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Publication numberUS3487800 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 6, 1970
Filing dateMar 27, 1968
Priority dateMar 27, 1968
Also published asDE1914604A1, DE1914604B2, DE1914604C3
Publication numberUS 3487800 A, US 3487800A, US-A-3487800, US3487800 A, US3487800A
InventorsDrake James, Schweitzer Hoyle
Original AssigneeSchweitzer Hoyle, Drake James
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wind-propelled apparatus
US 3487800 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent O 3,487,800 WIND-PROPELLED APPARATUS Hoyle Schweitzer, 317 Beirut, Pacific Palisades, Calif. 90272, and `Iames Drake, 38S Mesa, Santa Monica, Calif. 90402 Filed Mar. 27, 1968, Ser. No. 716,547 Int. Cl. B63b 15/02; B63h 9/10 U.S. Cl. 114-39 14 Claims ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE Wind-propelled apparatus in which a mast is universally mounted on a craft and supports a boom and sail. Specifically a pair of curved booms are arcuately connected athwart the mast and secure the sail therebetween, the position of the mast and sail being controllable by the user but being substantially free from pivotal restraint in the absence of such control.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention The field of art to which the invention pertains includes the lield of ships, particularly sailboats and iceboats, and the eld of land vehicle sail attachments.

Description of the prior art Sail propulsion has been -suggested as a motive means not only for boats and iceboats, but also for such watercraft as surfboards and landcraft such as skateboards and sleds, i.e., generally any lightweight small craft. Typically, a sail is provided on a mast that is rigidly secured to the craft in a vertical position or else the sail and mast are entwined in a network of riggings and control mechanisms.

The general effect of providing a sail on a normally sailfree vehicle is to convert the vehicle into a water or landboat. Thus, by rigidly securing a sail to a Surfboard, the feel of the surfboard and enjoyment as such is lost and the skill normally required to control it is no longer needed. Instead, one obtains the speed and feel of a light sailboat and needs substantially only those skills appropriate to control a sailboat. The same denaturing occurs with other vehicles modied to bear a sail.

A further problem arises when a sail is fitted to a vehicle that does not have high roll stability in that sudden or excessive winds can overturn the vehicle.

A need therefore exists for safely providing windpropulsion means for a vehicle not normally so equipped but which means preserves the original ride and control characteristics of the vehicle.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides wind propulsion means for a vehicle that adds new dimensions of wind responsiveness and speed and yet enhances the vehicles normal ride and control characteristics to greatly increase the enjoyment obtained therefrom. Wind-propelled apparatus is provided comprising vehicle body means adapted to support a user and wind-propulsion means pivotally associated with the body means and adapted to receive wind for motive power. The position of the propulsion means is controllable by the user and is substantially free from pivotal restraint in the absence of such control.

In particular embodiments, the propulsion means is connected to the vehicle body by means of a universal ICC joint, e.g. a joint having three axes of rotation, or other such joint to enable the propulsion means to be substantially free-floating in the absence of user control.

The wind propulsion means can comprise a spar pivotally attached to the vehicle body and a sail on the spar. Means are provided to allow the user to grasp the sail on one or both sides thereof. Thus, a boom is provided laterally disposed on the spar to hold the sail taut and provide a hand-hold. In particular embodiments, a pair of booms is provided arcuately connected athwart the spar and securing the sail therebetween.

The invention can be used on watercraft, iceboats and landcraft. It can be used on small yachts, runabouts, canoes, rowboats, and other such craft,l but is most advantageously used on small and lightweight vehicles such as surfboards, iceboats, skateboards, and sleds. Leeboard means can be provided for a watercraft of low roll stability such as a Surfboard. The term leeboard is meant to include center boards and dagger-boards, as these terms are known to the sailing art, as well as other projections from the body of the craft, planar or otherwise extending into or onto the water for stabilization.

The present invention allows essentially all of the steering and control to be accomplished through the sail; i.e. no rudder or other steering mechanism is needed, although such need not be excluded. One may accelerate, turn and tack merely by manipulating the sail. However, because the sail is pivotally unrestrained, it must be held by the user with the user relying on his skill with the vehicle for balance. In the event of sudden or excessive winds, the user need only release the sail and it will immediately fall in any direction, freeing the vehicle from the propulsive force.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIGURE l is a perspective View of a wind-propelled apparatus according to an embodiment of this invention obtained by modifying a Surfboard with a sail, spar and boom therefor and leeboard;

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view, on line 2-2 of FIG- URE 1, of a universal joint used for pivotal motion of the sail;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view, on line 3-3 of FIG- URE 1, of the spar-side juncture between the booms; and

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view, on line 4-4 of FIG- URE l, of the clew-side juncture between the booms.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to FIGURE 1, a wind-propelled apparatus is shown, including a Surfboard 10, spar 12, triangular sail 14 and booms 16 and 18. The Surfboard 10 has a daggerboard 20, as leeboard, inserted through an opening 22 provided in the body of the Surfboard 10 and projecting obliquely from the bottom 24 thereof. A top portion of the daggerboard 20 extends somewhat beyond the top surface 28 of the Surfboard 10 to provide a platform 29 for pivotal attachment of the spar 12 as will be fully described below.

