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Publication numberUS3489223 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 13, 1970
Filing dateNov 6, 1967
Priority dateNov 6, 1967
Publication numberUS 3489223 A, US 3489223A, US-A-3489223, US3489223 A, US3489223A
InventorsBundo Benjamin Sr
Original AssigneeBundo Benjamin Sr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-extinguishing receptacle
US 3489223 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 13, 1970 B. BUNDO, SR

SELF-EXTINGUISHING RECEPTACLE Filed NOV. 6, 1967 INVENTOR. BENJAMIN BUN DO SR ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,489,223 SELF-EXTINGUISHING RECEPTACLE Benjamin Bundo, Sr., 21526 Middlebelt Road, Farmington, Mich. 48024 Filed Nov. 6, 1967, Ser. No. 680,901 Int. Cl. A62c 35/02, 3/00 U.S. Cl. 169-26 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An open top receptacle with spaced inner and outer shells forming a closed chamber between the shells has a series of orifices formed around the top of the inner shell and directed towards the interior of the inner shell. An extinguishing solution is contained within the chamber is capable of expanding in response to heat transferred through the walls of the inner shell from a fire in its contents. The expanding solution discharges in the form of a spray through the orifices to extinguish the fire.

A second embodiment has valve means disposed in the chamber for controlling the discharge of the extinguishing solution. The valve means are normally closed so that the receptacle can be tipped by the user without the solution pouring out of the orifices. The valve means are actuated to an open condition when a fire in the contents of the receptacle causes the bottom of the inner shell to flex in the manner of a diaphragm, the motion of the diaphragm being transmitted to the valve.

A third embodiment employs a container of carbon dioxide gas as the source of extinguishing fluid with a heat sensitive valve for opening communication between the carbon dioxide cylinder and the orifices around the inner shell. The condition of the valve is controlled by an elongated tubing around the inner shell. The tubing contains mercury which expands in response to a fire zone in the shell, the expansion of the mercury causing the valve to open.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention This invention relates to self-extinguishing receptacles and more specifically to a container having a double Walled construction forming a substantially closed chamher for an extinguishing solution which expands in reaction to an abnormal temperature caused by a fire within the container and discharges as a spray into the burning contents under the force of expansion.

Description of the prior art Receptacles for receiving Waste combustible materials are often located where they are exposed to a source of ignition. For instance, in places of public amusement, waste receptacles often serve as means for collecting cigarette butts and the like, some of which remain smoldering for a prolonged period of time. Often the contents of the receptacle catch fire after a period of concealed smoldering. Latent fire hazards of this nature have often proven particularly disastrous 'where the receptacle has been left in an unattended building and then burst into flames.

In order to overcome this problem, receptacles are sometimes filled with sand or water for receiving the smoldering waste, however, this approach has usually proven unsatisfactory because of weight, appearance, and cost considerations.

It is the broad purpose of the present invention to provide a self-extinguishing receptacle which responds to an abnormal temperature rise within its interior to spray an extinguishing fluid into the contents disposed within its interior.

SUMMARY The preferred embodiment of the present invention takes the form of an inner and an outer shell joined together to form a hollow walled container with a closed chamber between the walls and bottom of the two shells. The container has an open top for receiving waste materials into the interior of the inner shell.

The inner shell is preferably formed of sheet metal or other heat-conductive material which readily transfers heat from a fire zone within the inner shell into the closed chamber. The chamber is normally filled with a fire extinguishing solution such as water which reacts to an increase in temperature by a pressure increase.

The inner shell has a series of spaced orifices adjacent its open top. A ring-shaped tubular member within the chamber has a series of perforations in registry with the orifices. A vertical extension of the tubular ring terminates adjacent the bottom of the chamber and is adapted to receive the pressurized solution and to deliver it to the ring where it discharges through the orifices in a spray into the interior of the inner shell. A valve normally plugs the lower end of the tubular extension and is carried by a pivotally supported arm which moves the valve to an open condition in response to an abnormal temperature condition in the inner shell.

