Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3487840 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 6, 1970
Filing dateMay 22, 1967
Priority dateMay 22, 1967
Publication numberUS 3487840 A, US 3487840A, US-A-3487840, US3487840 A, US3487840A
InventorsOnan Colin L, Stenzel Wallace I
Original AssigneeWaukee Eng Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for cleaning articles
US 3487840 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F APPARATUS FOR CLEANING ARTICLES Filed May 22. 1967 .5 smww shwa 1 Emmi W, H, @T 11 11 APPARATUS FOR CLEANING ARTICLES 5 swam-shew m Filed May 22, 1967 mvo 1% w. 11. STENZL APPARATUS FOR CLEANING ARTICLES .5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed May 22, 1967 INVENTOJRS wwdamm .2. firmvxm Cal. [N m.

ONWA/ APPARATUS FOR CLEANING ARTICLES Filed May 22, 1967 SSheets-Sheet 4 M Q5 i I r I f I a4 A i P 63 l I] [32 ii AW Q 6::

W m M U0 /2/ M I W l' i i a l' I! 42 o F iii. a 1 i 9a a a 75 LWAM r V A TTOEWE Y5 11mm. mm a, s'mmzm E? m.

APPARATUS FOR CLEANING ARTICLES Filed May 2'3, 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 /nJML/J ATTOENEV United States Fatent Gffice 3,487,840 Patented Jan. 6, 19709 APPARATUS FOR CLEANING ARTICLES Wallace ll. Stenzel, Thiensville, and Colin L. Onan,

Mequon, Wis., assignors to Waukee Engineering (30., Milwaukee, Wis., a corporation of Wisconsin Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 394,925,

Sept. 8, 1964. This application May 22, 1967, Ser.

Int. (3]. B08!) 3/06 US. Cl. 134-112 12 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The invention relates to an apparatus for cleaning small machine parts and includes a washing chamber mounted above a tank containing a washing solution. A track extends into the washing chamber, and a rotatable container or drum containing the parts to be cleaned is mounted for movement on the track. To rotate the drum within the washing chamber, a drive unit is located within the chamber and includes a clutch member adapted to be engaged by a complementary clutch member on the drum as the drum is moved into the washing chamber. As the drum rotates, a cleaning solution is discharged from a series of jets located around the periphery of the washing chamber and the pressurized streams of cleaning solution pass through the perforated wall of the drum to clean the parts therein.

This application is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 394,925 filed Sept. 8, 1964, now abandoned and entitled Washer-Tumbler.

During fabrication, small machine parts are contaminated with surface adherent foreign material which must be removed. For example, machine parts which have been fabricated by cutting or pressing operations contain films of lubricants or coolants, while machine parts which have been fabricated by casting or molding may bear some of the material used in making the mold or material employed for expediting the release of the parts from the mold, or molded or casted parts may contain burrs or flash.

Prior art cleaning methods have not been completely satisfactory in removing the foreign material from the surface of small machine parts and this is particularly true where the parts have recesses or undercut portions or other inaccessible areas. Even when hot cleaning solutions have been used with agitation or with the parts being tumbled in the solution, it has been difiicult to remove all surface adherent foreign materials, particularly when such materials are located in recesses or undercuts. Another attempted solution in the past has been to subject the parts to high pressure jets while the parts are located in a metal basket or tote box. However, even when jets of high pressure washing solution have been employed,

many of the parts, and some areas of all parts, have not been exposed directly to the jets and have not been adequately cleaned.

The present invention is directed to an improved apparatus for cleaning surface adherent materials from small articles, such as machine parts. The apparatus includes a washing chamber which is mounted above a tank containing the cleaning solution. A track extends within the washing chamber and a rotatable drum or container containing the machine parts to be cleaned is mounted for movement on the track. To rotate the drum within the washing chamber, a drive unit is located within the chamber and includes a clutch member which is engageable with a complementary clutch member on the drum when the drum is moved into the washing chamber. As

the drum is rotated, the cleaning solution is pumped from the tank and is discharged from a series of nozzles within the washing chamber in the form of pressurized jets, and the jets or cleaning solution pass through the perforated wall of the drum and into contact with the tumbling machine parts.

The tumbling action provided by the rotating drum moves the machine parts relative to each other and relative to the container so that rubbing or abrasion of the parts on one another tends to break off or wear away flash and burrs. To provide this tumbling action and prevent slipping of the parts along the rotatingdrum wall, a series of battles are employed in the drum to provide the desired tumbling action.

