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Publication numberUS3489084 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 13, 1970
Filing dateApr 25, 1967
Priority dateApr 25, 1967
Publication numberUS 3489084 A, US 3489084A, US-A-3489084, US3489084 A, US3489084A
InventorsJack L Culbertson, Glenn L Strickland
Original AssigneeGlenn L Strickland, Jack L Culbertson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bed and platen printing machine with envelope feed means
US 3489084 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 13, 1970 G. STRICKLAND ETAL 3,489,084

BED AND PLATEN PRINTING MACHINE WITH ENVELOPE FEED MEANS Filed April 25, 1967 3 Sheets-Sheet l 50 53 I I 3 2b INVENTORS. I GLENN L. STRICKLAND BY 6, JACK L. CULBERTSON ATTORNEYS.

b11413, 1970 s. 1.. STRICKLAND ETAL 3,489,084

BED AND PLATEN PRIN'TTNG MACHINE WITH ENVELOPE FEED MEANS Filed April 25, 1967 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 32 4' FW- INVENTORS.

GLENN L.. STRICKLAND BY dAcK L.CULBE.RTSON ATTORNEY 1970 G. 1.. STRICKLAND ETAL 3,489,084

BED AND PLATEN P'RIN'TTNG MACHINE WITH ENVELOPE FEED MEANS Filed April 25, 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 I36- I55 Hi ,//.7 /2o I I f 43 49 99m K 2 v k i w m INVENTORS.

GLENN L. STR\CKL.AND g BY & dACK L. CULBERTSON ATTORNE 5.

United States Patent 3,489,084 BED AND PLATEN PRINTING MACHINE WITH ENVELOPE FEED MEANS Glenn L. Strickland, Howland Road, Asheville, N.C.

28804, and Jack L. Culbertson, Cedar Hill Road, Asheville, NC.

Filed Apr. 25, 1967, Ser. No. 633,620 Int. Cl. B41f 1/00, 1/06, 13/24 US. Cl. 101-287 6 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The invention relates to a printing press, and more particularly to a printing press which is capable of efficiently and rapidly printing headings and the like on items such as envelopes.

Heretofore, printing presses which were utilized for printing headings on envelopes frequently used rotating rubber plates which produced a mediocre copy of print. Since the plate is carried on a cylinder, the leading edge of the type would cause the leading edge of the printed characters to be slightly larger than the center of the printed letter. Such would, also, be the case of the trailing edge of the printed character as compared to the center.

In order for job printers, that is, small printers, to produce an envelope of high quality he must go to a conventional printing press which prints the indicia by reciprocating the printing plates in a substantially vertical manner. Such printing presses operate satisfactory for printing sheets and the like; however, they are relatively slow and expensive and thus, inefficient for printing small items, such as envelopes.

In order for the job printer to produce an envelope of high quality he is restricted as previously mentioned to a machine or press which will print approximately 4,000 envelopes an hour. To increase this speed he must go to a special press which utilizes the rubber plate method of printing thus, sacrificing quality in the printing of the envelope. Moreover, the rubber plate printing press is an expensive device, and as a result, the average jobber cannot afford to make this kind of investment for short run work.

Another problem with such machines is the relatively long period of time necessary to convert the press from printing flat sheets and the like to printing headings on envelopes. As is the case in many businesses, it is desired to maintain the running time of the press at a maximum as compared to the running time and the changeover time.

One of the reasons that the changeover time for the conventional press is long is that the platen has to be built-up while on the press. In order to obtain high quality printing of envelopes which vary in thickness due to the different number of layers of paper, a platen must be positioned directly under the envelope where the printing head is to strike the envelope. The platen is built-up with pieces of paper so that its thickness is the complement of that of the envelope where the printing operation is to take place. In other words, if the total thickness at any one point on the envelope is four layers of paper, and at 3,489,084 Patented Jan. 13, 1970 another point it is only one layer, then the platen must be built-up so that the total thickness of the envelope and platen is the same under the area upon which the printing is to take place.

In the press constructed in accordance with the subject invention ready-made platens are provide so that they can be changed quickly by loosening a single screw and sliding the platen out and reinserting another ready-made plate. These platens are conveniently stored in a suitable library for subsequent use with similar styles of envelopes.

