 37 is supported by member 381 and has one end positioned in stand 31, while hollow arm 39 is supported by member 40 and has one end positioned in stand 32.

Vacuum head 42 is rotatably mounted on hollow arm 39 (FIGS. 2 and 4), while vacuum head 43 is rotatably mounted on arm 37. As represented by the cross section of head 42 and arm 39 in FIG. 4, the heads are rotatably mounted on the arms by means of bearings 47. Further, the arms contain holes 44 and slots 45, while the vacuum heads contain holes 46.

When motor 15 is energized, as plate 21 is rotated vacuum is applied through recess 29 (FIG. S), holes 33, 34, and stands 31, 32 to heads 42 and 43 during respective 30 degrees rotation of the plate.

A paper peeler 48 (FIGS. 1 and 10) is attached to each vacuum head and is supported on a bracket 49.

Bevel gear and pinion gear 56 are positioned on shaft 57, which is supported by bracket 58 on rotating plate 21. lPinion 56 rotates around gear 25, while bevel gear 59 engages 55 and is connected through shaft 60 to coupling unit 61. The shaft is supported by bracket 58. The coupling unit is also connected through shaft 62, which is supported on ymember 40, to gear 64. The latter gear drives gear 65, which is attached to head 42. Thus, when plate 21 is rotated vacuum head 42 revolves around its longitudinal axis.

Likewise, a pinion gear 66 (FIG. l) rotates around gear 25 and is located on shaft 67. The shaft is supported in bracket 68 connected to plate 21. Bevel gear 69 is also located on the shaft and engages bevel gear 70 (FIG. l). `Coupling unit 71 (FIG. 2) is connected between gears 70 and 72 by means of shafts 73 and 74, respectively. Shaft 74 is supported by member 38 and shaft 73 by a leg of bracket 68. Gear 72 drives gear 75 which is connected to vacuum head 43. This arrangement rotates the head around its longitudinal axis when plate 21 is rotated by motor 15- The mechanical arrangement for controlling brush 80 (FIG. 1) will now be described. The gear 25 engages gear 82 which is located on shaft 83. The shaft as well :as its bearings are mounted in housing 84 which is Supported on rotating plate 21 by means of bracket 85 (FIG. 3). Link 86 is connected to eccentric arm 87 positioned on shaft 83. The eccentric arm drives cam-rod 88 (FIGS. 1 and 6) which slides in brackets 90 mounted on member 91. The member in -turn is mounted on vacuum stand 32 and member 40, as represented in FIG. 1.

Hinge 94 in FIG. 6 is used to pivotably mount member 95 on the brackets 90. The brush 80 and cam-member 97 are positioned on 95, while cam-lift 96 is located near the end of cam-rod 88. Spring 98 is located between members 91 and 99, the latter member being connected to 95.

When plate 21 is rotated by shaft 18, gear 82 drives eccentric arm 87 and link 86 which moves cam-rod 88 to the left in FIG. 6. As cam-lift 96 is moved to the left, it rides on the cam surface of cam-member 97 moving brush 80 to the up position in FIG. 7. When the camlift is moved to the right on the cam surface under control of the eccentric arm, the spring returns the brush 80 to its down position represented in FIG. 6.

Brush 81 (FIG. l) is controlled by an arrangement substantially identical to the one just described. Gear 100 is supported on shaft 101 and engages gear 25 (FIGS. 1 to 3). Shaft 101 and its bearings are located in housing 102 (FIG. 2) which is supported on rotating plate 21 by means of bracket 103. Eccentric arm 104 is located on the shaft and drives cam-rod 105 (FIG. 1) through link 106. Brush 81 is positioned on rotatable member 107. When shaft 18 drives gear 25, a cam-lift (not shown) on the end of cam-rod 105 moves brush 81 up or down in the manner represented for brush 80 in FIGS. 7 and 6, respectively.

In a typical operation, vacuum table 110 (FIGS. 8 to is positioned in front of table 24 in FIG. 1. The output of vacuum source 111 is applied to table 110, and a booklet, whose sheets 112 are to be turned, is placed on the table. The hollow arms 37 and 39 are positioned so that slots 45 (FIG. 4) are directed toward sheets 112. The vacuum is vented through holes 44 and slots 45 in the arms and holes 46 in heads 42 and 43. Hence the maximum force of attraction is directed toward the sheets when they are held flat by Vacuum table 110.