The tumbling action is amplified and promoted by the many moderate pressure jets of cleaning solution which impinge on the machine parts from all directions. The jets of cleaning solution act on all parts, and on all surfaces of the parts, as the parts are tumbled within the drum. The jets of cleaning solution, by impinging against the parts, force the parts to assume positions other than those due to the tumbling action alone, and both the cleaning and the tumbling action are thus enhanced.

The drive unit for rotating the drum is permanently located within the washing chamber. When the drum is moved into the washing chamber, a clutch member associated with the drum automatically engages a corresponding clutch member of the drive mechanism to rotate the drum about its axis and provide the necessary tumbling action for the machine parts.

In one form of the invention the washing chamber is provided with a single opening and the drum is moved into, and out of, the chamber through the single opening. Alternately, the washing chamber can be provided with a pair of aligned openings so that the drum can be moved through the washing chamber in a straight-through flow path. In either case, the openings in the washing chamber are enclosed by doors so that the cleaning solution is dis charged without external splashing.

Other objects and advantages will appear in the course of the following description:

The drawings illustrate the best mode presently contemplated of carrying out the invention.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a washer into which a container full of parts is moved for subjecting the parts in the container to a tumbling action and to plural jets of cleaning solution directed toward and into the tumblercontainer from the sides of the washing chamber.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a base frame and a tumbler-container rotatably mounted thereon.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged cross section of the washing chamber and the tumblencontainer on the plane of line 3--3 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged longitudinal view partially in cross section and showing the tumbler-container positioned within the washing chamber.

FIG. 5 is an end elevation of a portion of the washer showing one externally mounted means for rotating the container.

FIG. 6 is a fragment of the container in axial section to show movable partitions for keeping separate relatively small quantities of different parts being cleaned at the same time.

FIG. 7 is a fragment of the washing chamber and the tumbler-container in longitudinal cross section showing piping and nozzles combined with a driving means, for internal jetting of the parts in the container.

FIG. 8 is a cross section taken on the plane 8--8 of FIG. 9.

FIG. 9 is a side view of a container made to receive a removable carrier for parts.

FIG. is a partial side elevation of .a tumbler-container with impulse type hydraulic turbine buckets thereon;

FIG. 11 is a diagrammatic end view of the container of FIG. 9, indicating the position and direction of various jets for rotating the tumbler-container.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of a modified form of the cleaning apparatus of the invention.

FIG. 13 is a longitudinal section of the apparatus of FIG. 12 showing the drum in the Washing chamber.

FIG. 14 is a section taken along line 1414 of FIG. 12 showing the drive mechanism connected to the drum.

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary plan view showing the swivel track section; and

FIG. 16 is an enlarged fragmentary end view of the drum-supporting track and showing the drum cradle locking mechanism.

Referring to FIGS. 11l, 15 generally designates a tank with access doors 16, for receiving a cleaning solution. A Washing chamber 17 extends upwardly from the tank 15 and drains thereinto and may be closed at one end and provided with a door 18 for closure of the other end. The

floor of the washing chamber 17 is formed by a series of spaced rollers 19 rotatable in a frame 20 on which a tumbler-container or drum can be pushed into and pulled out of the chamber 17. The longitudinal edges of the frame 20 extend above the upper surfaces of the rollers 19 to provide side surfaces for guiding movement of the tumbler-container. The rollers 19 and frame 20 extend outwardly of the chamber 17 for a distance for loading one or more drums while'the washing chamber is in use. The portion of rollers 19 and frame 20 extending outwardly of chamber 17 is supported on a framework 23 having a floor 24 on which is mounted an electric motor 25 and pump unit 26. The intake of pump 26 is connected with the tank 15 at 27. The pump discharge 28 connects with piping leading to manifolds, piping and nozzles located in chamber 17. The washer floor 24 also supports a centrifugal blower and its drive 29 for sup plying a gaseous combustible mixture to a burner 30 from which the products of combustion are taken through the tank 15 to heat the cleaning solution. Any other heating means may, of course, be used to heat the cleaning solution.