The spar 12 is a stout, rounded, elongated fiberglass shaft which, in this case, is hollow for lightneses but may be of solid wood or metal, and has a cylindrical wood base 27 wedged through its lower end. The spar 12 serves as a pivotal mast for the sail 14 and is inserted within a hem 30 tapering along a long edge 311 of the sail 14 toward the top thereof. The bottom of the sail 14 is secured to the spar 12 by a rope 32 threaded through an eyelet 34 in a lower edge of the sail 14 adjacent to the spar 12.

Referring to FIGURE 2, the spar 12 is connected to the daggerboard platform 29 by means of a three-axis universal joint 36. The joint 36 is made completely of stainless steel and is attached to the spar 12 by means of brace plates 38 and 40 held on opposite sides of the spar base 27 by wood screws 37. The brace plates 38 and 40 have extended portions 42 and 44, respectively, somewhat below the spar base 27 and disposed on opposite sides of a short section of stainless steel tubing 46. A one-quarter inch diameter headed pin 48 extends through holes 50 and 52 in the brace plate extensions 42 and 44 and is rotatably secured by a cotter pin 54 inserted through a cotterway 56 in the headed pin 48.

A U-shaped clevis 58 of stainless steel sheeting is disposed on the tubing 46 so that its sides 60 (only one of which is shown) lie below and transverse to the brace plate extensions 42 and 44. A 1t-inch diameter headed pin 62 (shown in cross-section in FIGURE 2) extends through holes 64 in the clevis sides and in the tubing 46 and is rotatably secured by a cotter pin (not shown) through a cotterway in the headed pin 62.

A three-inch long, 1t-inch diameter round head machine screw 68 rotatably secures the clevis to the daggerboard 20 by extending through a hole 70 in the base 71 of the clevis 58 and from there through a washer 72 and underlying nut 74 and locknut 76 set in a mortise 78 in the daggerboard platform 29. The machine screw 68 holds the base of the clevis 58 with sufficient play to allow sliding rotation of the clevis 58 against the washer 72.

Referring to FIGURES l and 3, a pair of curved, laminated wood booms 16 and 18 are provided about four feet from the surface 28 of the Surfboard 10 and are arcuately connected at both their ends. At the sparend, the booms are connected together and to the spar 12 by a loop of one-inch wide webbed tape 80 encircling the spar 12 through a crescent-shaped opening `82 in the sail hem 30. The tape loop 80 has brass rings 84 at its ends held in place by stitches l86 through the looped tape and which secure the tape 80 to the booms 16 and 18 by engagement with brass hook ttings 88 secured to the booms 16 and 18 by wood screws 90. The booms 16 and 18 thus provide a handhold for the sail 14 spaced upwardly from at least an intermediate point on the lower edge of the sail.

Referring to FIGURES l and 4, the booms 16 and 18 are provided at their clew ends with outhaul openings 92 and 94, respectively, and jamb cleats 96 and 98, respectively, which are secured to the booms 16 and 18 by screws 99. An outhaul 100 is threaded from the jamb cleat 98 of one boom 18 through the outhaul opening 94 in that boom 18, through a reinforced opening 102 in the sail clew 104, through the outhaul opening 92 in the second boom 16, looped through both outhaul openings 94 and 92 and from there to a second jamb cleat 96 on the other boom 16. The outhaul 100 is then pulled taut and secured by the second jamb cleat 96 to hold the sail 14 taut between the booms 16 and 18.

In operation, the user stands on the top 28 of the Surfboard behind the point where the spar 12 is attached by the universal joint 36 and grips one or the other of the booms 16 or 18. If he were going before the wind and wished to make a turn, he would tilt the sail 14 forward, thus applying the force of the wind to the nose of the Surfboard 10 and causing the board 10 to turn to the left or right depending on which side of the sail 14 was Windward. On the other hand, if he wanted to come about into the wind for the purpose of tacking, he would pull the sail 14 backwardly to apply the force of the wind to the rear of the board 10, causing the rear of the board 10 to move so as to come into the wind. As he is into the wind, he may complete the tack by merely walking in front of the sail 14, grasping the boom on the other side and setting the sail 14 so that the wind captures it and the board 10 is then on its new course. The sail may be maneuvered forward and backward for speed control.

