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Publication numberUS3489628 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 13, 1970
Filing dateJul 22, 1966
Priority dateJul 22, 1966
Publication numberUS 3489628 A, US 3489628A, US-A-3489628, US3489628 A, US3489628A
InventorsRobert W Catzen
Original AssigneeRobert W Catzen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Web splicing method and apparatus
US 3489628 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 13, 1970 w. CATZEN WEB SPLICING METHOD AND APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 22, 1966 INVENTOR. ROBERT W. 04 725A! BY a 9 ATTORNEYS Jan. 13, 1970 R. w. CATZEN WEB SPLICING METHOD AND APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 22, 1966 INVENTOR- ROBERT W. 64725 A TTOE/VEXS Jan. 13, 1970 R. w. CATZEN WEB SPLIGING METHOD AND APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed July 22, 1966 IN VEN TOR. ROBERT 14/. CATZE/v/ ATTOIQA/EYS United States Patent 3,489,628 WEB SPLICING METHOD AND APPARATUS Robert W. Catzen, Light St., Baltimore, Md. 21202 Filed July 22, 1966, Ser. No. 567,271 Int. Cl. B31f 5/00; G03d /04; B65h 39/16 US. Cl. 156159 11 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A method and apparatus by which there is attached to a first continuously moving web of material a second web of material, preferably at a time just before said first web of material is expended. The first web is guided by rollers to move continuously past, but out of contact with, an adhesive applying means. The second web is likewise arranged to be guided by rollers past, but out of contact with, said adhesive applying means. Selectively operable means are provided to move either said first or second webs of material into contact with said adhesive applying means.

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for splicing webs of sheet material, and in particular, it relates to a method and apparatus which enables a second continuous web of material to be attached to a continuous first web of material which is feeding forwardly, without the necessity of interrupting the forward feeding operation.

The method and apparatus of the present invention finds particular utility in the field of paper box manufacturing and specifically, the corrugated type of paper box. Those familiar with the corrugated carton or box manufacturing techniques will appreciate that the corrugating medium utilized to fabricate the boxes is fed continuously to a single facer. When one roll of corrugating medium is nearly exhausted, it then becomes necessary to supply a new roll of corrugating medium and to then splice the leading edge of this new roll onto the already feeding web of corrugating medium. In the past, manual splicing techniques have been used, but such techniques did not prove wholly satisfactory since the overlapped or spliced portion behind where the leading edge of the new web attached to the trailing edge of the old web did not receive a proper coating of adhesive, and the overlapping portions thus did not properly adhere to one another. Naturally, while the webs are constantly feeding, and the material is being constantly fabricated, it is extremely difficult to detect whether or not the splice is a proper one, and as a result, improperly spliced joints often went undetected. Then, if the splice came apart while the material was feeding through the production equipment during formation of a container, the result was that such equipment would becom jammed and inoperative. However, even if such an improper splice managed to get through the production equipment, the carton or container which was fabricated with this improperly spliced material would be unsatisfactory and would be unusable by a customer.

It should, however, be appreciated that while the present invention finds particular utility as a paper splicer for the corrugated box industry, as mentioned hereinabove, it is in no way limited to this particular field. Rather, the invention finds applicability and utility in any environment where a web of continuous sheet material is being forwardly fed from a supply roll thereof. When the supply roll of sheet material becomes depleted and nearly exhausted, it is apparent that anew roll of sheet material must be provided. Naturally, if one can stop the feeding of the first web of material, there is no problem in properly splicing the new web thereonto. However, in most instances, and particularly in those instances where the web is being used in a continuous production or manufacturing operation, it is extremely undesirable to interrupt or stop the feeding of the web in order to splice the new web thereonto. Thus, the difficulty arises in attempting to splice or attach the new sheet or web of material onto the old sheet or web thereof, without interrupting the feeding of the old web of material.