Another problem encountered in printing presses which utilize Linotype slugs carried in a chase is that sometimes the spacing slugs will work-up and come up level with the letters carried on the Linotype slugs to produce a splotch during the printing operation. This results in an unacceptable print. Such a problem would be especially prevalent in high speed printing presses where the centrifugal force is great.

Heretofore, in platen printing presses, after the printing of an envelope had taken place the envelope was either moved to the side or retracted. In the press constructed in accordance with the subject invention the envelope continues in its original direction to a collecting hopper. Thus, the speed of the printing operation can be increased.

Accordingly, it is an important object of the subject invention to provide a high speed and inexpensive printing press for printing letter heads and the like on items such as envelopes.

Another important object of this invention is to provide a printing press wherein such can be readily converted from printing one style of envelopes to another.

Still another important object of the present invention is to provide a printing press with a chase which securely carries Linotype slugs on which letters are embossed so that it is impossible for any part of the form which includes the slugs and Spacers to work up.

A further important object of the present invention is to provide a printing press with an efiicient feeder for envelopes, a delivery system which includes a stop mechanism for properly positioning the envelopes during the printing operation, and a more efiicient carry-through operation of the envelopes after such have been printed.

Still another important object of the present invention is to provide a reciprocating stop mechanism for positively and accurately positioning an envelope or the like under a printing head each and every time. Such allows the press to print several different colors in perfect register.

A further important object of the present invention is to provide a printing press wherein the entire operation of such is synchronized from a single rotating shaft so that each operation can take place at the proper and exact preselected time.

A further important object of the present invention is to provide a printing press having a printing bed incorporating a platen which can be readily changed and a different platen taken from a suitable library can be substituted therefor.

A further important object of the present invention is to provide a printing press having a substantially cylindrical printing head with an inking roller assembly which maintains the inking rolls in contact with the printing head at all times while running at a high rate of speed.

Still a further important object of the present invention is to provide a printing press which requires a minimum of maintenance while achieving high quality printing at a rapid speed.

A further important object of the present invention is to provide a printing press with a loading and unloading system for envelopes and the like, which do not require the machine or press to be stopped during such processes.

The construction designed to carry out the invention 3 will be hereinafter described, together with other features thereof.

The invention will be more readily understood from a reading of the following specification and by reference to the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof, wherein an example of the invention is shown and where- FIGURE 1 is a side elevation illustrating a printing press constructed in accordance with the present invention,

FIGURE 2 is a plan view illustrating the printing press shown in FIGURE 1,

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken along line 33 of FIGURE 2 showing the feeder hopper, the feeder blade, and the drive mechanism for such,

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken along line 44 of FIGURE 3 illustrating the bottom portion of the feeder hopper and the feeder blade engaging the flap on a bottom envelope of a stack of envelopes carried in the hopper,

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged sectional elevation illustrating the printing head, the printing bed, and the stop guide for arresting the movement of envelopes under the printing head for carrying out the printing operation,

FIGURE 6 is a cross-sectional view of the platen illus trating the manner in which such is built-up,

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional view illustrating the printing head and the apparatus for maintaining the inking rolls in contact with the printing head, and

FIGURE 8 is a perspective view illustrating a Linotype slug constructed in accordance with the present invention.

The drawings illustrate a printing press for printing headings and the like on items such as envelopes. A feed hopper A is provided for carrying a stack of envelopes having their flaps facing downwardly. The hopper A has an elongated opening adjacent the front, bottom portion thereof, and a slot in the bottom thereof, permitting the flap of the bottom envelope of the stack to extend therein. A reciprocating feeder blade B is carried adjacent the bottom of the hopper. An envelope conveyor C is positioned adjacent the front of the hopper. The feeder blade B is provided with means for propelling such forward for engaging the flap of the bottom envelope moving the envelope onto the conveyor C. A reciprocating stop guide D arrests the movement of the envelope adjacent one end of the conveyor C for positioning the envelope for printing. A printing head E reciprocates in a substantially vertical path for printing indicia on the envelope when such is in the arrested position. A receiving hopper F is carried adjacent the end of the conveyor for receiving the printed envelopes. Means is provided for moving the stop guide D out of the path of the envelope allowing the conveyor C to eject the printed envelope from the arrested position to the receiving hopper F. Thus, the path traveled by the envelope from the feed hopper to the receiving hopper is straight and as a result, a faster printing operation can take place. A rotating drive shaft G is coupled by linkage to the feeder blade B, the stop guide D, and the printing head E, for synchronizing the movement of such relative to each other. A chase H is carried in a lower portion of the printing head. The chase is provided with flanges for receiving Linotype slugs I, and spacing slugs which also have slots therein which fit on the flanges in the chase for securing them therein. An inking roll assembly I is carried on the printing head for maintaining the inking rollers in contact with the printing head as such is reciprocated at a high rate of speed.

