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Publication numberUS3485338 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 23, 1969
Filing dateJun 7, 1967
Priority dateJun 7, 1967
Publication numberUS 3485338 A, US 3485338A, US-A-3485338, US3485338 A, US3485338A
InventorsWalter S Sterling
Original AssigneePneumatic Scale Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Closure handling and orienting apparatus
US 3485338 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 23, 1969 w. s. STERLING CLOSURE HANDLING AND ORIENTING APPARATUS 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 7, '1957 |NvENToR War/fer 5. Sfar/ing BY ATTORNEY Dec. 23, 1969 w. s. STERLING CLOSURE HANDLING AND ORIENTING APPARATUS 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June '7, 1967 'A mvENToR Wa/fer 5. Sfer//ng BY KM @LJ/2.4;@

ATTORNEY Dec. 23, 1969 w. s. STERLING CLOSURE HNDLING AND ORIENTING APPARATUS 6 Sheets-Sheet I5 Filed June '7, 1957 m. Rl om T6 mf WS l5.

B* @www ATTORNEY Dec. 23, 1969 w. s. STERLING 3,485,338

CLOSURE HANDLING AND ORIENTING APPARATUS INVENTOR WU/er .S Sfar/ing ATTORNEY Dec. 23, 1969 w. s. STERLING 3,485,338

CLOSURE HANDLING AND ORIENTING APPARATUS Filed June 7, 1957 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR Wa/er S. Ser//ng B* @MM ATTORNEY Dec. 23, 1969 w. s. STERLING 3,485,338

CLOSURE HANDLING AND ORIENTING APPARATUS i Filed June 7, 1967 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Fig. 7

IOO

Ffa. 5

INVENToR Wal/fer 5f Sfar/ing BY @Me/@Alf ATTORNEY ILS. Cl. 198-33 14 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Randomly arranged and relatively tall closures or like hollow articles open at one end are initially arranged horizontally one above the other in a chute `with their open ends facing in one or the other direction. Successive closures are guided between a pair of opposed rotary brushes in a position such that the closed end faces one `brush and the open end faces the opposing brush. In this position the bristles of one brush will enter the open end of a closure passing therebetween. A continuous stream of compressed air is directed downwardly between the continuously rotated brushes so that when the closure is released from between the brushes the closed end will be rocked downwardly by virtue of the open end being momentarily impeded in its movement by the bristles engaging the open end. As a result, successive closures passing between the rotary brushes are oriented with their open ends up.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention Description of the prior art In a commonly used type of closure handling machine, as shown in United States patent to W. S. Sterling, No. 2,715,978, dated Aug. 23, 1955, and assigned to the present assignee, randomly arranged closures are deposited on a continuously rotated inclined disk arranged to convey the closures into operative relation to orienting mechanism. The orienting mechanism includes a relatively small beveled rotary disk and a stationary rail cooperating with the disk. In operation, those closures which initially assume an oriented position between the `beveled disk and the rail will maintain their stability and will be moved into position to be deposited into a delivery chute. Those closures which assume a position other than an oriented position are rejected from the mechanism and returned to the carrier disk to be recirculated.

While the above described closure handling apparatus operates satisfactorily for many sizes and shapes of closures, the eliiciency of the apparatus is dependent on the positioning of the closures. In other words, the number of closures oriented per unit of time is variable because of the fact that the position of the closures conveyed to the orienting mechanism is indeterminate. In the operation of the present apparatus practically all of the closures delivered thereto are advanced to the orienting mechanism nited States Patent O ICC whereby a minimum of closures are rejected and returned to the carrier disk. Furthermore, the orienting mechanlsm forming the subject matter of the present invention 1s particularly adapted for orienting elongated closures wherein the height of the closure is substantially greater than the diameter thereof.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention relates generally to closure handling apparatus particularly adapted for orienting relatively tall closures, and inaccordance with the present invention the tall closures are iirst arranged in a line end to end, successive endmost closures being deposited in a chute with the closures disposed horizontally one above the other and with the open ends of the closures facing either to the right or left. Thereafter, successive closures are oriented to face with their open ends up as they pass between a pair of rotary orienting brushes and into a substantially vertical chute. Finally, successive individual open end up closures are transferred laterally to assume a substantially upright position in side by side relation with their open ends up in an inclined portion of the chute which may lead to the transfer mechanism of a bottle capping machine or the like.