Still another factor to consider in a splicing arrangement is the length of the splice, which, under ideal conditions should be as short as possible. This can better be understood by recognizing that the initial web of material has a given thickness, and that the new roll of web material to be spliced thereonto has the same thickness. However, at that point where the leading edge of the new web attaches to the trailing edge of the old web, there is an overlapping of the webs, and thus the thickness in this area becomes at least double the normal thickness of each individual web. Because of this fact, it is desirable that the length of overlap be minimized, to thereby assure that the distance where the web is of double thickness will be as short as possible. Nevertheless, while it is desirable to keep the length of the splice to a minimum, this factor must be balanced against the need for assuring that the two webs are firmly attached together and will not subsequently come apart.

There have, of course, been various prior art splicing devices and techniques, but for the most part, these prior art arrangements have proved unsatisfactory, particularly for use in the corrugated box industry. The most common type of prior art equipment has been the butt splicer, a device wherein two web strips were butted together in end-to-end position and wherein a piece of tape was placed across the top of the butt. A few prior art devices attempted to create an overlapping type of splice, such as is accomplished by the present invention, but all prior art devices whether of the butt splice type or of the overlapping splice type have been extremely complicated arrangements, which were quite expensive to purchase and which required constant maintenance, adjustment and repair. Also, such prior art splicing devices required that the webs feed therethrough in a complicated and tortuous path, and it thus took considerable time and effort to properly thread the webs through the splicing device. Furthermore, certain of the rior art splicing devices attempted to temporarily stop or interrupt the feeding of a web in order to accomplish the splicing, and thus great strain and tensile pres sure were created upon the web once the feeding started again. In some instances, this resulted in a weakening or actual tearing of the web itself, whil in other instances, it caused a partial or complete separation of the splice. Also, stopping during production frequently created waste. Finally, some of these prior art arrangements could not satisfactorily attach the webs together except with a long splice, rather than the desired short splice which is preferred for reasons set forth hereinabove. If these prior art arrangements attempted to accomplish or achieve the desired short splice, they often had to resort to the use of transversely extending sealing tapes extending across the splice.

With the foregoing factors firmly in mind, it is, therefore, an object of the present invention to overcome the difficulties, deficiencies and shortcomings associated with prior art splicing techniques and arrangements, and to provide in their stead, an improved web splicing method and apparatus.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a method and apparatus for splicing a new web of sheet material onto a feeding web of sheet material without interrupting or even slowing down the feeding operation.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a web splicing method and apparatus which can be continually operated to splice a second web to a first feeding web When the first web is nearly exhausted, to then attach a third web to the second feeding web when that web is nearly exhausted, and so on.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a splicing device for webs of sheet material, which device is relatively simple and inexpensive to produce, yet which can provide the desired splicing operation; which does not require continuous maintenance or readjustment; and into which the webs of sheet material can be readily introduced.

Another object of the present invention is to prevent bleed of the adhesive material beyond the splice to assure that such adhesive material does not get into the corrugating roll or stick to other parts of the machinery.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved web splicing method and apparatus which adhesively splices two webs of sheet material together with the adhesive extending the full length of the splice to assure its strength and integrity, yet wherein the length of the splice is kept to a minimum.

' Other objects, advantages and salient features of th present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description which, taken in conjunction with the annexed drawings, discloses a preferred embodiment hereof.

Referring to the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of a splicing apparatus in accordance with the principles of the present invention, and which can accomplish the novel series of steps included in the method set forth herein;

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 22 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 33 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a schematic view showing, in steps (a) through (d), the sequential operation of the present invention to splice web B onto web A; and

FIGURE 5 is a schematic view, identical to FIGURE 4, but showing the sequential operation for splicing web A onto web B.

At the outset, it should be understood that the apparatus generally designated is shown in FIGURE 1 in a position which is never present during operation. That is, as will be explained hereinafter, various parts of the apparatus 10 are movably mounted, in that they are coupled to extensible cylinder and piston means which can be selectively moved from a retracted position to an extended position. In FIGURE 1, all of the parts are shown in fully extended position, but such showing is only for purposes of illustration and for ease of under standing of the invention. It will, nevertheless, be appreciated after reading the following detailed description that when the apparatus 10 is operating, the parts thereof will never all be in the 'fully extended positions shown in FIGURE 1.