In order to minimize the changeover time necessary in converting the press from one style envelope to another ready-made platens K are utilized. A platen K can be slipped out of the printing bed and :a platen secured from a suitable library can be substituted therefor.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, the printing press is mounted on a pair of spaced vertical side walls 10 and 11, respectively. Suitable cross-bracing, such as bars 12, connect the two side walls 10 and 11 together forming a frame. A base plate 13 also connects the side walls together in order to make the frame rigid. Directly below the feeder hopper A is a flat plate 14, which is secured to the side walls 10 and 11, respectively, by any suitable means such as angle-irons 14a and 14b, which are in turn, welded or secured by any suitable means between the flat plate 14 and the side walls.

The feeder hopper A is constructed of two laterally disposed U-shaped members 15 and 16, respectively. The inwardly turned edges 15a and 15b of the U-shaped member 15, and the inwardly turned edges of the U- shaped member 16, are provided for accommodating a stack of envelopes 17 therebetween. The feed hopper A has a vertical section 18 which maintains the envelopes 17 in a vertical stack. The vertical section 18 terminates in an inclined section 19 which causes the bottom envelope to be displaced forwardly slightly more than the envelope carried thereabove. Such is to aid in the feeding operation. By utilizing a hopper having a vertical section 18 terminating in an inclined portion 19 the weight of the stack of envelopes rest on the trailing edge of the bottom envelope and the U-shaped members 15 and 16. Such permits a large stack of envelopes to be carried in the feeder hopper A, while permitting the bottom envelope to be easily removed therefrom.

The hopper A has an elongated opening 20 adjacent the front bottom portion thereof, and a slot or opening 21 in the bottom thereof, permitting a fiap 22 of the bottom envelope 17 to extend therethrough. A bar 23 is carried between the side U-shaped members 15 and 16, respectively, of the hopper and supports a center springbiased separator 24. The center spring-biased separator 24 is constructed of spring steel, and has one end attached to the bar 23 by means of a screw 25. The free-end of the center spring-biased separator 24 curves inwardly and extends slightly below the bottom of the hopper into the elongated opening 20. Such is to prevent more than one envelope from being moved from the hopper at a time. When an envelope is shifted through the elongated opening 20 the center spring-biased separator 24 rides on top of the envelope preventing another envelope from riding thereon. Additional spring tension side separators 26 are carried adjacent the front side of the U-shaped members 15 and 16 for preventing the ends of the envelope from folding up when such is moved from the hopper A onto the conveyor C. These spring tension side separators 26 are constructed of a thin piece of flat wire which extend from the hopper onto the conveyor.

The bottom of a hopper A is open and the bottom envelope 17 of the stack rests on the feeder blade B. The feeder blade B includes a thin flat plate 27 which when moved forward engages the flap 22 of the bottom envelope and moves the envelope forward into engagement with the feed rollers 28 and 29 forming a part of the conveyor C. The flat plate feeder blade 27 is secured by screws to a block 30 which is, in turn, secured by screws to a smaller block 31 which has a reduced portion 32 which extends through an elongated slot 33 in the base plate 14. In operation the reduced portion 32 is reciprocated within the slot 33 causing the feeder blade 27 to engage the flap 22 of the bottom envelope 17 for moving the envelopes from the hopper to the conveyor. The block 31 has a dove tail portion 34 into which locking pieces 35 engage for guiding the feeder blade assembly when such is being reciprocated.