Accordingly, the invention has for an object to provide novel and improved closure handling apparatus having novel provision for handling and orienting relatively tall closures in a simple, eiiicient and rapid manner.

The invention has for another object to provide novel and improved closure handling apparatus of the character specified having novel provision for transferring successive foremost closures in an end to end line whereby to provide a stack of closures arranged horizontally one above the other.

A further object of the invention is to provide novel and improved closure handling apparatus of the character specified which is characterized 'by novel provision for transferring individual closures from vertical portion of a chute laterally into an inclined portion of the chute whereby to provide a line of upright closures arranged side by side.

With these general objects in View and such others as may hereinafter appear, the invention consists in the Closure handling and orienting apparatus, and in the various structures, arrangements and combinations of parts hereinafter described and particularly defined in the claims at the end of this specification.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings illustrating the preferred embodiment of the invention:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of closure handling and orienting apparatus embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation of the same;

FIG. 3 is a front elevation of the closure handling and orienting apparatus shown in FIG. l;

FIG. 4 is a plan view detail of the mechanism for initially aligning the closures horizontally in the chute;

FIG. 5 is a side elevation detail of the mechanism shown in FIG. 4, some of the parts being shown in cross section;

FIG. 6 is a front elevation detail of the rotary orienting brushes and the drive therefor;

FIG. 7 is a side elevation detail of the orienting brushes and drive shown in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a plan view cross section taken on the line 8-8 of FIG. 7; and

FIG. 9 is a diagrammatic View of the air circuit for the pneumatic control mechanisms shown in FIGS. 4 and 5.

3 DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRE EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings, the present invention is shown as embodied in a closure handling machine of the type illustrated and described in the United States patent to Sterling, No. 2,715,978, which comprises in general a hopper in which a bulk supply of randomly arranged closures may be stored, and a rotary carrier indicated generally at 12 arranged at an inclined plane. The carrier 12 is arranged to advance the randomly disposed closures deposited at the lower end thereof upwardly into engagement lwith guide means indicated generally at 14 to form a line of closures 15. Successive closures arriving at the upper end of the inclined carrier 12 are guided into engagement with the beveled marginal edge of a rotary orienting disk 16 arranged in a substantially horizontal plane. In operation, as the closures 15 are advanced along the edge of the orienting disk 16 they leave the carrier 12 and are supported between the beveled edge and a cooperating stationary closure supporting rail 18. Those closures assuming a predetermined oriented position between the beveled edge and the stationary rail are advanced into the upper end of a feed chute for delivery to a closure applying or other machine.

In the illustrated embodiment of the invention the present apparatus is particularly adapted to handle tall or elongated closures and provision is made for causing successively randomly arranged closures 15 delivered to the beveled disk 16 to assume a horizontal position between the beveled edge of the disk 16 and the stationary rail 18 so that successive closures are carried around in end to end relationship through a circular path but without regard as to orientation of the open or closed ends of the closures. In general, the closure handling and orienting apparatus further includes pneumatic control mechanism indicated generally at 22, which eects transfer of successive closures into the chute 20 with their axes disposed in a horizontal plane; orienting mechanism comprising a pair of opposed brushes 24, 26 arranged to cause successive horizontal closures to assume a` position with their axes in a vertical plane and with their open ends up; and transfer mechanism indicated generally at 28 arranged to cause successive closures to move in a lateral direction to form a line of closures side by side with their open ends up for delivery to a closure applying machine.