Before going on to describe the details of the apparatus 10, it will be noted from FIGURE 1 that such apparatus is juxtaposed in spaced relation to a roller generally designated 12 which does not necessarily form a part of the splicing apparatus itself. Rather, the roller 12 can form a part of the feeding rolls or production equipment to which the Web of sheet material feeds. The roller 12 can be a plain idler, which, in cooperation with another roll forms a nip. However, in the preferred form of the invention, as used in the corrugated container industry, the roller 12 is heated, since the adhesive material is generally of the heat sensitive type. Two continuous webs of sheet material are shown in FIGURE 1, such webs being identified as A and B, and it will be seen that these webs pass through the splicing apparatus 10 and then feed forwardly over or across the heated roller 12. As aforesaid, the webs themselves can be fabricated of virtually any desired sheet material. Each web is initially supplied in the form of a large supply roll, and the web material thus pays off linearly from such supply roll to feed forwardly through the splicing apparatus, over the heated roller 12 and then onward to the production equipment wherein it is further processed or fabricated. Although FIGURE 1 shows both the web A and the web B feeding through the apparatus 10 and over the roller 12, it will be understood that in the normal instance, only one such web would be present. That is, when the web A is feeding from its supply roll across the roller 12 and onto the fabricating or production equipment, the web B is not even utilized. However, as the material of web A starts to run out, i.e, the supply roll becomes exhausted, then a new roll of sheet material must be provided, such roll of sheet material forming the web B. The apparatus 10 thus serves to splice this new web B onto the already feeding web A. When the splicing operation has been completed, it will be the web B alone that feeds through the apparatus, over the heated roller 12 and onwardly to the production or fabricating equipment. Then, as the web B starts to run out or become exhausted, another new supply roll must be provided, such supply roll providing the web A. Then, the web A is spliced onto the already feeding web B, and the operation continues. It will thus be apparent that the apparatus 10 must be adaptable to splice the web B onto the web A, and alternatively, to splice the web A onto the web 13.

Referring again to FIGURE 1, and also to FIGURE 2, it will be noted that the apparatus 10 can be satisfactorily supported from existing ceiling bridge beams 14. Although only one such beam is shown in FIGURE 1, it will be understood that the apparatus 10 is supported from two such beams, which are spaced apart in parallel relationship. A supporting framework generally designated 16 is provided for mounting the apparatus and for attaching the same to the beams 14. The framework 16 includes four spaced apart upstanding channels 18, arranged in a manner as can best be seen in FIGURE 2. Screw means 20 adjustably secure these channels to the beams 14 thereby serving to support the framework 16 and simultaneously enabling the same to be adjusted relatively to the beams 14, if desired. The lower end of the channels 18 are connected by channels 22 extending in a parallel relationship to the beams 14 and by channels 24 extending in a perpendicular relationship to the beams 14. Intermediate channels 26 are also provided to extend between the channels 18 in spaced parallel relationship intermediate the ceiling beams 14 and the lower channels 22. If desired, and in order to rigidify the framework 18, transversely extending channels 28 may be provided to extend betweenthe channels '26.

A coating roller or adhesive applying roller means generally designated 30 is centrally disposed upon the supporting framework 16 as can best be seen in FIGURES 1 and 2. The coating roll means 30 includes a generally cylindrical adhesive applying roller 32 having projecting end shafts 34 which are suitably journalled within pillow blocks 36 supported upon the bottom channels 22. An adhesive pan or reservoir 38 extends beneath the roller 32 in such a manner that at least a portion of the roller passes through the adhesive material contained within the reservoir 38. Thus, as the roller 32 rotates, its peripheral surface picks up a coating of adhesive and ultimately transfers the same onto a web which is brought into contact therewith.

In order to properly drive the rotatably mounted adhesive applying roller 32, a reversible motor means 40 is provided, such motor means being coupled through a coupling 42 to one end shaft 34 on the roller 32. As shown in FIGURE 2, the bottom channels 24 can extend outwardly for a short distance beyond one bottom channel 22, and another channel 44 can extend across these projecting ends thereof to serve as a mounting means for the reversible driving motor 40.