Referring to FIG. 3, it will be seen that the pump discharge pipe 28 is connected with side manifolds 34 and 35, top manifold 36 and bottom manifold 37 in the washing chamber 17. Each of the manifolds has a plurality of pipes 38 extending therefrom in substantially parallel relation longitudinally of the chamber, and each of the pipes is provided with a plurality of spaced nozzles 39. The nozzles 39 from the pipes extending along the sides and top of the washing chamber are preferably directed to provide jets substantially radial or normal to the axis of the drum to be positioned within the washing chamber 17 and at substantially uniform spacing along the length of the chamber, while the nozzles 39 from the pipes at the bottom of the Washing chamber are directed to jet between the rollers 19 and also substantially radially to the axis of the drum. Thus, many small jets are directed toward the drum from all directions.

The drum or container 47 to contain the machine parts to be cleaned includes a base frame 43 of generally rectangular shape which is provided with vertical rollers 44 at the corners thereof for bearing against the sides of the washing chamber roller frame 20 to thereby guide the base into and out of the chamber. Mounted adjacent each corner of the base 43 is a pair of brackets 45 and a horizontal roller 46 is journaled within each pair of brackets 45. The four rollers 46 form a cradle to support the drum 47 for rotation.

While the drum or container 47 is shown as cylindrical in shape, it can have any desired configuration. Circumferential guide tracks 48 are mounted on the outer surface of the drum, and the rollers 46 at each end of the base 43 are adapted to ride within the corresponding guide tracks 48 to thereby guide the drum in rotation about its axis. Pivotal latches 49 are connected to the roller frame 20 and can be pivoted manually into position behind the base frame 43 to prevent longitudinal movement of the base frame in the washing chamber.

The drum or container 47 is provided with a perforated cylindrical side wall 52, which can be formed of woven wire mesh, perforated sheet metal or the like. To aid and promote the tumbling action of the parts within the rotating drum, the internal surface of the drum is provided with a series of lifter plates or baffies 53 extending longitudinally of the drum and generally parallel to its axis.

The ends of the container 47 are enclosed by end plates, with one of the end plates 54 being fixed to the cylindrical side wall 52 and having an axially extending extension 55 with notches therein to engage a drive mechanism mounted within the chamber 17.

The drive mechanism for rotating the drum 47 includes a shaft 58 which extends through the end wall of the washing chamber 17 and is journaled within bearings 59. A seal 60 is disposed around the shaft 58. Located on the inner end of the shaft 58 is a cross bar 61 or dog which is adapted to engage the notch in the cylindrical extension 55 of drum 47.

To drive the shaft 58, a sprocket 62 is mounted on the outer end of the shaft and a chain connects the sprocket 62 with a sprocket 64 carried by the output shaft of a gear reducer 65 driven by a motor 66.

As previously mentioned, the latches 49 prevent longitudinal movement of the base frame 43 in the washing chamber and insure that the extension 55 of drum 47 will remain in engagement with the driving pin 61 regardless of the unbalance of the load within the drum or other conditions which may produce axial thrust on the drum or its base 43.

The opposite end of the drum 47 has a removable cover plate having a tongue 71 adapted to be received within an opening in the wall of the drum and a spring latch 72 is mounted diametrically oposite the tongue 71 and the inner end of the latch 72 is removably engaged with a second opening in the Wall of the drum. A handle 73 is connected to the latch 72 for removing the cover plate 70. In some cases the cylindrical wall of the drum 47 can also be provided with an auxiliary loading opening, enclosed by a hinged or removable door.

During the cleaning cycle, the drum 47 is rotated and the cleaning solution is discharged from nozzles 39 and passes through the perforated wall of the rotating drum and into contact with the tumbling parts. After cleaning, the discharge of cleaning solution from nozzles 39 is terminated, but the rotation of the drum can be continued to remove solution trapped in cupped parts and to facilitate drying of the parts.

Loops 74 are mounted on the outer surface of the drum 47 and are adapted to be engaged by a lifting mechanism, such as a crane or the like, to lift the drum 47 when the drum is filled with machine parts.

The interior of the drum 47 can be divided into smaller size compartments by a series of transverse partitions 75 provided with notches which receive the bafiles 53 on the inside of the drum 47. The partitions 75 are provided with spacer bars 76 to bear against the container end wall 54 or against an adjacent partition. The spacer bars 76 can be made of different lengths to provide compartments of different capacities when small quantities of different parts are to be cleaned at the same time.