Referring now to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 for a more detailed description of the closure handling and orienting apparatus, the elongated closures 15 carried upwardly by the rotary disk 12 pass under a top rail 30 to be advanced in a horizontal position between the beveled disk 16 and the supporting rail 18. As herein shown, a jet 32 supported on a stationary outer rail 34 is arranged to direct a con tinuous stream of compressed air radially inwardly to urge the closures under the rail onto the beveled edge of the disk 16. Any upstanding closure riding along the edge of the rail 30 and which comes under the inuence of the stream of air from jet 32 is caused to rock to a lying down position under the rail as shown in FIG. l. The top rail 30 assures that successive closures guided onto the beveled disk 16 assume a lying down position, and a curved rail 38 which cooperates with the beveled edge of the disk 16 is arranged to admit successive single closures which enter endwise or with their axes tangential to the radius of the disk 16. Those closures assuming a position other than a tangential position, that is, those assuming a crosswise position, are guided by the curved rail 38 to assume a position with their axes arranged tangential to the radius of the beveled disk 16.

The closures 15 thus guided end to end, and disposed between the beveled edge 16 and the rail 18, pass under a top rail 40 'which prevents upward displacement of the closures while being advanced to the chute 20. A second air jet 42 is positioned at a point immediately prior to the position where a closure passes under the top rail 40.

The purpose of this air jet is to dislodge a closure which might inadvertently rest on top of an underlying closure, such dislodged closure being returned to the carrier 12. In practice, the jet 42 is arranged to direct a continuous stream of air toward the area immediately above a closure supported between the disk 16 and the rail 18. The top rail 40 and also the rail 30 are extended from a circular rail 44 which is supported by radial bars 46 carried at the upper end of a central stationary supporting shaft 48.

When the leading closure of the line being advanced in a circular path arrives adjacent the chute 20, the pneumatically operated control mechanism 22 is arranged to rapidly advance the foremost closure in the line to separate it from the remainder of the line and to then effect rapid advance of the closure down into the chute 20 with its axis in a horizontal plane. As illustrated in FIGS. 4, 5 and 9, the pneumatic control mechanism 22 includes an air jet which is arranged to direct a continuous stream of air at an angle under a top plate 52 and in the direction of movement of the closures. The flow of air causes a Venturi effect to draw the foremost closure ahead of the line under the top plate and into the upper end of the chute. The leading end of the closure thus advanced into the upper end of the chute engages a leaf spring 54 which cooperates with an air jet 56 in communication `with a chamber 58 of a pressure responsive device. The pressure responsive device is arranged to open a normally closed air valve 60 whereby to release air to a jet 62 which in turn is arranged to direct a blast of air against the closure in the upper end of the chute to advance the same down into the angular portion 64 of the chute 20.

As herein illustrated, see FIG. 9, the chamber 58 of the pressure responsive device is connected to a regulated supply of air under pressure by an inlet pipe 66 leading from a supply pipe 68. The chamber 58 is also provided with an outlet pipe 70 which leads to the normally closed valve unit 60. The valve unit 60 is provided with an air inlet pipe 72 leading from the supply pipe 68 and is also provided with an outlet pipe 74 which leads to the air jet 62. In operation, the jet 56 is provided with a small discharge orice which cooperates with the leaf spring 54. Normally, the leaf spring 54 is spaced from the orifice and the construction of the control unit is such that a large pressure change occurs upon minute movement of the leaf spring toward the orice when the endmost closure engages the spring 54.

The valve 60 may be spring closed, and upon engagement of the endmost closure lwith the leaf spring, the pressure in the chamber 58 is increased to effect opening of the spring pressed valve 60 and release of air from the jet 62 to effect rapid advancement of the closure down into the angular portion 64 of the chute.

It will be understood that the closures are relatively light in weight, such as thin lightweight metal, so that normal advance of the line traveling at a relatively slow rate and in a circular path into the upper end of the chute would not be suflicient to trigger the pressure responsive device. Hence, the air projected from the jet 50 is arranged to rapidly advance the endmost closure so as to gain suicient momentum to move the leaf spring and effect operation of the pneumatic control mechanism 22 to advance the closure laterally down the chute 20 or at right angles to the line to form a stack thereof arranged side by side with their axes in a horizontal plane.