Various rollers are provided on the device 10, in a manner to be presently described, with such rollers being mounted for both rotational movement and reciprocal or linear movement. This linear movement is effectuated by an extensible cylinder and piston means generally designated 46. In the preferred embodiment, this cylinder and piston means is an air cylinder having a piston rod coupled to the roller bearings in a manner to be presently described. However, it will be understood that other suitable extensible actuating means, such as hydraulic cylinders or electromechanical mechanisms can likewise be utilized.

As a typical example of the operation of the extensible means 46, and its manner of coaction with the rollers of the device 10, let attention first be directed to the feeding roller means for the web B, such roller means being generally designated 48. This feeding roller means 48, as best shown in FIGURE 2, includes a cylindrical roller 50 having projecting end shafts 52 thereon. The peripheral surface of the roller 50 is formed by a layer of rubber or plastic 54 which is vulcanized or glued in place. Each end shaft 52 is journalled in a bearing 56 carried upon a carriage 58. Slots or grooves are provided in the opposed sides 60 of the carriage 58, to thereby enable the same to ride along spaced rails 62 extending perpendicularly from the channels 18. The rails 62 project inwardly toward one another from supporting plates 64, and an end plate 66 is provided at the ends of the rails and plates, in parallel disposition to the channels 18, to thereby limit travel of the carriage 58 and to simultaneously strengthen and rigidify the rail structure. A spacer 68 may be provided between the lowermost plate 64 and the channel 22, as shown in FIGURE 1.

The extensible cylinder and piston means 46 includes a cylinder body 70 extending outside the framework 16, and being attached to one of the channels 18 by a mounting plate 72. The piston rod 74 extends through a suitable opening in the channel 18 and connects with the end of the carriage 58 in the manner shown in FIG- URE 1.

A suitable actuating or control means, not shown, is coupled to the cylinder 70 to selectively energize and deenergize the same. In other words, when fluid pressure is applied to the cylinder 70, the piston rod 74 extends outwardly therefrom, thus moving the attached carriage 58 to the extended position shown in FIGURE 1. On the other hand, when fluid pressure is released from the cylinder 70, the piston rod 74 retracts back into the cylinder, thereby moving the carriage 58 toward the channels 18. As can best be seen in FIGURE 2, one carriage and rail system is provided at each end of the feeding roller means 48, and accordingly, one actuating cylinder is likewise provided at each side thereof. The two actuating cylinders connected to the roll means 48 act in unison, and thus, they cooperatively serve to move the roll means 48 in a linear path between an extended position, as shown in FIGURE 1, and a retracted position.

Another feeding roller means must be provided for feeding the web A, and this feeding roller means is generally designated 76, as can best be seen in FIGURES 1 and 3. This feeding roller means includes a cylindrical roller 78, similar to the roller 50, and having projecting end shaft 80 thereupon. The peripheral surface of the roller 78 is covered with a layer of rubber 82 which is vulcanized thereonto. The end shafts 80 are suitably journalled in pillow blocks 84 supported upon short channel pieces 86 which extend in upstanding relationship from the channels 26.

It will be noted that the feeding roller means 48 for the web B is disposed on one side of the coating roller means 30, while the feeding roller means 76 for the web A is disposed at least partially on the other side thereof. Thus, as shown in FIGURE 1, when the webs A and B feed through the splicing apparatus and pass to the heated roller 12, one web passes on one side of the adhesive applying roller 30 and the other web passes on the other side thereof.

An extensible roll means generally designated 88 is provided in spaced parallel relationship to the feeding roll means 48, but on the opposite side of the adhesive applying roller means 30. The roller means 88 includes a cylindrical roller 90 having end shafts 92 extending therefrom. These end shafts 92 are journalled in bearings 56 carried by a carriage 58 identical with that previously described. The carriage, in turn, is supported and movable upon rails 62 in the same manner as was previously described in connection with the feeding roll means 48. Also, the cylinder 70 and piston rod 74 are coupled to the carriage 58 in the same manner to effect linear movement in the same way. The only difference between the carriage and extensible actuating means for driving the roll means 88 and that for driving the feeding roll means 48, resides in the fact that the mounting plate 72 for the roll means 88 does not connect to the channel 18. Instead, it is spaced inwardly therefrom by spacers 94 and is attached to a plate 96 coupled to the outboard end of the rail 62 and plate 64.