An envelope conveyor C is positioned adjacent the front of the hopper A for transporting the envelopes from the hopper to the printing head E. The conveyor includes the feed roller 29 which is driven by means of a belt 29a. A plurality of laterally spaced belts 36 are connected between the feed roller 29 and a delivery drive roller 37. A conventional spring-biased tensioning roll 38 is in engagement with the belt or belt 36 for maintaining the proper tension therein. A delivery roller 39 is driven off the delivery roller 37 by means of belt 40. Tension is maintained in the belt 40 by means of a spring-biased tensioning roller 41. The spring-biased tensioning roller 41 is journaled on the end of a pivotally mounted lever arm 42 which has its free-end connected to a screw 43 by means of a spring 44. The belt 40 is carried adjacent the side wall so as not to interfere with the operation of the printing head E and the reciprocating stop guide D.

The feed roller 28, which is carried directly above the feed roller 29, is journaled between a pair of spaced vertical bearing posts 45 which have their lower-end anchored to the side walls and 11, respectively. A spring 46 engages a bearing 47 in which the shaft of the drive roller 28 is journaled and pulls such downwardly so that the drive roller 28 is in engagement with the drive roller 29 and rotates therewith. The lower-end of the spring 46 is anchored by means of a screw 48 to the side frame member 10. The bearing 47 is allowed to move downwardly within a slot 47a and is held in such position by the spring 46. The delivery roller 39 also has an engaging spring-biased roller 49 carried thereabove for rotating therewith.

After the envelope has been printed roller 37, which is in engagement with the trailing edge of the envelope, forces such between the rollers 39 and 40. The drive rollers 39 and 49, in turn, eject the envelope into the receiving hopper F. The rollers 29, 38, 37 and 39 are journaled in side plates 50 and 51, respectively. These side plates are secured to the side walls 10 and 11. As shown in FIGURE 2, there are five belts 36 connecting the rollers 29 and 37 and a single belt 40 connecting the roller 37 to roller 39.

When the. envelope is being shifted forward on the conveyor C, ball bearings 52 inserted in an elongated carrier 53 ride on top of the envelope for maintaining such in contact with the conveyor belts 36. There are two laterally disposed carriers 53 which are in turn, secured by screws 54 to a horizontal brace 55 having downwardly turned flanges 56 adjacent its outer ends for securing such to the side walls 10 and 11, respectively. A horizontal metal plate 57 is carried between rollers 29 and 37 directly below the conveyor belt 36 for partially supporting the belt. The metal plate 57 is mounted on the side plates 50 and 51, respectively. Another smaller metal plate 58 is carried between the rollers 37 and 39, and forms a portion of the printing bed upon which the platen K is supported. The metal plate 58 is also carried between the side plates 50 and 51, respectively. It is noted that the metal plate 58 is recessed sufficiently so that when the platen K is mounted thereon, the top of the platen K is level with the tapes carried by the conveyors.

A reciprocating stop guide D is provided for arresting the movement of the envelope adjacent one end of the conveyor for positioning the envelope on the platen K so that the printing operation can take place. The stop guide includes a pair of laterally spaced vertical arms 59; the free-ends of which extend above the surface of the platen K for engaging the front edge of the envelope being carried on the conveyor and arresting such directly under the printing head E. The other end of the vertical arms 59 are secured to a shaft 60 which is journaled between the side plates 50 and 51, respectively. Thus, when the shaft 60 is rotated approximately 45 degrees in a counterclockwise direction the vertical arm 59 is shifted to the dotted line position (FIGURE 5) out of the path of the envelope and the rollers 39 and 49 eject the envelope into the receiving hopper F. The manner in which the shaft 60 is rotated will be discussed more fully below in connection with the drive linkage.

A printing head E reciprocates in a substantially vertical path for printing indicia on envelopes and the like, when they are in the arrested position. The printing head E is cylindrical in shape and has a flat area adjacent the bottom in which the chase H is carried and a flat portion adjacent the front thereof. The printing head E is bolted to an angle-iron 61 by means of bolts 62 and the flat front portion is flush against the vertical portion of the angle-iron. The printing head in the embodiment illustrated is constructed of aluminum and has longitudinal bores 63 drilled therein, so as to decrease the weight of such.