The line of contiguous end to end closures face with their open or closed ends forward and in operation, when the foremost closure in the line is drawn into the upper end of the chute 20 by the action of the jet 50 it comes to rest against the leaf spring 54 at which time a back pressure is created to prevent the remainder of the line from advancing until after the first closure is advanced down the chute by the air blast from the jet 62. When the foremost closure enters the upper end of the chute, it

engages a ledge 76 and is supported in alignment with side guides 78, 80, the ledge 76 preventing the closure from rolling down the chute in an uncontrolled manner, such as endwise instead of in a horizontal plane as required. An important reason for separating the foremost closure from the remainder of the line is that the contiguous ends of adjacent endwise closures might be frictionally engaged so as to interfere with the lateral separation of the closure from the line down into the chute; In practice, some of the closures adapted to be handled in the present orienting device may have irregular edges so that unless separation of successive foremost closures in the line is effected during the lateral movement, it is possible that frictional engagement of the ends of the fofemost closures might cause the foremost closure to rock` to enter between the guides 78, 80 in a longitudinal direction. `In practice, the end to end line of closures traveling'in a circular path are advanced relatively slowly, the disk 16 being rotated at a rate of about to 30 rpm.

From the description thus far, it will be seen that successive closures deposited in the chute 20 are stacked one above the other in a horizontalfposition between the guides 78, 80 in the inclined portion 64 of the chute 20. The stacked closures roll down the inclined 4portion 64 of the chute by gravity into a vertical portion 82 of the chute wherein the opposed brushes 24, l26 of the orienting mechanism are disposed. As shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, the brushes are supported on laterally spaced shafts S4, 86 journaled in suitable bearings formed in a chute supporting plate 88. The spaced guides 78, 80 maintain the closures in a horizontal `position and the yperiphery of the brushes extend a short distance into lthe sides of the chute in the path of the ends of the horizontally disposed closures as shown in FIG. 6.

The brushes 24, 26 are continuously rotated in opposite directions or toward each other through connections including intermeshing spur gears 90,' 92 fast on the shafts 84, 86; a chain and sprocket drive 94 connecting the shaft 84 to the output shaft 96 of a speed reducing unit 98. The input shaft 100 of the speed reducing unit is connected by a belt and pulley drive 102 to a motor 104. The drive unit is supported on a platen 106 carried by depending plates 10S attached to a bracket 110 forming a part of the frame of the machine as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

Successive horizontally disposed closures supported between the guide rails 78 and 80 enter between the brushes 24 and 26 to present their ends in `engagement with the bristles, the bristles of one brush entering the open end of a closure and the bristles of the opposing brush engaging the closed end serving to urge the closed end downwardly to enter between vertical guide rails 112, 114. The object of the brushes is to orient successive closures open end up between the vertical guide rails and in operation, when a closure assumes a position lbetween the brushes, as shown in FIG. 6, it comes under the influence of a stream of air being continuously projected from an angularly positioned jet 116 which may be connected by a supply pipe 118 to any usual or preferred source of regulated compressed air. In practice, the downwardly projected stream of air together with the rotation of the brushes effects advance of the closed end first by virtue of the bristles engaging and impeding the advance of the open end. In operation, the bristles squeezed into the open end and may actually support the closure to present the closed end downwardly, the closure then being released from the bristles by centrifugal force and by the influence of the air stream. In order to limit or reduce the pressure of the line of closures disposed above the orienting brushes 24, 26 for most eflicie'nt operation, a pair of pivoted fingers 115 supported by the chute 20 are arranged to bear against successive closures passing therethrough whereby to hold back or relieve a major portion of the weight of the line without impeding the progress of the closures therepast.

It will be observed that the spaced relationship of the brushes and the diameter thereof are related to the length of the closure being handled for most efficient operation. The brushes are arranged on fixed centers and are interchangeably clamped to their shafts by washers 117 and bolts 119. The washers 117 are of a diameter such as to leave a predetermined length of bristles extending beyond the periphery of the washers to accommodate a predetermined length of closure. In practice, when a different length of closure is to be handled, the guide rails may be adjusted and the brushes 24, 26 may be replaced by brushes of a different diameter to suit the new size closure. The washers 117 may also be replaced by thpse of a different diameter if necessary to change the extension of the bristles to accommodate the new size closure. In operation, the brush engaging the closed end of the closure tends to urge the open end of the closure into the bristles of the opposing brush.