In addition to the foregoing structure, cutter means are provided in juxtaposition to each of the web feeding rolls. That cutter means juxtaposed to the feeding roll means 48 is generally designated 98, while that cutter means juxtaposed to the feeding roll means 76 is generally designated 100. However, it will be understood that the cutter means 98 and 100 are identical in construction. As can best be seen in FIGURE 3, each includes a cylindrical roller 102 having projecting end shafts 104. A cutting blade or rule die blade 106 is mounted on the roller 102 to project slightly beyond its peripheral surface. Preferably, the distance that the rule die 106 extends beyond the surface of the roller 102 can be adjusted by means of set screws, thereby enabling some adjustment depending upon the thickness of the web material feeding through the apparatus.

Each cutting roller 102 has its end shafts 104 journalled in bearings 56 carried by carriages 58, such as those previously described. As can be seen in FIGURE 1, for the cutter means 98, the rails 62 extend generally perpendicularly to the rails utilized for the feeding roller 48, and the end plate 66 for the cutter means is supported upon the upper plate 64 for the feeding roller. For the cutter means 98, the cylinder 70 is attached by the plate 72 to the intermediate channel 26, rather than to the side channel 18. As such, the linear movement of the cutter means 98 is perpendicular to the path of linear movement of the feeding roll 48. However, when the feeding roll 48 is in its fully extended position, the same is directly aligned with the axis of rotation of the cutter means 98. Then, the cutter means 98 can be moved to its extended position, as shown in FIGURE 1, or alternatively, can be moved to its retracted position whereat the roller 102 is raised away from the feeding roller 50.

The cutter means 100 is provided with mounting carriages and actuating cylinders disposed and connected in a manner identical with that described in connection with the feeding roller 48. The only difference, of course, is that spacers 68 are provided on the intermediate channels 26 rather than upon the bottom channels 22. The height of these spacers 68' is selected to assure that the central axis or axis of rotation of the cutter roll 102 is coplanar with the central axis or axis of rotation of the feeding roller means 76. As such, the cutter means 100 is movable between its extended position, as shown in FIGURE 1, and a retracted position where the cutter roll 102 is drawn linearly away from the feeding roll means 76.

To appreciate the operation of the present invention, let attention he directed to FIGURE 4, and particularly to FIGURE 4(a). In this figure, all of the movable parts of the device 10 are shown in their retracted position. As was initially explained, while all of the parts were shown in FIGURE 1 in their extended position, this is not the usual position for the parts. Instead, except when a splicing operation is to be performed, all of the linearly movable parts are in their retracted positions, as shown in FIGURE 4(a). By referring to such figure, it will be noted that the web A is feeding through the splicing apparatus 10 and forwardly past the heated roller 12. The only roller or roll means which the web A contacts during its transit through the apparatus 10 is the feeding roll means 76. In other words, as can be seen, once the web A passes the surface of the roller 76, it feeds linearly directly to the heated roller 12, and does not ordinarily contact any other roll means. In particular, it is important to note that the web A normally does not contact the roller 32 of the adhesiveapplying roll means 30.

FIGURE 4 is intended to schematically illustrate the condition when the supply roll for the Web A is nearly exhausted. Of course, when this occurs, it becomes necessary to provide a new and full supply roll of the web material B, and the device 10 must then be utilized to splice the web B to the already feeding web A. To accomplish this, the supply roll of web material B is placed in position, and the leading edge thereof, designated L, is introduced in the direction of the arrows toward the device 10. Simultaneously, the motor 40 is actuated to drive the coating roll means 30 at a selected speed in a counterclockwise direction. Once the leading edge L on the web B reaches the feeding roll means 48, the cylinders 70 associated therewith are actuated to move the feeding roller 50 from its retracted position of FIGURE 4(a) to its extended position of FIGURE 4(b). The leading edge L and the material of web B following thereafter thus contact the peripheral surface of the adhesive-applying roller 32 and an adhesive coating is thereby imparted onto one surface of the web B. The leading edge L is then fed downwardly in the direction of the arrow in FIGURE 4(1)), by a manual or other feeding technique, and is thus brought into contact with the surface of the web A at a point of tallgency on the heated roller 12. When such contact is made, the splice is begun, and the heat from the roll 12 merely assures that there will be a satisfactory adhesive bond between the webs A and B. Thus, as the web A continues to feed around the roller 12 and on to the fabricating or production equipment, it necessarily carries its adhesively-attached web B.