When the present invention is used for cleaning parts which do not tumble freely, some surfaces of the parts may fail to be fully exposed to the jets of cleaning solution being discharged from nozzles 39. Under such circumstances a hollow shaft 77 can be substituted for the shaft 58 and a pipe 78 extends within the hollow interior of shaft 77 and into the interior of the rotating drum 47 The outer end of the pipe 7 8 is supported by a bracket 79 and the pipe 78 is connected by suitable piping, not

shown, to the reservoir of cleaning solution. Pipe 78 has a series of nozzles 80 which are located somewhat below a plane through the axis of the drum 47 and for a substantial part of each drum revolution the nozzles 80 are below the upper surface of the tumbling mass when the drum has the desired load (approximately half filled) and is being rotated at the optimum speed. Hence, the nozzles 80 provide both agitation and cleaning in the interior of the mass of parts.

In some factories it is common practice to handle small parts in boxes made of perforated sheet metal or relatively heavy wire mesh. A provision is made, as shown in FIGS. 8 and 9, to incorporate such tote boxes as part of the drum or container, thus reducing the labor of loading and unloading the drum. In this embodiment the drum is formed with only a partial side wall 84 and the circular roller tracks 48 are secured to this side wall portion 84. In addition, a frame of angle irons 85 is attached to the interior of the tracks 48 and the angles 85 provide guides to receive a rectangular, open-top tote box 68 which is inserted endwise into the guides 85- in the manner of a drawer. The ends of the guides 85 are preferably joined by cross plates to reinforce the guides and form a frame for supporting the box 86. In addition, partial end plates 88 and 89 are secured to the ends of the side wall 84 and a spring latch 90 mounted on one of the cross members of the frame 8-5 engages the end of the box 86 and maintains the box in position on frame 85 regardless of the end thrust thereon.

FIG. illustrates a modified form of the invention in which the container is rotated by hydraulic action. In this embodiment the container 47 is provided with a series of buckets 91 which are spaced circumferentially of the container in the manner of the buckets on the rotor of a hydraulic turbine of the impulse type. The buckets 91 are arranged with respect to the nozzles 39 of the top pipe 38 so that the jets from the nozzles 39 strike the buckets and rotate the container. The nozzles of the top pipe 38 are preferably made, as indicated at 92, in the form used for impulse type hydraulic turbine nozzles. If the pressure of the cleaning solution is too low to provide adequate rotation of the drum, an increased number of the pipes 38 can be provided with nozzles 92 placed as indicated in FIG. 11 to direct jets against the buckets as they rotate into line with the nozzles.

FIGS. 12 through 16 illustrate a modified form of the invention in which the washing chamber is provided with a pair of oppositely located doors so that the drum containing the parts to be washed can be moved straight through the washing chamber. In this embodiment the cleaning apparatus includes a tank 93, which corresponds generally to tank of the first embodiment and a washing chamber 94 is mounted on the tank and is provided with a suitable drain whereby the spent cleaning solution can be returned to the reservoir located within the tank 9 3.

Opposite ends of the washing chamber 94 are provided with openings which are enclosed by sliding doors 95. Extending within the chamber 94 is a guide track 96 and a drum 97 containing the parts to be cleaned is moved over the guide track 96 and into the washing chamber 94.

As best shown in FIGS. 13 and 16, the guide track 96 includes a pair of spaced angle supports 98 and a plurality of rollers 99 are rotatably mounted on the upstanding flanges of the angle supports 98 and serve as a guide track for movement of the drum 97 The drum 97 is rotatably mounted on a frame 100 which is generally rectangular in shape. Extending downwardly from the side edges of the frame 100 are a pair of inverted channels 101 which are adapted to ride on the rollers 99 of the guide track 96.

To mount the drum 97 for rotation, a pair of brackets 103 extend upwardly from each corner of the frame 100 and rollers 104 are journaled within each pair of brackets 103. As in the case of the first embodiment, circumferential guide tracks 10 5 are secured to the outer surface of the drum 97 and the rollers 104 ride between the side edges of the tracks 105 to guide the drum in rotation.

The drum 97 is similar in construction to the drum 47 of the first embodiment and has a perforated, cylindrical wall so that water can pass through the wall of the rotating drum and into contact with the parts contained therein.