A receiving hopper F is carried on the side walls 10 and 11, respectively, for receiving envelopes being ejected by the delivery rollers 39 and 49, respectively. The receiving hopper has a vertical side wall 64 being joined by a bottom 66. A pair of guiding vertical arms 67 having their lower ends joined to the bottom 66 of the hopper extend upwardly adjacent the top of the hopper for directing the envelopes into the hopper when such strikes an inwardly inclined portion 68 adjacent the upper ends thereof. The side of the hopper F opposite the side wall 64 is open for removing the printed envelopes 17 while in operation.

All of the moving parts of the printing press are driven off a main drive shaft G, which is journaled between the side walls 10 and 11. The shaft is rotate-d by an electric motor 69 mounted on the base plate 13. A belt 70 couples the drive shaft of the electric motor to a fly wheel 71 fixed to the drive shaft G for rotating such. An eccentric cam 72 is fixed to the drive shaft G and has a groove on its perimeter in which a bearing wheel 73 rides. The bearing wheel 73 is journaled on the end of a pivotal linking arm 74 which pivots about a shaft 75 suitably mounted between the side members 10 and 11, respectively. The upper-end of the linking arm 74 is coupled to the reduced portion 32 of the feeder blade by an adjustable linkage 76. The connections made by the ends of the adjustable linkage to the reduced portion of the block 32 and the linking arm 74 are pivotal connections. Thus, as the drive shaft G is rotating the bearing wheel rides on the eccentric cam 72 and moves to the dotted line position shown in FIGURE 3, and then back causing the linking arm to pivot about shaft 75. As the linking arm is reciprocated in a counterclockwise and clockwise direction the feeder blade is also reciprocated. Thus, on each revolution of the shaft G the feeder blade B is moved forward to engage the flap 22 of the bottom envelope 17 inserting such between the feed rollers 28 and 29, and is then returned to its initial rearward position. A pair of springs 77 and 78, respectively, maintain the bearing wheel 73 in engagement with the eccentric cam 72. Spring 77 is connected between an upper-end of the linking arm 74 and an angle-iron 79 carried between the side walls 10 and 11, respectively. Spring 78 is connected between the lower-end of the linking arm 74 and one of the cross-braces 12.

When the upper-end of the linking arm 74 moves forward a spring-biased plunger 80 suitably mounted thereon engages a pivotally mounted linking arm 81 causing such to rotate in a clockwise direction from the full line position illustrated in FIGURE 5 to the dotted line position. The linking arm 81 is journaled on a shaft 82 and has a stud 83 attached adjacent the top thereof. An intermediate linking arm 84 has one end pivotally secured to the stud 83 and the other end pivotally secured to a stud 85 carried adjacent the lower-end of a linking block 86. The linking block 86 is, in turn, attached to the shaft 60 so that as the pivotally mounted linking arm 81 is shifted from the full line position to the dotted line position the linking block 86 causes the shaft 60 to rotate approximately 45 degrees in the counterclockwise direction. Such causes the vertical arms 59 which forms a portion of the stop guide D to pivot rearwardly.

As previously mentioned, when the vertical arms 59 are allowed to pivot rearwardly, the envelope being printed is ejected by the rollers 49 and 39 into the receiving hopper F. A spring 87 is connected between a fixed portion of the frame 88 and the stud 83 for returning the stop guide and the linkage to the position shown in full lines in FIGURE 5. Thus, if the conveyor conveys an envelope under the printing head when the stop guide D is in the position shown in FIGURE 5 the vertical arm engages 7 the edge of the envelope and arrests Such directly under the printing head E.

The main drive roller 29 of the conveyor C from which all of the rollers are driven is driven off of the drive shaft G by means of a belt 29:: which rides on a pulley 89 carried on the drive shaft G. A spring-biased tensioning pulley 90 also engages the belt 29a for maintaining the proper tension therein. The pulley 90 is a conventional item and is shown in broken lines in FIGURE 1.

As previously mentioned, the printing head E is mounted on an angle-iron 61 which is, in turn, attached between the upper-ends of a pair of vertically reciprocating rods 91 and 91a, respectively. Each of the rods 91 and 91a are freely carried within a pair of bearing posts 92 and 93, respectively, mounted on the side walls 10 and 11 so that the rods can reciprocate in a vertical direction. Pivotally attached adjacent the bottom portion of the rod 91 is a linking arm 94 which, in turn, has its free-end pivotally attached to a rotating arm 95, The rotating arm 95 has its free-end fixed to the shaft G so that as the shaft G rotates such in turn causes the rod 91 to reciprocate in a vertical manner to carry out the printing operation. Thus, it can be seen that all of the moving parts of the press are synchronized since they are driven off the single rotating shaft G.