An abnormal temperature condition is mechanically reflected in the arm by the bottom of the inner shell which acts as a diaphragm as it flexes in response to a pressure increase of the heated solution within the chamber. It has been found that a relatively slight pressure increase caused by a temperature rise in the solution is sufficient to flex the bottom of the inner shell and open the valve thereby permitting the pressurized solution to discharge into the interior of the inner shell.

This concept of a self-contained, self-extinguishing Waste receptacle is illustrated in a second embodiment which also comprises a double walled container. In this form of the invention, a container of carbon dioxide, under pressure, is mounted on the receptacle with conduit means arranged to deliver the carbon dioxide through the orifices into the inner shell when a heat-sensitive valve is opened. The valve is actuated by a heat sensing tube wrapped around the inner shell and which contains a liquid which expands to open the valve. This latter form of the invention is particularly useful where a nonwetting extinguishing agent is desired.

Still another embodiment of the invention illustrates how the container can be formed without the valve means. This form of the invention comprises inner and outer shells forming a closed chamber with orifices around the upper end of the inner shell. A ring and a downward extension in the chamber deliver the extinguishing solution from the chamber to the orifices. This embodiment also employs the concept of an expanding solution which responds to an abnormal temperature in the contents of the inner shell for discharging a spray through the orifices. This container is normally intended for use Where the container is not intended to be tilted during normal use so that the solution does not pour out of the orifices.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a receptacle having self-contained means for automatically extinguishing a fire in the contents of the receptacle.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a self-contained, self-extinguishing receptacle having a double walled construction forming a closed chamber for an extinguishing solution which responds to an abnormal temperature in any location within the receptacle by a pressure increase, and with valve means actuated in response to the pressure increase to control the discharge of the pressurized solution into the burning contents of the receptacle.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a self-extinguishing receptacle comprising inner and outer shells joined together to form a closed chamber with the bottom of the inner shell forming a diaphragm, the closed chamber being adapted to hold an extinguishing solution which increases in pressure upon a temperature increase within the inner shell and with valve means actuated by flexing of the diaphragm to open communication between the chamber and the interior of the inner shell for the discharge of the extinguishing solution.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will readily occur to one skilled in the art to which the invention pertains upon reference to the following detailed description.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The description refers to the accompanying drawing in which like reference characters refer to like parts throughout the several views and in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a self-contained, self-extinguishing receptacle illustrating the preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is an elevational sectional view through the receptacle of FIGURE 1 to illustrate the interior of the closed chamber;

FIGURE 3 is an elevational sectional view through another embodiment of the invention employing a pressurized gas as an extinguishing agent; and

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view through another embodiment of the invention which operates independently of valve means.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Now referring to FIGURES 1 and 2, a preferred container comprises an inner shell 12 and an outer shell 14 joined at their upper ends to define a closed chamber 16. The container 10 has an open top to define an article receiving opening 18.

The shells 12 and 14 are preferably formed of sheet metal or other heat-conductive material so that the walls of the inner shell 12 immediately reflect an abnormal temperature zone produced anywhere within the interior of the inner shell 12. The inner shell 12 also has a series of spaced orifices 20 formed adjacent the opening 18.

The outer shell 16 is provided with a threaded plug 22 which can be removed to substantially fill the chamber 16 with an extinguishing solution 24.

The solution 24 preferably takes the form of water having a rust-inhibiting agent. The walls of the inner and outer shells 12 and 14 are closely spaced from one another about a quarter of an inch so that the solution 24 immediately responds to a temperature increase reflected through the walls of the inner shell 12 by an increase in pressure in the chamber 16.

In order to deliver the solution 24 into the interior of the inner shell 12, a tubular ring 25 is mounted at the upper end of the chamber 16. The tubular ring 25 has a series of apertures in registry with the orifices 20. The ring 25 is joined to the wall of the inner shell 12 so that the solution is delivered to the orifices 20 by only the ring 25 from the chamber 16. A verticle extension 26 extends down from the ring 25 and has a lower end 28 closely spaced from the bottom of the chamber 16. The end 28 is adapted to receive the pressurized solution 24 and deliver it upwardly to the ring 25 where it is dis-- charged through the orifices 20 into the interior of the shell 12.