Motor (FIG. 1) is then energized and shaft 18 rotates plate 21. Since vacuum head 42 is rotated with the plate, the head is rotated around the shaft in a plane that includes the longitudinal axis of arm 39. The head is also rotated around its longitudinal axis by means 0f the mechanical arrangement that includes gears 64 and 65; The linear speed of a point on head 42 as it revolves around the axis of 42 is substantially equal to its linear speed as it revolves around the longitudinal axis of shaft 18.

As plate 21 is rotated, vacuum stand 32 passes over recess 29 (FIG. 5) for approximately 30 degrees of the rotation. During this time interval, `vacuum is applied from source 27 through plates 23 and 21, and arm 39 to head 42. The vacuum is vented through holes 46 in the head. Shortly after vacuum is applied to head 42, it cngages a corner of the top sheet 112 of the booklet. The sheet is attracted to the head and is turned slightly, as illustrated in FIG. 8. At this point, cam-lift 96 is in the location shown in FIG. 7 and brush 80 is in the up position.

Arm 39 and head 42 continue to rotate and just after the head passes the center of the booklet, vacuum stand 32 passes recess 29. The Vacuum to the head is then turned off. Paper peeler 48 prevents the sheet from being Wrapped more than a selected distance around vacuum head 42 during the portion of the operation just described, and the position the sheet now occupies is represented in FIG. 9.

`Cam-lift 96 is now in the position shown in FIG. 6 so that the brush 80 is in its down position. In its down position, the brush engages the sheet 112 of the booklet that has just been turned. As the brush continues in its path, it sweeps the sheet, smoothing it out, as illustrated in FIG. 10. After being turned and smoothed out, the sheet is held flat by vacuum source 111. After the sheet has been attened, the brush is returned to its up position represented in FIG. 7.

It is noted that the vacuum to heads 42 and 43 is turned olf after each head passes the center of the booklet so that the head will not hold the sheet 112 any longer, otherwise it might be torn from the booklet. Again, brushes and 81 are not moved to their down position until after the sheet 112 being acted on by either vacuurn head 42 or 43 has been turned. If moved prematurely to the down position, a brush might damage a corner of the booklet or might start to turn the next sheet in the booklet.

With reference to FIG. 11, roller 115 is rotatably mounted on arm 116 by means of bearings 118. The arm is connected to rod 117. The roller is used in place of brush 80 in FIG. 1 and a similar roller is used in place of brush 81. Roller 115 is driven by eccentric arm 87 and link 86.

The operation of this embodiment is the same as the one described above, except that instead of brush 80 moving down to engage and smooth the sheet, roller 115 moves to the left of its position in FIG. 10, engages the sheet, and smooths it out.

Many modications and variations of the present invention are possible in the light of the above teachings. For example, an electro-mechanical shutter could vbe placed in recess 29 in FIG. 5 to control the point where vacuum is applied to heads 42 and 43. This would enable the invention to be used with booklets having sheets of varying lengths. Again, rollers 115 may be used to assist the vacuum heads in turning the sheets of the booklet. To understand this operation, assume that a booklet, that has one sheet that is longer than the others, is positioned on vacuum. table 110. The shorter sheets are positioned on the longer one. Assume further that the electromechanical shutter is positioned so that the Vacuum head will engage an edge of and turn the longer sheet. However, the vacuum may not be strong enough to turn the longer sheet and the shorter ones as a unit. Underthese conditions, the roller, which follows behind the head, will engage the back of the longer sheet and assist in the turning operation.

Since various modifications are contemplated, it is t0 be understood that within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specically described.

We claim:

1. An automatic sheet turner comprising:

a hollow vacuum head and an arm, each having a longitudinal axis,

said vacuum head containing a plurality of holes and being rotatably mounted on said arm,

means for rotating said arm in such a manner that its longitudinal axis is rotated in a selected plane, means for rotating said vacuum head around its longitudinal axis,

means for holding the sheets of a booklet in a substantially at position and for positioning said booklet so that the vacuum head engages the edge of each sheet in succession as it is rotated,

a source of vacuum having an output connected to said head,

means for applying the output of said source to said head during a time interval that starts prior to the time that the vacuum head engages the edge of a sheet of said booklet and extends to the time after said head passes the center of said booklet, whereby each sheet is attracted to said vacuum head and turned,

means including a rotatable member having a longitudinal axis for attening each sheet after it has been turned,

means for rotating said member in such a manner that its longitudinal axis is rotated in a selected plane,

means for moving said member from a rst to a second position, said member engaging a turning sheet of said booklet in said second position,

means for placing said member in said second position during a time interval that starts after the start of the turning operation of each sheet of said booklet, and

means for placing said member in said rst position during a time interval that starts after the member no longer engages said sheet.