The printing head E (FIGURE has a recess 96 in the bottom thereof for receiving the chase H. The chase has a pair of side walls 97 and 98, respectively, being joined by a pair of end walls 99 and 100, respectively, defining an opening therebetween. A tapering protrusion 101 extends outwardly from the side wall 97 and fits within a complementary recess in the printing head for aiding in holding the chase H within the printing head E. An elongated rectangular protrusion 102 extends outwardly from the side wall 98 and fits within a complementary rectangular recess within the printing head for aiding in holding the chase H therein. The protrusions 101 and 102 extending within the recesses in the head E prevent the chase H from moving in a vertical direction during the printing operation. The end wall 99 is integral with the side walls 97 and 98, and the end wall 100 is removably secured to the side walls by means of screws 103 which extend through the end wall 100 into the side walls 97 and 98. In order to place Linotype slugs and spaces within the chase the side wall 100 is removed. Flanges 104 and 105 extend inwardly from the end walls 99 and 100, respectively, for accommodating the Linotype slugs I and the spaces carried therein. The Linotype slugs I have a top, bottom, and ends with type 106 carried on the bottom of the slugs projecting therefrom. A slot 107 is cut in each end of the slugs I and are sub stantially the same width of flanges 104 and 105 in the chase H for providing a snug fit when the slugs I are inserted on the flanges of the chase H. The slots 107 are cut into the slug with a conventional printers saw, and are two picas from the bottom of the slug providing a rigid portion above and below the slot 107 for retaining the slugs in the chase. The spacing slugs carried be tween the Linotype slugs I are of the same dimension as the Linotype slugs with the exception that they have no type on the bottom thereof, however, they have similar slots cut therein for retaining such within the chase. Since the slugs are locked within the chase by means of the flanges 104 and 105, respectively, and the slots 107, it is impossible for the slugs or spaces carried therebetween to work-up during the printing operation. It is important that a rigid connection between the slugs and the chase be made since the printing head is reciprocating at a relatively high rate of speed, and if there were any play they would tend to work-up.

A chase spring-loaded locking screw 110 is mounted on the angle-iron 61 and the end of the screw extends through an opening in the side wall of the printing head to engage an indention carried in the rectangular protrusion 102 of the chase for locking the chase within the printing head. In order to remove the chase from the printing head the locking screw is pulled out.

An inking roll assembly I is provided for alternately rotating in a clockwise and counterclockwise direction so as to distribute ink being supplied from an ink fountain 111 over the surface of the printing head E and onto the type 106 carried on the slugs I, within the chase H. The inking roller assembly I is driven off of an inking roller drive shaft 112 journaled on bearings 112a carried Within the printing head E. A pinion gear 113 is carried adjacent one end of the inking roll drive shaft 112 in fixed relation therewith. The pinion gear 113 is in meshed relation with the teeth of a stationary gear track 114 so that as the printing head is reciprocated in a vertical direction during the printing operation the engagement between the pinion gear 113 and the stationary gear track 114 causes the inking roll drive shaft 112 to alternately reciprocate in a clockwise and counterclockwise direction. The gear track 114 is mounted in a fixed relation by any suitable means to the side wall 10. A pair of opposed spaced arms 115 and 116 have one of their ends fixed to the inking roll drive shaft 112 and the other ends extend beyond the periphery of the printing head E. Positioned between the outer-ends of the opposed arms 115 and 116 are a pair of spaced rectangular supporting plates 117 and 118, respectively, in which a pair of inking rollers 119 and 120 are journaled within ball bearings (not shown). Each of the supporting plates 117 and 118 has a supporting pin 121 extending outwardly therefrom. A longitudinal slot 122 is disposed within the outer ends of the arms 115 and 116. An elongated cylindrical slug 123 is slidably carried within each of the longitudinal slots 122. A spring 124 is connected to the inner-end of each of the slugs 123 biasing them inwardly. The other end of the spring 124 is secured to a pin 125 carried within the arms 115 and 116. A lateral slot 126 having closed ends extends through each of the arms 115 and 116 and intersects the longitudinal slot 122. The supporting pins 121 extend through the lateral slot 126 and a small opening in the slug 123 so that the closed end 126a of the lateral slot 126 defines the movement of the inking rollers 119 and 120 during the printing operation. The outer closed end 126a prevents the rollers from moving beyond that point when such is being reciprocated.