Referring now to FIGS. 7 and 8, it will be seen that successive closures oriented into an open end up position by the brushes 24, 26 are caused to be transferred from the vertical Iportion 82 to a succeeding inclined portion 120 of the chute by the transfer mechanism 28. The transferred closures are aligned side by side in the inclined portion 120 of the chute. In operation, a closure released by the orienting brushes is rapidly advanced down the chute to engage a projecting ledge 122 at the bottom of the vertical portion of the chute, and the closure is then caused to rock clockwise, viewing FIG. 7, with the closed end in engagement with the bottom rail 124 of the inclined por-4 tion 120 of the chute. The closures thus aligned .in the inclined portion 120 of the chute are now fully oriented to be delivered by gravity to a closure applying machine or the like. The vertical portion 82 of the chute is defined by the supporting plate 88, top plate 64 and side guide rails 112, 114. In order to more accurately'guide the closure to cause the same to engage the ledge 122, a pair of corner guides 123 are provided as shown in FIGS. 7 and 8.

The transfer mechanism 28 is arranged to control the movement of the relatively lightweight closures to assure that successive closures enter the chute 120 in an open end up position and in a manner such as to prevent bouncing of the closure or to prevent passing of the closure into the inclined portion 120 in a lying down position.

As herein shown, in order to hold the closure down against the ledge 122 without bouncing, a pair of air jets 126, 128 leading from the supply pipe 118 are angularly arranged, as shown in FIG. 8, to emit streams of air past the lower end of the closure or immediately above the ledge 122 and through openings 130 in the supporting plate 88 to cause a Venturi effect whereby the lower end of a closure coming under the inuence of such streams of air will be held from bouncing. The closure thus controlled is free to rock forwardly down the inclined portion 120 of the chute under the impetus of its velocity down the vertical portion 82 of the chute.

Another important reason for advancing the closure at a rapid rate down the vertical portion 82 of the chute by the blast of air from the air jet 116 is to separate it from a succeeding closure and to maintain such separation until the closure advanced to the ledge 122 has rocked off the ledge and into the inclined portion 120 of the chute. It will be noted that top rail 132 of the portion 120 is curved outwardly as at 134 to provide clearance for rocking movement of the closure. It will be apparent that any accumulation of closures one upon another in the vertical portion 82 would interfere with the proper transfer of the closures from the vertical to the inclined portions of the chute; hence, the timing of advance of successive closures down the vertical portion 82 is such as to permit rocking of one closure off the ledge 122 before a succeeding closure is released to engage the ledge.

From the above description it will be seen that the present closure handling and orienting apparatus is particularly adapted for handling closures which are taller than their diameters and wherein provision is made for first aligning the closures end to end without regard for ,orientation of the open or closed ends; depositing successive closures from the line into a chute one above the other with their axes in a horizontal plane; then passing successive closures between relatively narrow rotary brushes arranged, with the assistance of an air stream, to orient the closures vertically open end up; and finally, successive vopen end up vertically arranged closures are transferred into an inclined portion of the chute in a side by side open end up position.

While the preferred embodiment of the invention has been herein illustrated and described, it will be understood that the invention may be embodied in other forms within the scope of the following claims.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed is:

1. In apparatus for orienting hollow closures open at one end, means for supporting closures one above the other with their axes disposed in a horizontal plane and with their open ends facing either right or left, a pair of spaced rotary brushes rotated in opposite directions associated with said supporting means and between which the ends of successive closures are guided, the bristles of one brush entering the open end of a closure during passage of the latter therebetween, means for projecting a stream of air against the closure passing between the brushes whereby to cause the closed end of the closure to rock downwardly while the bristles of said one brush momentarily impede movement of the open end, thus effecting orientation of successive closures open end up.

2.. Inzclosure handling and orienting apparatus, in combination, means for aligning and supporting randomly arranged closures end to end in a line without regard for orientation of the open or closed ends, a guide chute, means for depositing successive unoriented closures from the line into the chute one above the other with their axes in a horizontal plane, a pair of opposed rotary brushes disposed to engage the ends of successive closures passing through the chute, the bristles of one brush entering the open end of a closure during rotation of the brushes toward each other, and means for directing a stream of air againstthe closure passing between the brushes whereby to cause the closed end to face downwardly upon release ofthe closure, thus effecting orientation of successive closures with their open ends up.