2. The automatic sheet turner set forth in claim 1 wherein the means for flattening each sheet comprises a brush.

3. The automatic sheet turner set forth in claim 2 wherein the means for holding the sheets of said booklet comprises:

a member having a surface supporting said sheets,

a source of vacuum, and

means for applying the output of said last-mentioned source to said surface.

4. The automatic sheet turner set forth in claim 1 wherein the means for attening each sheet comprises:

a rotatable roller, and

means for rotating said roller.

5. The automatic sheet turner set forth in claim 4 wherein the means for holding the sheets comprises:

a member having a surface for supporting said sheets, a source of vacuum, and means for applying the output of said last-mentioned source to said surface. 6. The automatic sheet turner set. forth in claim 1 including:

means for preventing each sheet of said booklet from being wrapped more than a selected distance around said head when attracted to the head. 7. The automatic sheet turner set. forth in claim 1 wherein:

said arm is hollow and extends into said hollow vacuum head, said arm containing at least one slot and a plurality of holes, said head being positioned on said arm in such a manner that the slot is positioned closer to the sheets of said booklet than the holes in said arm when said vacuum head engages an edge of each sheet.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS ll/ 1943 Chapman.

5/1957 Hagman 40-104

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2334751 *Jan 18, 1940Nov 23, 1943Chapman George TDisplay device
US2791847 *May 18, 1953May 14, 1957Hagman Ernest FPage turner
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4102071 *Feb 16, 1977Jul 25, 1978Arcy James A DAutomatic page turning apparatus
US4432154 *Mar 8, 1982Feb 21, 1984Dejon CorporationPage manipulation apparatus in apparatus for automatically turning pages
US4663873 *Dec 20, 1985May 12, 1987Xerox CorporationPage flipper for book copying
US4673286 *Dec 20, 1985Jun 16, 1987Xerox CorporationFrictionless vacuum feeder for book copying
US4677778 *Oct 20, 1986Jul 7, 1987Canon Kabushiki KaishaSheet manipulating apparatus
US4693594 *Dec 20, 1985Sep 15, 1987Xerox CorporationPlaten transport and vacuum plenum for book copying
US4780977 *Sep 8, 1987Nov 1, 1988Maddak, Inc.Page turning apparatus
US4942482 *Jul 31, 1986Jul 17, 1990Sony CorporationAutomatic page-turning device
US5430969 *Dec 8, 1993Jul 11, 1995Taylor; DonFish hook and lure cover
US5612791 *Dec 12, 1995Mar 18, 1997Xerox CorporationBook imager
US5640252 *Dec 12, 1995Jun 17, 1997Xerox CorporationBound document imager with page turner
US6574014Sep 28, 2001Jun 3, 2003Xerox CorporationAutomatic book page turner for imaging
US6611362Sep 28, 2001Aug 26, 2003Xerox CorporationAutomatic book page turner for imaging
US7557965Sep 10, 2003Jul 7, 2009Kirtas Technologies, Inc.Automated page turning apparatus to assist in viewing pages of a document
US7595915 *Mar 14, 2003Sep 29, 2009Kirtas Technologies, Inc.Page turning apparatus with a vacuum plenum and an adaptive air fluffer
EP0212498A2 *Aug 8, 1986Mar 4, 1987Sony CorporationAutomatic page-turning device
EP0227396A1 *Dec 12, 1986Jul 1, 1987Xerox CorporationVacuum feeder for book copying
EP0779533A1Dec 11, 1996Jun 18, 1997Xerox CorporationBound document imager with air jet page turning system
EP0779534A1Dec 11, 1996Jun 18, 1997Xerox CorporationBound document imager with page turner
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/531
International ClassificationG03B27/62
Cooperative ClassificationG03B27/625
European ClassificationG03B27/62C4