A ready-made platen K (FIGURES 5, 6 and 7) is carried in a recess in the printing bed and is supported on the flat metal plate 58. The platen K is secured to the plate 58 by a single screw 127 so that such can be readily changed and another platen from a suitable library can be substituted therefor. The platen K includes an elongated wooden member 128 having one edge of a tympan 129 secured to the edge of such by means of a screw 130. The tympan 129 is stretched over the upper surface of the wooden member 128 and strips of paper 131 or the like, and secured in a groove 132 in the other side by means of an inverted L-shaped member 133 locking the tympan within the groove. The vertical portion of the L-shaped member 133 is secured to the side wall by means of a screw 134.

In order to obtain a high quality of print the platen K should be built-up with strips of paper, such as illustrated at 131, so that the thickness of the platen is the complement of the thickness of the envelope at any given point. For example, if the thickness of the envelope at a particular point is four sheets, then the thickness of the platen at that point may be zero sheets, whereas, at another point if the thickness of the envelope is three sheets of paper, then the thickness of the platen directly under that point would be one sheet in order to balance out the entire surface under the printing head.

The inking roller 119 receives ink from the ink fountain 111. The ink fountain 111 is a conventional ink fountain which may be operated in any suitable manner from the printing press. ,The ink fountain is illustrated in Schematic form, and includes an inking roller 135 which is rotated by a conventional rachet wheel not disclosed. The ink feeding blade 136 is adjusted by means of the adjusting screw 137. By rotating the screw 137 such causes the bottom edge of the feeder blade 136 to be displaced from the inking roller 135 to c ntrol the amount of ink being deposited on the roller. As the roller is rotated, such conveys the ink to the inking roller 119 of the inking roller assembly I when they are brought in contact.

In operation, the envelopes are loaded into the hopper A and the bottom envelope is carried on the feeder blade 27. When the feeder blade 27 is moved forward as the main drive shaft G is rotated, such engages the flap 22 of the bottom envelope pushing such between the drive rolls 28 and 29 of the conveyor C. The envelope is transported by the belts 36 of the conveyor until such strikes the stop guide D. The envelope is positioned directly under the printing head by the vertical arms 59. The printing head E is then moved downwardly into engagement with the envelope printing the heading on such. As the printing head E is raised the vertical arm 59 of the stop guide D is pivoted rearwardly and the roller 37 pushes the envelope into the rollers 39 and 49. Rollers 39 and 49 eject the envelope into the receiving hopper F. It is noted that as the printing head E is moved up and down the pinion 113 engages the fixed gear track 114, causing the inking roller assembly to alternately reciprocate in a clockwise and counterclockwise direction. As the inking roller reciprocates on the printing head B it distributes ink from the ink well 111 onto the type carried in the chase H.

While a preferred embodiment of the invention has been described using specific terms, such description is for illustrative purposes only, and it is to be understood that changes and variations may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the following claims:

What is claimed is:

1. In a printing press for printing headings and the like on items such as envelopes comprising: a frame for the press, a feed hopper for carrying a stack of envelopes having their flaps facing downwardly, said hopper having an elongated opening adjacent the front bottom portion thereof and a slot in the bottom thereof permitting the flap of said bottom envelope of said stack to extend therein, a reciprocating feeder blade carried adjacent the bottom of said hopper, an envelope conveyor positioned adjacent the front of said hopper, means for continuously rotating said conveyor, said conveyor comprising, a pair of feed rollers, continuously driven belts, and a delivery drive roller, means for propelling said feeder blade forward for engaging said flap of said bottom envelope moving said envelope between said feed rollers and onto said belts, a reciprocating stop guide arresting the movement of said envelope adjacent one end of said belts for positioning said envelope for printing, a printing head, means for supporting said printing head on said frame, means for reciprocating said printing head in a substantially verticle path for printing indicia on said envelope when in said arrested position, means for supporting said envelope during printing, said means comprising a platen supported between said rollers and carried by the frame, a receiving hopper carried adjacent the end of said conveyor for receiving said printed envelopes, and means for moving said stop guide out of the path of said envelope following printing allowing said delivery drive roller to eject said printed envelope from said arrested position to said receiving hopper.