Located in alignment with one end of the guide track 96 is a swivel track 106 which includes a rotatable platform or turntable 107 which is mounted for rotation on a stationary frame 108. As best shown in FIG. 15, track 106 is similar in construction to track. 96, including a pair of spaced angles 109, and a series of rollers 110 are mounted for rotation on the upstanding flanges of angles 109. In normal operation, the swivel track 106 is disposed in alignment with the track 96 so that the drum 97 can be moved into the washing chamber on the aligned tracks. However, the swivel track 106 can be manually pivoted up to 90 to bring the swivel track into alignment with the end of a feed track or other conveyor, not shown, which is positioned at an angle with respect to the track 96 in washer 97. 'With the swivel track 106 aligned with the feed track, a drum can be moved onto track, and by rotating the swivel track into alignment with track 96, the drum can then be moved onto track 96 in washer 97. This feature reduces the overall space required for the conveying system utilized within the Washing chamber.

To lock the swivel track 106 in alignment with the guide track 96, a spring loaded pin 111 is mounted on the frame 108 and is engageable with a latch 112 on the turn-table 107.

The cleaning solution contained within the tank 93 is supplied to the washing chamber 94 in a manner similar to that described in the first embodiment, and the water is discharged toward the drum 97 through a series of nozzles 113 in longitudinal pipes 114. Nozzles 113 correspond to nozzles 39 of the first embodiment.

One end of the drum 97 is enclosed by a removable cover 115, similar to cover 70 of drum 47, while the opposite end is enclosed by a fixed cover 116 which carries a central stub shaft 117 and a notch 118 is formed in the outer end of stub shaft 117.

A drive unit, indicated generally by 119, is located within the chamber 94 and is adapted to engage the notch 118 in shaft 117 and thereby rotate the drum 97 about its axis. As the drum 97 is adapted to move straight through the washing chamber 94, the drive unit 119 is pivoted manually out of the path of travel of the drum after the cleaning operation so that the drum can be removed from the opposite end of the chamber.

The drive unit 119 comprises a pair of generally parallel arms 120 and the upper ends of the arms are secured to a horizontal shaft 121 which is journaled within bearings 122 supported from a plate 123 attached to the wall of the chamber 94. The lower ends of the arms 120 carry a shaft 124 and a dog or bar 125 is secured to the end of the shaft 124 and is adapted to engage the notch 118 in shaft 117 to drive the drum.

To rotate the shaft 124 and thereby drive the drum, a pair of sprockets 126 and 127 are secured to the shafts 117 and 120, respectively, and a chain 128 connects the sprockets. The outer end of shaft 121 extends through the end wall 139 of the washing chamber and carries a sprocket 130 which is connected by chain 131 to a sprocket 132 on the drive shaft 133 of a motor and speed reducing unit 134. Thus, rotation of shaft 121 by the drive mechanism 134 acts through chain drive 128 to rotate shaft 124 and dog 125 and thereby rotate the drum 97 about its axis.

The arms 120 are adapted to be pivoted about the shaft 121 from an operative position in which the dog 125 is disposed in engagement with the notch 118 of shaft 117 to an inoperative position, as shown by the phantom lines in FIG. 12, in which the arms are disposed generally vertically outside of the path of travel of the drum through the wash chamber. To pivot the arms between the operative and inoperative positions, a pair of links 135 are pivotally connected to the arms 120 by pin 136, as best illustrated in FIG. 14, and the inner ends of links 135 are connected to the outer ends of links 137 by a pin 138. The inner ends of the links 137 are secured to a horizontal shaft 139 which is journaled within bearings 140 mounted on the side wall 141 of wash chamber 94. The outer end of the shaft 139 projects through the wall 129 and carries a handle 142. By manual rotation of the handle 142, the shaft 139 can be rotated to pivot the links 137 and 135 and thereby move the arms 120 between the operative and inoperative positions.

In operation, the drum 97 which is mounted on the drum frame 100 is positioned on the swivel track 106 at one end of the apparatus. The drum can either be positioned on the swivel track by the use of a crane or other lifting mechanism, or it can be conveyed onto the swivel track from a conveyor system.

The arms 120 are then pivoted to the operating position by a rotating handle 142 and at this time the drive mechanism can be operating so that the dog 125 is slowly rotating. The drum frame 100 carrying the drum 97 is then pushed onto the guide track 96 in the wash chamber 94 until the notch 118 engages the dog 125. The notch 118 will engage the dog even though the dog is rotating because of the relatively slow rotation of the dog. With the notch 118 engaged with the dog 125 the drum will then rotate about its axis. Following this, the doors 95 are lowered and the pump is operated to thereby spray the cleaning solution through the nozzles 113 onto the parts rotating and tumbling within the drum 97.