In the event that a sudden surge of wind threatens to capsize the Surfboard 10, the user may merely release the sail 14 and it will fall free into the water, completely removing the danger. The sail 14 is provided at its spar 12 end with a rope 106 so that the user can readily pull the sail 14 back into sailing position.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be effected to adapt the foregoing apparatus for the expediencies of particular applications without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. Wind-propelled apparatus comprising body means adapted to support a user and wind-propulsion means pivotally associated with said body means and adapted to receive wind for motive power for said apparatus, said propulsion means comprising a mast, a joint for mounting said mast on said body means, a sail and means for extending said sail laterally from said mast, the position of said propulsion means being controllable by said user, said propulsion means being substantially free from pivotal restraint in the absence of said user, said joint having a plurality of axes of rotation whereby said sail free falls along any of a plurality of vertical planes upon release by said user.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said propulsion means is adapted to be hand-held by said user but is otherwise substantially free from pivotal restraint.

3. The apparatus of claim 1 including means for said user to hold said sail.

4. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said sail extending means comprises a boom laterally disposed on said mast to hold said sail taut and adapted to provide a handhold for said user.

5. The apparatus of claim 1 including means adapted to enable said user to grasp either side of said sail.

6. The apparatus of claim 1 adapted as a watercraft.

7. The apparatus of claim 6 including water stabilizing means associated with said body means.

8. The apparatus of claim 6 including leeboard means associated with said body means.

9. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said propulsion means is substantially the sole means for changing the direction of travel of said apparatus.

10. Sail means for propelling a vehicle comprising a spar for a sail, hand-hold means associated therewith comprising a pair of curved booms arcuately connected athwart said spar for securing a sail therebetween, and means for attaching said spar to a vehicle in pivotal association therewith.

11. Wind-propelled apparatus comprising body means adapted to support a user, wind-propulsion means pivotally associated with said body means and adapted to receive wind for motive power for said apparatus, said propulsion means comprising a spar attached to said body in said pivotal association and a sail thereon, and a pair of curved booms arcuately connected .athwart said spar and securing said sail therebetween, the position of said propulsion means being controllable by said user, said propulsion means being substantially free from pivotal restraint in the absence of said control.

12. The sail means of claim 10 including a sail on said spar and secured between said booms.

13. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said sail has a lower edge extending outwardly from said spar, and including means spaced upwardly from at least an intermediate point on said lower edge for providing a handhold for said sail.

14. Wind-propelled apparatus comprising body means adapted to support a user and wind-propulsion means pivotally associated with said body means and adapted t0 receive Wind fO motive power for said apparatus,