As soon as the leading edge has been attached in the manner just described, the parts of the apparatus 10 are moved from the position of FIGURE 4(b) to that of. FIGURE 4(0). That is, the roller 50 is moved back to its initial or retracted position, thus moving the web B out of contact with the adhesive-applying roller 32. Substantially simultaneously, the roller means 88 is moved from its retracted to its extended position, thus bringing the roller 90 into contact with one surface of the web A to force the other surface thereof into contact with the periphery of the adhesive-applying roller 32. Thus, as the roller 32 rotates in the counterclockwise direction indicated, an adhesive coating is applied to the contacting surface of the web A.

Also simultaneously, the cutter means 100 is actuated to move the cutting roller 102 forwardly to its extended position thereby causing the rule die or blade 106 to coact with the feeding roller 78 and thus sever the Web A. This creates a trailing edge on the web A, such trailing edge being designated T.

While for ease of illustration, the distance which the rule die 106 extends beyond the peripheral surface of the roller 102 has been'somewhat exaggerated, it will be appreciated that in actual practice this distance is extremely small, something in the neighborhood of /s inch. Thus, the rollers 78 and 102 are brought together to form a nip for the feeding web A, and as the web feeds through this nip, it causes the roller 102 to rotate. When, during such rotation, the rule die 106 reaches the nip, it cuts through the web A and projects a very slight distance into the rubber coating 82 on the surface of the roller 78. This cutting creates a trailing edge T on the web A.

As soon as the trailing edge T on the web A has passed the coating roller 32 and has received an adhesive coating, the cutter means 100 is moved back to its retracted position, as is the roller means 88. This is shown in 8 FIGURE 4(d). Also, at this time, the motor 40 can be slowed down, thereby slowing the rotation of the adhesiveapplying roller 32 to a slow idle. The adhesively-coated trailing edge T thus passes downward and around the heated roll 12, and accordingly, is suitably attached or laminated to the web B. Once the trailing edge T has been attached in this manner, the splice has been completed, and it is now the web B which continues to feed past the roller 12 and to the fabricating or production equipment.

To carry the process even one step further, and to explain the reverse technique or operation of the apparatus 10, let attention he directed to FIGURE 5 and particularly to FIGURE 5(a). This figure shows the web B continuously feeding through the apparatus 10, just as it did in FIGURE 4(d). However, after the web B has been fed for some time, the supply thereof becomes exhausted and it is thus necessary to replenish the same with a new supply roll A. In other words, FIGURE 5 depicts the manner in which the new web A is spliced onto the already feeding web B. Again, as shown in FIGURE 5(a), while the web B is normally feeding and before a splicing operation takes place, all parts of the apparatus 10 are in their retracted position. The leading edge L on the web A is fed in the direction of the arrow in FIG- URE 5(a), is wrapped around the feeding roll mean-s 76 and is fed downwardly toward the adhesive-applying roll means 30.

Then, the motor 40 is energized to drive the adhesiveapplying roller 32 in a clockwise direction as indicated in FIGURE 5(b) and the roll means 88 is moved from its retracted to its extended position. The leading edge L on the web A is then fed downwardly, in the manner shown in FIGURE 5(1)), past the surface of the roller 90 and in contact with the surface of the adhesive-applying roller 32, and then downwardly in the direction of the arrow to meet the web B at a point of tangency along the heated roll 12. Due to the contact with the rotating adhesiveapplying roller 32, one surface of the leading edge of the web A and that portion of the web following the same are provided with an adhesive coating. It is this coating which serves to attach or laminate the webs A and B together as the same pass across the heated roller 12. Thus, when the leading edge L becomes so attached, the splice is begun.