A valve member 30 carried by an arm 32 normally plugs the lower end 28 of the vertical extension. The inner end of the arm 32 is joined to the bottom 34 of the inner shell with its intermediate section being mounted 4 on a downwardly depending support 36. The arm'32 is arranged so that it pivots about the support 36 from a normal position where the valve 30 closes the lower end 28 and a second position wherein the open end 28 is so that the extinguishing solution can rise in the vertical tube.

The bottom 34 of the inner shell has a predetermined thickness so that it flexes when the pressure in the chamber 16 increases due to an abnormal temperature rise. As can best be seen in FIGURE 2, the bottom 34 acts as a diaphragm so that it bulges upwardly due to this pressure increase. When the bottom flexes, the inner end of the arm 32 pivots about the support 36 so that the valve 30 moves downwardly away from the bottom 28 of the vertical tube.

In operation, the valve 30 is normally in a closed position, with the solution 24 substantially filling the container 16. A fire in any location within the inner shell 12 produces an abnormal temperature rise which is reflected in the nearest portion of the wall of the shell 12. This temperature rise causes the solution 24 to immediately produce an increase in pressure within the chamber 16. This increase in pressure causes the bottom 34 to flex upwardly thereby pivoting the arm 32 and opening the valve 30. The pressurized solution then forces itself up through the vertical tube 26, into the ring 25 and out through the orifices 20 in the form of a spray. The spray falls on the burning contents of the inner shell to extinguish them.

It is to be noted that by supporting the tube 26 so that its lower end 28 is disposed adjacent the bottom of the chamber, provides a significant advantage. If the solution 24 should be at a relatively low level, a pressure increase in the chamber 16 will still force the extinguishing solution at the bottom of the chamber up through the tube 26. In addition, if the temperature increase should be such that the solution tends to vaporize, the vapor will be at the upper end of thechamber 16 so that the liquid at the lower portion of the chamber 16 is forced upwardly through the vertical tube 26.

It is therefore to be further noted that by employing the bottom of the inner shell 12 as a diaphragm means for opening the valve 30 in response to a pressure increase caused by an abnormal temperature condition, a self-actuating means is provided in a relatively simple and reliable structure.

Now referring to FIGURE 3, a second container is shown which like the embodiment of FIGURE 2 comprises an inner shell 102 and an outer shell 104 joined together at their upper ends to form a closed chamber 106. The shell 102 has walls made of a suitable heatconductive material.

A tubular ring 108 is mounted at the upper end of the chamber 106 adjacent the upper open end 110 of the container and has perforations in registry with a series of orifices 1.12 in the inner shell 102. The orifices 112 provide means for directing an extinguishing fluid into the interior of the inner shell 102.

The ring 108 has a downward extension 114 which terminates in a normally-closed valve 116. The valve 116 is preferably mounted on the bottom of the inner shell 102 and is connected through a union .118 to a pressurized cylinder of carbon dioxide gas 120.

The cylinder 120 is mounted by a pair of clips 122 in a recessed portion 124 in the bottom of the container. The union 118 permits the carbon dioxide cylinder to be replaced after its contents have been exhausted in extinguishing a fire.

The valve 116 is controlled by an elongated, closed tubular sensing element 126 which is wrapped around the wall of the inner shell so that it senses an abnormal temperature in any location within the inner shell. The tubular element 126 is connected to the valve and contains a liquid such as mercury which reacts to a temperature increase by expanding with a force sufficient to open the valve 116. Heat sensitive valves of this character are well known to those skilled in the art.

Thus it can be seen that the embodiment of FIGURE 3 is similar to the embodiment of FIGURES 1 and 2 in that means in contact with the inner shell sense an abnormal temperature rise produced by a fire zone in the contents of the inner shell to open valve means so that communication is opened between a source of an extinguishing solution and the ring at the upper end of the container. The extinguishing solution is delivered to the ring and discharges through the orifices into the interior of the inner shell.