The drum frame 100 is held in position to maintain the driving connection between the dog 125 and the drum shaft 117 by a pair of lugs 143 which are pivotally connected to the brackets 144 in wash chamber 94 and are manually pivoted to a position where they abut the end of the drum frame 100 and prevent longitudinal movement of the drum frame in a rearward direction, thereby maintaining the driving connection between dog 125 and shaft 117.

After the washing operation has been completed, the doors 95 are raised, the lugs 143 are pivoted to the inoperative position and the drum is backed off slightly so that the notch 118 moves out of engagement with the dog 125. The handle 142 is then rotated to pivot the arms 120 to the vertical or inoperative position. With the arms in the vertical position, the drum frame 100 can then be pushed forwardly so that the frame and drum will move out of the opposite end of the washing chamber without interference with the arms. A second drum frame 100 carrying a drum 97 can then be moved into position within the wash chamber and the washing operation repeated.

While the structure shown in FIGS. 12-16 is particularly adaptable for a straight-through process in which the parts move in a straight-line path of travel through the washing chamber, the structure can also be employed in a reciprocating process in which the drum is moved into the washing chamber and withdrawn through the same opening.

We claim:

1. In an apparatus for cleaning small articles, a housing defining a chamber and having an opening therein, a track extending through said opening into said chamber, a rotatable member mounted for movement on said track and having a perforated cylindrical wall and an open end and a closed end, the axis of cylindrical wall being parallel to said track, a frame mounted within said rotatable member, a box insertable through said open end and removably mounted in said frame and having open walls, said box adapted to contain said articles to be cleaned,

drive means operably connected to said closed end for rotating said rotatable member within the washing chamber, and fluid discharge means located within the chamber and outside of said rotatable member and including a series of outlets disposed to direct cleaning fluid toward said rotatable member, said fluid passing through the open wall of said rotatable member and through the open walls of the box and into contact with the articles contained within the box.

2. In an apparatus for cleaning articles, a housing defining a chamber and having an opening therein, a track extending through said opening and into said chamber, a rotatable container having open walls and adapted to contain the articles to be cleaned, means for guiding the container for movement on said track, liquid discharge means disposed within the chamber and including a series of outlets disposed to direct cleaning liquid toward said container, drive means located within the chamber and including a first clutch member, and a second clutch member connected to said container and arranged to engage said first clutch member when the container is moved into the washing chamber on said track, said drive means being movable from an operative position, whereat said first clutch member is disposed in alignment with said second clutch member, to an inoperative position whereat said drive means is laterally offset from said track to thereby enable said container to be moved through said chamber on said track.

3. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein said drive means is pivotable between said operative and inoperative positions, and said apparatus includes means for pivoting aid drive means between said operative and inoperative positions.

4. The apparatus of claim 3, wherin said drive unit is pivotable around a horizontal axis and within a plane extending transversely of said track.

5. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein said drive means includes an arm having one end pivotally connected to said housing and the opposite end of said are carries said first clutch member, and said drive means includes a driving element carried by said arm for rotating said first clutch member.

6. In an apparatus for cleaning articles, a housing defining a chamber and having openings in opposite ends thereof, a track extending within the chamber and through said openings, a rotatable container adapted to contain the articles to be cleaned and having open walls, means for guiding the container for movement on said track, fluid discharge means disposed within the chamber and including a series of fluid outlets disposed to direct a cleaning fluid toward said container, drive means connected to the housing and including a first clutch member, and a second clutch member associated with said container and arranged to engage said first clutch member when the container is moved through one of said openings into said chamber bn said track, engagement of said clutch members serving to rotate said container about its axis, and means connected to said first clutch member for moving the first clutch member to an inoperative retracted position wherein said first clutch member is disposed out of alignment with said second clutch member and the container can be moved from the housing through the other of said openings without interference with said first clutch member.

7. The apparatus of claim 6 and including a tank forming a reservoir for a cleaning fluid and located beneath said chamber, a drain connecting the chamber to said tank for conducting the spent cleaning fluid from the chamber to said tank, and pump means for supplying said fluid from the tank to said fluid discharge means.