Then, in a substantially simultaneous manner, the parts move from the position shown in FIGURE 5 (b) to the position shown in FIGURE 5(0). That is, the roll means 88 moves back to its retracted position, thereby assuring that the web A no longer contacts the adhesive-applying roller 32, and instead, feeds linearly in an uninterrupted manner from its feeding roll 76 to the heated roll 12. Also, the feeding roll means 48 is advanced from its retracted position to an extended position thereby moving one surface of the web B into contact with a surface of the adhesive-applying roller 32. Thus, an adhesive coating is applied to one surface of the web B. Also substantially simultaneously, the cutter means 98 is actuated, moving the same downwardly so that the coaction between the rule die 106 and the surface of the feeding roller 50 serves to sever the web B, thereby creating a trailing edge T thereon. Once this surface T has passed the adhesiveapplying roller 32 and has received its adhesive coating, the cutter means 98 and the feeding means 48 can again be retracted, as shown in FIGURE 5 (d), and the motor 40 can be de-energized, thereby terminating rotation of the adhesive-applying roller 32. Once the trailing edge T passes the heated roller 12 and is laminated or attached to the web A, the splice has been completed and only the web A is feeding to the equipment.

In view of the foregoing description of the operation of the method and apparatus of the present invention, certain advantageous features should become apparent. For instance, the present invention assures that a continuous film of adhesive is applied during the splicing operation. This is important since, in the present invention,

there is no overlap of adhesive, as there would be if the adhesive were simultaneously applied to both the new web and the depleting old web. Thus, the present invention must assure that there is no space where no adhesive is present, since such an unadhered space would create problems. Also, an important aspect of the present invention resides in the selective reversal of the adhesive roll motor when splicing to each of the different webs. Further, through careful timing and positioning of the splice, it is assured that the adhesive material will not bleed beyond the splice and there will be no tendency for the web to become glued to parts of the machine. Finally, with regard to the heated roller 12, it must again be emphasized that this expedient is useful in instances where heat-sensitive adhesive is used, but in other instances, a conventional nip would work equally well for engaging the old and new webs together.

After reading the foregoing detailed description, it should be apparent that the objects set forth at the outset of the specification have been successfully achieved by the present invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A method of splicing a second continuous web of material to a first continuous web of material which is feeding forwardly past a roller means, said method comprising the steps of:

continuously feeding said first web of material past said roller means;

passing the leading edge of said second web over a feed roller spaced from said roller means;

providing an adhesive applying roller in spaced relation between said feed roller and said feeding first web; moving said feed roller from its initial position and relatively toward said adhesive applying roller, thereby bringing said leading edge of said second Web into contact with one side of said adhesive applying roller to thereby adhesively coat one surface of said second web; feeding said second web to said roller means and applying said coated surface of said second web to said continuously feeding first web at said roller means to thereby adhesively attach said first and second webs together; moving said continuously feeding first web relatively toward said adhesive applying roller to thus cause a surface thereof to receive an adhesive coating;

substantially simultaneously with moving of said first web into contact with said adhesive applying roller, moving said feed roller back to its initial position thereby moving said second web out of contact with said adhesive applying roller;

severing said first web to create a trailing edge thereupon;

said trailing edge eventually being adhesively attached to said second web during passage along said roller means.

2. A method as defined in claim 1 wherein said step of moving said first web of material includes bringing the same into contact with said adhesive-applying roller on the side thereof opposite to that side contacted by said second web of material.

3. A method as defined in claim 1 further including the step of positively rotating said adhesive-applying roller in a selected direction to apply said adhesive initially to such second web of material and then to said first web of material.

4. An apparatus for splicing a second continuous web of material to a first continuous web of material which is being moved continuously forward to a point of use beyond a heated roller means without interrupting movement of said first continuous Web of material which comprises:

a coating roller means adapted to apply a fluid-like adhesive coating to a surface of a web of material when said surface is brought into contact with said coating means and continuously advanced in contact therewith;

first and second feeding rollers over which said first and second webs of material are respectively arranged to pass and caused to travel toward and along said adhesive coating roller means;

a heated roller means spaced from said feeding rollers and cooperating with said feeding rollers to normally maintain the Web of material passing between its associated feeding roller and said heated roller means adjacent to but out of contact with said adhesive coating roller means; and

means for selectively moving said webs of material into contact with said coating roller means to thereby apply fluid-like adhesive coating material to the surface of said web material so contacted; whereby said adhesively-coated web of material may be attached to said other web of material at said heated roller means.