3.l In closure handling and orienting apparatus, in cornbination, closure supporting means including means for supporting hollow closures open at one end one above the other in a vertical supporting portion with their axes disposed in a horizontal plane and with their open ends facing either right or left, means for orienting successive closures to assume an upright position in said vertical supporting portion with their open ends up, and means including an angularly inclined portion of said supporting means for transferring and guiding successive upright closures into isaid inclined portion to provide a line of oriented closures side by side with their open ends up, said last named means including means at the bottom of said vertical portion arranged to effect rocking of the closures from the vertical to the inclined portion of the supporting means.

4. In apparatus for orienting tall closures, means for supporting horizontally disposed closures one above the other with the open ends facing either right or left, a pair of spaced opposed rotary brushes associated with said supporting means and between which the ends of said closures are guided, the bristles of one brush entering the open end of a closure during passage therebetween, means for projecting a stream of air against the closure passing between the brushes whereby to move the closed end of the closure downwardly while the bristles momentarily impede the movement of the open end whereby to cause successive closures to leave the brushes open end up, and means for transferring and guiding successive upright closures laterally to provide a line of oriented closures side by side with their open ends up.

5. In closure orienting apparatus of the character described, as defined'in claim 4, which includes mountings for said brushes'adapted for interchanging brushes to accommodate closures of different proportions.

6. Apparatus for handling and orienting relatively lightweight hollow closuresopen at one end, in combination, means for aligning and advancing randomly arranged closures end to e`nd in a line without regard to orientation of the open orI closed ends, a guide chute, means for rapidly advancing" and depositing successive foremost unoriented closures 'fromthe line into the chute one above the other with their axes in a horizontal plane, and means for orienting successive closures to assume an upright position in said guide chute, said rapidly advancing and depositing means comp'r'ising means for creating a suction in the upper end of said chute to rapidly draw the foremost closure into the chute, a normally inoperative air jet for directing stream of air against the closure to project the same down the chute in a direction at right angles to the direction of movement of said line, and control means responsive to movement of successive closures drawn into the chute for operating said normally inoperative air jet.

7. Apparatus as defined in claim 6 wherein the control means includes a normally closed air valve operatively connected to a source 4fof compressed air and to said jet, and a pressure amplifying unit connected to said valve and operative to open the same upon an increase in pressure effected by a closure drawn into the chute and into operative engagement with said pressure amplifying unit.

8. Apparatus as defined in claim 6 wherein the upper end of the chute is' provided with a top plate, and wherein said suction creating means includes an air jet directing a stream of air at a downwardly inclined angle under said top plate to provide in effect a Venturi action.

9. In a closurewliandling machine of the character described, in combination, means for advancing elongated closures end to end in a line, a guide chute, and means for rapidly advancing and depositing successive foremost closures from the line into the chute one above the other with their axes in` a horizontal plane, said l-ast named means comprising Jmeans for creating a suction in the upper end of said chute to rapidly draw the foremost closure into the chute, a normally inactive air jet for directing a blast of air against the closure to project the same down the chute in a direction at right angles to the direction of movement of said end to end line, and control means responsive to movement of successive closures drawn into the chute for activating said normally inactive air jet.

10. In a closure handling machine of the character described, in combination, a guide chute having a substantially vertical portion and an angularly extended inclined portion, said substantially vertical portion supporting successive hollow closures oriented with their open ends up, and means for transferring successive oriented closures laterally from said vertical portion to said angularly eX- tended portion to present the open end up closures side by side in a line, said transferring means including a ledge disposed at the lower end of said vertical portion, a curved top plate providing clearance for successive closures to rock from the ledge into said lower angularly inclined portion, and pneumatic means crea-ting a holding action adjacent said ledge to prevent upward displacement of the closures from the ledge and to permit said rocking movement.