8. The apparatus of claim 6, and including a carriage to rotatably support the container, said carriage being mounted for movement on said track.

9. The apparatus of claim 6, wherein said container is provided with a series of transverse partition 'walls to divide the interior of the container into a series of compartments, and spacer means for spacing the transverse walls apart.

10. The apparatus of claim 9, wherein the container is generally cylindrical in shape and said spacer means extend longitudinally of said container.

11. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein said first clutch member is laterally offset from said track when in said inoperative position.

'12. The apparatus of claim 6, and including removable means for preventing movement of said container on said track and maintaining engagement of said clutch members.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Haskins 134-153 Moody 134-159 Biggert et al.

Zademach et al 134-148 Kearney 134112 XR Efiinger 134-165 XR Umbricht et a1. 134153 XR Roberts 51-164 ROBERT L. BL-EUTGE, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3 ,487, 840 Dated Janualy 6, 1970 Inventor(s) Wallace 1. Stenzel and Colin L. Onan It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 8, line 41, cancel "arc" and substitute --arm-- SIGNED KND SEALED JUL14197O Aneat:

Edward M. Fletcher, In. mm

E. 5am, JR- Anesnng Officer Omissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US457317 *Jun 18, 1888Aug 4, 1891Gilbert montagueeaskins
US537299 *Jul 2, 1892Apr 9, 1895 Dish-cleaner
US2158687 *May 29, 1936May 16, 1939United Eng Foundry CoMethod and apparatus for treating metal
US2440134 *Jul 20, 1943Apr 20, 1948Metalwash Machinery CompanyApparatus for treating articles
US2808064 *May 5, 1954Oct 1, 1957Detrex Chem IndDegreasing machine
US2857922 *Oct 9, 1951Oct 28, 1958Shell DevApparatus for cleaning tube bundles
US2918071 *Dec 20, 1954Dec 22, 1959Ajem Lab IncArticle washing apparatus
US3134203 *Aug 8, 1962May 26, 1964Silver Service CorpTumbling apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3691692 *Feb 8, 1971Sep 19, 1972Boehler & Co Ag GebApparatus for continuously cleaning the surface of elongated stock
US4209344 *May 16, 1977Jun 24, 1980Monsanto CompanyDelabeling hollow articles
US4232486 *Nov 14, 1978Nov 11, 1980Rampe ResearchTumbler-type finishing machine
US4362289 *Apr 12, 1979Dec 7, 1982Ancel Products, Inc.Support base for a machine or the like
US4739782 *May 7, 1987Apr 26, 1988Nourie Robert LPower spray parts washing machine
US4765092 *Feb 16, 1982Aug 23, 1988Cline Dean RMethod and apparatus for growing sprouts
US5437296 *Jun 7, 1994Aug 1, 1995Pure Oil Engineering & Consultants CompanySelf-contained mobile heat exchange tube bundle cleaning device
US5439655 *Jun 15, 1993Aug 8, 1995Fedegari Autoclavi S.P.A.Apparatus for washing and sterilizing rubber plugs or the like which may be used in pharmaceutical containers
US5836101 *Oct 29, 1996Nov 17, 1998Tuan; Charles Tze-AnBrine shrimp separation apparatus and methods
US8671872 *Jun 29, 2009Mar 18, 2014Thomas Engineering Inc.Production coater with exchangeable drums
US20100221374 *Sep 2, 2010Le Floc H Jean YModular tablet press and coater
EP0460344A2 *Jan 2, 1991Dec 11, 1991Dietwart VölpelDevice for cleaning and sterilizing of parts, especially pharmaceutical fasteners
EP0575005A1 *Jun 16, 1993Dec 22, 1993Fedegari Autoclavi SpaApparatus for washing and sterilizing rubber plugs or the like which may be used in pharmaceutical containers
EP0614618A1 *Mar 9, 1994Sep 14, 1994F C BApparatus for washing beets
EP2263810A1 *Jun 15, 2010Dec 22, 2010Oswald MaroltDevice for cleaning bulk material
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/112, 134/153, 134/148, 451/328, 134/165
International ClassificationB08B3/06, B24B31/02, B24B31/00
Cooperative ClassificationB08B3/06, B24B31/02
European ClassificationB24B31/02, B08B3/06