FIGURE 4 shows another embodiment of the invention in the form of a container 200 which illustrates how the present invention can be employed without the valve means for controlling the discharge of the extinguishing solution into the interior of the container. Container 200 comprises an outer shell 202 and an inner shell 204 which are closely spaced from one another and joined to form a substantially closed chamber 206. A plug 208 in the outer shell provides means for pouring an extinguishing solution such as water having an anti-rust agent into the chamber 206.

The inner shell has a series of orifices 208 around its upper open end. A perforated, tubular ring 210 is mounted in the chamber adjacent the orifices 208 and provides means for delivering the extinguishing solution to the orifices from the chamber. A downwardly directed tubular extension 212 extends from the ring 210 and terminates with a lower open end 214 closely adjacent the bottom of the chamber. The inner shell 204 like the embodiment of FIGURES 1 and 2 is formed of a heat conductive material so that a fire zone in the contents of the container produces a temperature rise in the solution 216 in the chamber which responds to the temperature rise by a pressure increase. When this pressure increase reaches a predetermined level, the solution is forced up the tubular member 212 into the ring 210 and is discharged through the orifices 208 in the form of a spray.

The embodiment of FIGURE 4 is intended to be employed where the container is not normally tilted from an upright position. Because this container has a tendency to permit the solution to pour out of the orifices when it is tipped, the embodiment of FIGURES 1 and 2 demonstrate how the invention can be utilized in a portable embodiment which can be tipped without losing the extinguishing solution.

It can therefore be seen that I have described in detail a novel, self-contained, self-extinguishing receptacle for extinguishing the burning contents of an unattended container for holding waste or other combustible materials. The preferred container, in addition to being lightweight so that it readily lends itself to a portable embodiment, is formed of a few inexpensively manufactured components. The container has a self-contained fluid source which is discharged into the interior of the container when an abnormal temperature is sensed.

It is to be understood that although I have described three embodiments of my invention, that various changes and revisions can be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention as expressed in the scope of the appended claims.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A self-extinguishing receptacle, comprising:

(a) a container comprising an inner shell and an outer shell joined together to form a closed chamber between the walls of said shells, said container being formed with an article-receiving opening providing access into the interior of said inner shell, said inner shell having a heat-conductive wall forming a side of said closed chamber for the transfer of heat from a fire zone in the interior of said inner shell, and said inner shell having a series of orifices directed toward the interior of said inner shell for the discharge of an extinguishing fluid under pressure;

(b) a source of an extinguishing fluid mounted on said container;

(0) conduit means providing a fluid connection between said source of extinguishing fluid and said orifices;

(d) a normally closed valve means in said conduit means; and

(e) heat-sensitive means for opening said normally closed valve means in response to a temperature increase in said heat-conductive wall caused by a fire zone in said inner shell so that said extinguishing fluid discharges through said orifices.

2. The invention as defined in claim 1, wherein said source of extinguishing fluid comprises a container of carbon dioxide under pressure.

3. The invention as defined in claim 1, wherein said extinguishing fluid comprises a liquid solution in said closed chamber capable of producing a pressure increase in said chamber when said heat-conductive wall transfers heat from a fire zone in said inner shell to said chamber.

4. The invention as defined in claim 3, wherein said normally closed valve means comprises a valve member supported for movement between open and closed positions, and including a diaphragm member having one side exposed to the pressure in said chamber, said diaphragm member being capable of flexing from a first position associated with the normal pressure in said chamber toward a second position in a motion produced by a predetermined pressure increase in said chamber, and an arm connecting said diaphragm member to said valve member so that said predetermined pressure increase in said chamber opens said valve member to permit the fluid in said chamber under the influence of said predetermined pressure to discharge through said orifices into the interior of said inner shell.

5. The invention as defined in claim 4, wherein said diaphragm member comprises a wall of said inner shell.

6. The invention as defined in claim 5, wherein said inner and outer shells are formed of a sheet metal and said extinguishing fluid comprises an extinguishing solution with a rust-inhibiting agent.