11. In closure handling and orienting apparatus, in combination, means for supporting closures one above the other with their axes in a horizontal plane including a guide chute having an inclined upper portion, a substantially vertical intermediate portion and an angularly eX- tended inclined lower portion, the closures in said upper portion having their open ends facing either right or left,

a pair of opposed rotary brushes associated with the vertical portion of said chute and between which the ends of said horizontal closures are guided, the bristles of one brush entering the open end of a closure during passage therebetween, means for directing a stream of air against the closure passing between the brushes to direct the closed end downwardly while the bristles momentarily impede the movement of the open end to cause successive closures to leave the brushes open end up1 and means for transferring `and guiding successive single oriented closures laterally from the vertical portion to said angularly eX- tended portion to present the open end up closures side by side in aline.

12. Apparatus as defined in claim 11 wherein the transfer means includes a ledge disposed at the lower end of said vertical portion, a curved top plate providing clearance for succesive closures to rock from the ledge into said lower angularly inclined portion, and pneumatic means creating a holding action adjacent said ledge to prevent upward displacement from the ledge yand to permit said rocking movement.

13. In a closure handling machine for orienting and feeding hollow closures open at one end, in combination, a guide chute supporting a stack of closures one above the other with their axes in a horizontal plane -and with their open ends facing indiscriminately to the right or left, and means for orienting successive closures in the chute comprising a pair of opposed rotary brushes engageable with the ends of successive closures, the engagement of the bristles of one brush with the open end of a closure causing the closure to move to a position with its open end facing upwardly when released by the brushes, and means for directing a stream of air between said brushes to assist in moving the closure into its oriented position.

14. In a closure handling machine for orienting and feeding hollow closures open at one end, in combination, means for aligning and advancing a group of randomly arranged closures to form a line thereof end to end without regard to orientation of the open or closed ends, a guide chute, means for depositing successive closures from the line into the chute one above the other with their axes in a horizontal plane, a pair of opposed rotary brushes disposed to engage the ends of successive closures passing through the chute, the bristles of one brush entering the open end of a closure during rotation of the `brushes toward each other, means for directing a stream vof air against the closure passing between the brushes to direct the closed end downwardly while the bristles momentarily impede the movement of the open end whereby to cause successive closures to leave the rbrushes open end up, and means for transferring and guiding successive upright closures laterally to provide aine of oriented closures side by side with their open ends up.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,425,374 8/1922 Elgy 198-33 1,669,087 5/1928 Hungerford 198-33 3,089,732 5/1963 Gamberini 302-2 3,123,198 3/1964 vHohl 198-33 2,169,833 8/1939 Conley 193--43 EDWARD A. SROKA, Primary Examiner Us. c1. XR, 193-43

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1425374 *Jul 31, 1920Aug 8, 1922Elgy Valentine C HApparatus for sorting out and delivering bodies or lids of tins or the like
US1669087 *Oct 29, 1923May 8, 1928Warren H HungerfordBiscuit-facing machine
US2169833 *Jul 13, 1938Aug 15, 1939Thermal Res CorpCan-turning apparatus
US3089732 *Jul 31, 1959May 14, 1963American Mach & FoundryMethod and apparatus for handling articles
US3123198 *Aug 7, 1959Mar 3, 1964 Closure cap orienting apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3942733 *Mar 21, 1973Mar 9, 1976Fried. Krupp Gesellschaft Mit Beschrankter HaftungDevice for removing full bobbins on open-end spinning machines
US4828100 *Mar 5, 1986May 9, 1989Hoppmann CorporationRotating ring orienting feeder
CN102173343A *Nov 30, 2010Sep 7, 2011山东丽鹏股份有限公司Toothed ring double-outlet classifier
EP0283527A1 *Mar 20, 1987Sep 28, 1988Hoppmann CorporationRotating ring orienting feeder
WO2008041172A1 *Oct 1, 2007Apr 10, 2008Simoni S R LArticle unscrambling device
Classifications
U.S. Classification198/396, 198/624, 198/400, 193/44
International ClassificationB65G47/14, B67B3/064
Cooperative ClassificationB67B3/0645, B65G47/14
European ClassificationB65G47/14, B67B3/064B