2. The printing press as set forth in claim 1 further comprising a rotating drive shaft; linkage means coupling said feeder blade, said stop guide, and said printing head to said drive shaft for synchronizing the movement of such relative to each other.

3. In a printing press for printing headings and the like on items such as envelopes comprising: a frame for the press, a feed hopper for carrying a stack of envelopes having their flaps facing downwardly; said hopper having an elongated opening adjacent the front bottom portion thereof and a slot in the bottom thereof permitting the flap of said bottom envelope of said stack to extend therein; a reciprocating feeder blade carried adjacent the bottom of said hopper; an envelope conveyor positioned adjacent the front of said hopper, means for continuously rotating said conveyor, said conveyor comprising a pair of feed rollers and continuously driven belts, said feed rollers being positioned adjacent the leading edge of said belts; means for propelling said blade forward for engaging said flap of said envelope moving said envelope between said feed rollers which deliver said envelope onto said belts; means for arresting the movement of said envelope adjacent one end of aid belts for positioning said envelope for printing; a printing head, means for supporting said printing head on said frame, means for reciprocating said printing head in a substantially vertical path for printing indici-a on said envelope when in said arrested position; means f r supporting said envelope during printing, said last mentioned means comprising a platen carried by said frame and supported adjacent said belts for supporting said envelope when the printing head engages said envelope during printing; whereby said envelope travels in a straight path from said hopper under said printing head.

4. The printing press as set forth in claim 3 further comprising a rotating drive shaft; linkage means coupling said feeder blade, said stop guide and said printing head to said drive shaft for synchronizing the movement of such relative to each other.

5. The printing press as set forth in claim 4 wherein said hopper has a vertical portion terminating in a forwardly inclined portion; said envelopes carried in said vertical portion resting on the trailing edge of said bottom envelope in said inclined portion and said inclined portion permitting a large stack of envelopes to be carried in the hopper while permitting the bottom envelope to be easily removed therefrom.

6. The printing press as set forth in claim 4 wherein a recessed supporting member is carried below said printing head; a ready-made removable platen carried on said recessed supporting member; an upper surface of said platen being level with said conveyor for receiving envelopes therefrom and supporting said envelopes during the printing operation.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,110,723 9/1914 Spiess 101-320 1,405,515 2/1922 Hughes 101-320 1,717,231 6/1929 Krell 101-287 1,879,964 9/1932 Whitlock 101-287 2,133,261 10/1938 Wolff 101-47 X 2,258,880 10/1941 Bobst 101-287 X 2,521,237 9/1950 Marvin 101-232 2,554,577 5/1951 Lautfer 101-232 X 2,615,392 10/1952 Sauermary 101-473 2,680,614 6/1954 Gibsory 271-44 3,010,716 11/1961 Hirst et a1. 271-44 3,383,106 5/1968 Brown 271-44 WILLIAM B. PENN, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. 101-232, 316

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3576163 *Mar 11, 1969Apr 27, 1971Pitney Bowes IncAutomatic document handling ejection apparatus
US3972280 *Dec 9, 1974Aug 3, 1976Computer Peripherals, Inc.Apparatus for time sharing of horizontal and vertical advance
US4037535 *Dec 12, 1975Jul 26, 1977Burroughs CorporationHigh speed printing apparatus
US4213388 *Sep 18, 1978Jul 22, 1980Windmoller & HolscherGearing for driving a plate cylinder of a printing press at a non-uniform speed
US4441420 *Dec 8, 1982Apr 10, 1984Pitney BowesEnvelope ejection mechanism for a mailing machine
US8708022 *Dec 27, 2007Apr 29, 2014Sato Holdings Kabushiki KaishaLabel peeling unit and label printer
US20100089535 *Dec 27, 2007Apr 15, 2010Shinichiro HosonoLabel peeling unit and label printer
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/287, 101/232, 101/316
International ClassificationB41L45/00
Cooperative ClassificationB41L45/00
European ClassificationB41L45/00