5. Apparatus as defined in claim 4 further including a reversible driving means coupled to said coating roller means to enable the same to be driven in a selected direction.

6. Apparatus as defined in claim 4 wherein said means for moving one of said webs of material includes extensible cylinder and piston means coupled to at least one of said feeding rollers, said extensible cylinder and piston means being movable between a retracted position whereat said web of material upon said roller is out of contact with said coating roller means and an extended position whereat said web of material upon said roller contacts said coating roller means.

7. Apparatus as defined in claim 4 wherein said means for selectively actuating said cutter means includes extensible cylinder and piston means coupled to said cutter means, said extensible cylinder and piston means being movable between a retracted position whereat said cutter means is spaced away from said first web of material and an extended position whereat said cutter means engages said first web of material to sever the same.

8. Apparatus as defined in claim 4 further including cutter means juxtaposed to said feeding rollers; and means for selectively actuating said cutter means to sever said first Web of material.

9. Apparatus for splicing a new web of sheet material to a feeding web of sheet material which is almost exhausted, said apparatus being operable to perform said splicing without interrupting said feeding operation, said apparatus comprising:

a centrally disposed, rotatably mounted, adhesive applying roller means;

a first feeding roller disposed on one side of said adhesive applying roller means;

means rotatably and reciprocably mounting said first feeding roller to enable the same to be moved between an extended and a retracted position;

one of said webs of sheet material passing over said first feeding roller and thus being movable therewith;

said one of said webs of sheet material being out of contact with said adhesive applying roller means when said first feeding roller is in retracted position but being in contact with said adhesive applying roller means when said first feeding roller is in extended position to thereby receive an adhesive coating;

a second feeding roller spaced away from said first feeding roller and at least partially on the other side of said adhesive applying roller means;

the other of said webs of sheet material passing over said second feeding roller and extending past said adhesive applying roller means;

said other web of sheet material normally passing said adhesive applying roller means without contacting the same;

extensible means disposed on said other side of said adhesive applying roller means and being selectively movable between a retracted position out of engagement with said other web of sheet material and an extended position which engages said other web of sheet material to contact the same against said other side of said adhesive applying coating means to thereby receive an adhesive coating;

said webs of sheet material being brought into engagement with one another after leaving said apparatus to there-by adhesively attach the same together; and

cutter means in said apparatus to selectively sever one of said Webs of sheet material after the same has been adhesively attached to the other of said webs of sheet material.

10. Apparatus as defined in claim 9 further including reversible motor means coupled to said adhesive applying roller means for rotating the same in a selected direction.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,369,801 2/1945 Roesen 242-58.! 2,379,495 7/1945 Roesen 24258.5 3,298,890 1/1967 Hellemans 156-504 HAROLD ANSHER, Primary Examiner J. D. SMITH, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2369801 *Oct 26, 1943Feb 20, 1945Wood Newspaper Mach CorpApparatus for the application of prepared adhesive to webs
US2379495 *Sep 23, 1941Jul 3, 1945Wood Newspaper Mach CorpApparatus for the application of adhesive to webs
US3298890 *Nov 12, 1963Jan 17, 1967Gevaert Photo Producten N V MoApparatus for joining weblike material
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3761034 *Mar 22, 1972Sep 25, 1973Armco Steel CorpPaper feeding device
US4097323 *Jun 2, 1976Jun 27, 1978Agfa-Gevaert N.V.Butt-splicer
US4157934 *Jul 18, 1977Jun 12, 1979Compensating Tension Controls, Inc.Low tension lap slicer unit
US4720320 *Mar 3, 1986Jan 19, 1988Kimberly-Clark CorporationApparatus for splicing a trailing end of a web from a depleted coil to the leading end of a fresh coil
US20060096710 *Nov 3, 2005May 11, 2006Lintec CorporationRoll and printer
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/159, 242/555.2, 156/504, 156/353, 156/324, 156/509
International ClassificationB65H19/18
Cooperative ClassificationB65H19/1873, B65H19/1836, B65H2301/4633
European ClassificationB65H19/18F6, B65H19/18B4D