said propulsion means comprising a mast, boom and sail laterally extended from said mast, a joint for mounting said mast on said body means, the position of said propulsion means being controllable by said user, said propulsion means being substantially free from pivotal restraint in the absence of said user, said joint having a plurality of axes of rotation whereby said sail free falls along any of a plurality of vertical planes upon release by said user.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,353,007 7/1944 Blackman 114-91 3,141,435 7/1964 Moitt 114-90 TRYGVE M. BLIX, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2353007 *Oct 8, 1940Jul 4, 1944Blackman Edward LSailing vessel
US3141435 *Oct 2, 1962Jul 21, 1964Jr Merritt L MoffittSailing catamaran
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3656444 *Jun 3, 1970Apr 18, 1972Kratz Kenneth ESailboat rigging
US3982766 *Sep 29, 1975Sep 28, 1976Budge James DWind-propelled skateboard
US3996868 *May 14, 1975Dec 14, 1976Fa. Immobilien Commerce Estbl. Dr. Ivo BeckWindsurfer
US4037553 *Oct 15, 1975Jul 26, 1977Hannes MarkerApparatus for connecting a sailing mast to a sailing board
US4054100 *Oct 8, 1976Oct 18, 1977R. Lynn RinemanSport sailboat
US4073254 *Jul 2, 1976Feb 14, 1978Hannes MarkerSailing mast for sailing boards
US4094262 *Mar 25, 1977Jun 13, 1978Tilo RiedelIcecraft
US4149482 *Oct 13, 1977Apr 17, 1979Hoyt John GAerodynamic mainsail and furling device
US4166425 *Aug 5, 1977Sep 4, 1979Kummetz Hans EElastic connection assembly for the mast of a sailboat
US4204694 *Jun 22, 1978May 27, 1980Freeman John LSail apparatus for a land vehicle
US4236476 *Dec 23, 1977Dec 2, 1980Alexander SolfArticulate mast footing arrangement, in particular for wind surfboards
US4253209 *Jan 10, 1977Mar 3, 1981Patrick CarnSail boards
US4276844 *Jun 18, 1979Jul 7, 1981Kransco Manufacturing, Inc.Soft sailboard
US4334488 *Jan 8, 1980Jun 15, 1982Christiane JolivetFixture for attaching the wishbone to the mast of a sail-board
US4365570 *Sep 21, 1981Dec 28, 1982Jamieson Robert SSail system for sailboards
US4401047 *Jan 19, 1981Aug 30, 1983Auras Alain GWind-propelled craft
US4418631 *Oct 26, 1981Dec 6, 1983Frohbach Louis AApparatus for controlling a wind propelled sailing device
US4465010 *Apr 9, 1982Aug 14, 1984Jalbert Domina CSail and method of construction
US4489957 *Nov 7, 1980Dec 25, 1984Klas HolmgrenTool for sailing with skates etc.
US4501214 *May 16, 1983Feb 26, 1985Meyer Urs PMast for a sail
US4508046 *Feb 8, 1984Apr 2, 1985Michael P. ShannonWind surfing hydrofoil apparatus
US4537145 *Mar 7, 1984Aug 27, 1985White Christopher RWind propelled vessel
US4541355 *Dec 26, 1984Sep 17, 1985Denton James BSail rigging
US4610212 *Oct 11, 1985Sep 9, 1986Petrovich Enrique GFast self righting catamaran
US4628853 *May 31, 1985Dec 16, 1986Hoyt John GRecreational watercraft
US4679516 *Mar 7, 1986Jul 14, 1987Friesen Terry VSailboard assembly having a limited diplacement mast
US4706590 *Oct 29, 1986Nov 17, 1987Hoyt John GDeck mounted lateral mast rake adjuster
US4771723 *Jul 13, 1987Sep 20, 1988Friesen Terry VSailboard assembly having a foot-operable steering assembly
US4799443 *Dec 19, 1986Jan 24, 1989Vogel Ferdinand LSwing sail boat
US4922845 *Feb 29, 1988May 8, 1990PdiBoom for a sailing device
US5042412 *Aug 17, 1990Aug 27, 1991Brent FouchWindsurfer sail and mast righting device and method
US5060590 *Apr 6, 1990Oct 29, 1991Springall Oliver MSailing apparatus
US5076185 *Dec 18, 1989Dec 31, 1991Tarng Min MTangs cycleboard
US5826530 *Aug 19, 1994Oct 27, 1998Oy Skywings AbWing sail
US7793604 *May 31, 2002Sep 14, 2010Keller John HPlaning sailboard
DE2601690A1 *Jan 19, 1976Jul 21, 1977Tilo RiedelCentre board for wind surfers surfing board - has rounded board section tiltable within well area by movement of foot actuated plate
DE2612984A1 *Mar 26, 1976Sep 29, 1977Tilo Dipl Ing RiedelEis-stehsegler
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Classifications
U.S. Classification114/39.15, 114/91
International ClassificationB63B35/73, B63B35/79
Cooperative ClassificationB63B35/7953, B63B35/7959
European ClassificationB63B35/79W2, B63B35/79W
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 17, 1983PSPatent suit(s) filed
Oct 19, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: WINDSURFING INTERNATIONAL,INC.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:WINDSURFING INTERNATIONAL;REEL/FRAME:004055/0768
Effective date: 19820831
Oct 19, 1982AS01Change of name
Owner name: WINDSURFING INTERNATIONAL
Owner name: WINDSURFING INTERNATIONAL,INC.
Effective date: 19820831
Sep 30, 1981AS99Other assignments
Free format text: WINDSURFING INTERNATIONAL * SCHWEITZER, HOYLE : 19810902 OTHER CASES: NONE; RE-RECORD TO CORRECT NAME OF ASSIGNEE ON REEL 3157- FRAME 80
Sep 30, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: WINDSURFING INTERNATIONAL
Free format text: RE-RECORD TO CORRECT NAME OF ASSIGNEE ON REEL 3157- FRAME 805-806;ASSIGNOR:SCHWEITZER, HOYLE;REEL/FRAME:003915/0708
Effective date: 19810902
Owner name: WINDSURFING INTERNATIONAL, STATELESS
Free format text: RE-RECORD TO CORRECT NAME OF ASSIGNEE;ASSIGNOR:SCHWEITZER, HOYLE;REEL/FRAME:003915/0708