7. The invention as defined in claim 1, wherein said inner shell has a flexible bottom and upwardly directed sidewalls joined to said bottom and said outer shell comprises an outer bottom and upwardly directed sidewalls outwardly spaced from the bottom and sidewalls of said inner shell, the bottom and sidewalls of said inner shell being formed of a heat-conductive material, the upper ends of said inner and outer shells being joined to form an open top permitting access into the interior of said inner shell, said orifices being formed in said inner shell adjacent said open top, and said conduit means comprise an elongated tube having a generally ring-shaped portion mounted between the sidewalls of said shells adjacent said open top, said ring-shaped portion having apertures in registry with said orifices for the discharge of solution delivered under pressure to said ring-shaped portion, said conduit means further including a vertical downward extension between said ring-shaped portion and the bottom of said chamber, said vertical extension having a bottom end for receiving a solution under pressure from said chamber, said valve means comprising a valve member supported for movement toward and away from the bottom end of said vertical extension to open and close communication between said chamber and said vertical extension, the flexible bottom of said inner shell being capable of flexing from a first position to a second position when a solution in said chamber expands under the influence of heat transferred from a fire zone in said inner shell through the walls of said inner shell, and including an arm in said chamber providing a motion-transmitting connection between said valve member and said flexible bottom so that said valve member opens communication between said chamber and said vertical extension when said flexible bottom flexes due to a predetermined in- (c) a fluid in said fluid chamber capable of expanding crease in heat in the solution in 'said chamber. under the influence of heat transferred through the '--8. A self-extinguishing receptacle, comprising: wall of said inner shell and discharging through (a) a container comprising an inner shell and an outer said conduit means and said orifices into the interior shell'joined together to form a fluid chamber be- 5 of said inner shell. tween said shells, said container having an articlereceiving opening providing access into the interior References Cited of sand 111116! shell, said mner shell hav ng a heat- UNITED STATES PATENTS conductive wall forming a s1de of said fluid chamber v for the transfer-of heat from a fire zone in the inter- 1O 1882537 10/1932 Whltsltt, 169 2 ior of said inner shell and a series oforifices directed 2387526 9/1945 Blake 169*2. towardthe interior of said inner shell for the dis- 10/1968 Davls 16926 X charge of an extinguishing fluid under pressure, said orifices being formed above the normal level of fluid ROBERT REEVES Primary Examiner in said fluid chamber; 5 N. L. STACK, JR., Assistant Examiner (b) conduit means in said fluid chamber for delivering an extinguishing fluid from said fluid chamber to US. Cl. X.R.

said orifices; and 169-2

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1882537 *May 4, 1931Oct 11, 1932Whitsitt William BAir conditioning apparatus for passenger cars
US2387526 *May 19, 1943Oct 23, 1945Curtiss Wright CorpAirplane
US3407880 *Nov 25, 1966Oct 29, 1968Charles B. DavisFire extinguisher utilizing products of combustion
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4250967 *Sep 6, 1979Feb 17, 1981Joseph M. GeremiaSafety trash container having a movable closure and an extinguishant
US4411318 *Jul 22, 1981Oct 25, 1983Walter ZeischeggFire-extinguishing waste receptacle
US5056603 *Mar 5, 1990Oct 15, 1991W.R. Parkinson Co., Inc.Fire resistant container having both active and passive protection
US7070003Feb 2, 2004Jul 4, 2006Smith Linda MCanister fire extinguishing assembly
DE3027813A1 *Jul 23, 1980Feb 11, 1982Hefendehl Hans FriedrichSelbstloeschender, oben offener abfallbehaelter, insbesondere papierkorb
DE3902600A1 *Jan 28, 1989Aug 9, 1990Wilhelm BodenschatzFire-extinguishing packing
Classifications
U.S. Classification169/26, 169/56
International ClassificationA24F19/14, A24F19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA24F19/145
European ClassificationA24F19/14B