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Publication numberUS3490429 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 20, 1970
Filing dateSep 7, 1967
Priority dateSep 7, 1967
Publication numberUS 3490429 A, US 3490429A, US-A-3490429, US3490429 A, US3490429A
InventorsBenedict David S
Original AssigneeBenedict David S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Trigger mechanism for crossbows
US 3490429 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 20, 1970 D. s. BENEDICT -3,4'90, 2

TRIGGER MECHANISM FOR CROSSBOWS Filed Sept. 7, 1967 FIG. 2

no I? f 3 3e 40 A Q:

2 INVENTOR 39 DAVID s. BENEDICT 3a B) (Kiwi/pm w FIG. 4 ATTOAN rs.

United States Patent 3,490,429 TRIGGER MECHANISM FOR CROSSBOWS David S. Benedict, 8025 Farralone Ave., Canoga Park, Calif. 91304 Filed Sept. 7, 1967, Ser. No. 666,040 Int. Cl. F41b /00 U.S. Cl. 124-35 4 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Trigger mechanism for crossbows wherein the string is smoothly released by a pivoted member so as to move in a constant plane. The pivoted member in turn is controlled by a trigger element which normally holds the pivoted member in a cocked position and by rotating the trigger, it releases the pivoted member which is pivoted to release the string by the force of the string itself. A safety lock is provided which blocks movement of the trigger to release the pivoted member and there is also included a clushion for absorbing the shock of the pivoted member when the same is released.

This invention relates generally to trigger devices and more particularly to an improved trigger mechanism for holding and releasing the string of a crossbow.

In my U.S. patent application Ser. No. 345,751, filed Feb. 18, 1964, now abandoned, there is disclosed a crossbow and a trigger mechanism therefor. The present invention relates to an improved trigger mechanism which may be utilized in place of the trigger mechanism of the above-mentioned application and providing certain advantages thereover in smooth operation and safety.

The trigger mechanism of my above-mentioned patent application and other mechanisms are constructed such that no means are included for selectively and positively holding or locking the trigger against inadver ent movement. Accordingly with such mechanisms, pressure on the trigger is all that is required to release the string and arrow with resultant disadvantages relating to safety.

Another problem associated with previous trigger mechanisms for cross bows, relates to the shock or impact of the string holding element against portions of the mechanism upon release or firing of the cross bow. Upon release, the string holding element rotates forwardly. to strike an abutment member with suflicient impact to jar the cross bow, thereby affecting its accuracy.

With the foregoing in mind, it is accordingly a primary object of this invention to provide an improved trigger mechanism for a cross bow including selectively operable safety means for preventing inadvertent release of the mechanism.

Another object is to provide an improved trigger mechanism characterized by a smoothly operable release action, to the end that impact and shock loads on the cross how are reduced to a minimum.

Yet another object is to provide an improved trigger mechanism which is adapted to be automatically cocked in response to drawing the bow string rearwardly into engagement with the mechanism.

Briefly, these and many other objects and advantages of this invention are attained by providing a trigger mechanism including a string holding element pivoted for movement between first and second positions. The bow string and arrow are held by the element when in its first position and are released When it moves to its second position. A cooperating strigger member is mounted in spaced relationship to the string holding element and arranged to block movement of the element from the first position when the trigger member is in a first pivoted position. Upon movement of the trigger member to a second 3,490,429 Patented Jan. 20, 1970 pivoted position the string holding element is released for movement about its pivotal point to accordingly release the bow string and arrow.

The trigger mechanism includes an automatic cocking feature wherein the string holding element and the trigger member are structurally inter-related such that the trigger member is free to pivot by means of a biasing spring from its second pivoted position to its first pivoted position in response to rearward movement of the bow string into engagement with the string holding element to accordingly move the element from its second position to its first position.

The trigger mechanism further includes a locking means for selectively holding or restraining the trigger member in the first piovted position and thereby prevent movement of the string holding element from its first position to its second released position.

The mechanism is designed to release the bow string through movement in substantially one plane with a minimum of friction, and with a minimum of shock load and impact on the cross bow on which the trigger mechanism is mounted.

A better understanding will now be had by referring to a preferred embodiment thereof as shown in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of the rear portion of a cross bow including the trigger mechanism of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary sectional view of the trigger mechanism of FIGURE 1 looking in the direction of arrow 2 in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to FIGURE 2 showing the components of the mechanism upon release of the bow string; and,

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary sectional view taken in thedirection of arrows 44 of FIGURE 3.

Referring first to FIGURE 1, there is shown a cross bow stock 10 having a fletch groove 11 for receiving anarrow 12 as shown. In the conventional manner, the cross bow includes a bow string 13 connected to the ends of the cross bow arms (not shown). The string 13 is arranged to be held in a stretched or pulled position by a string holding element 14 constituting a portion of a trigger mechanism. A trigger member 15 cooperates with the string holding element 14 and is disposed in a position to be pulled rearwardly by a users finger.

The trigger mechanism includes a generally rectangular housing member 16, which as shown, includes spaced parallel sidewalls 17 and 18. The string holding element 14 and the trigger member 15 are pivotally mounted within the housing member 16 by means of pivot pins shown at 19 and 20 respectively. The structure and inter-relationship of the holding element 14 and trigger member 15 will become clearer as the description proceeds.

The trigger mechanism of the invention includes looking or safety means for preventing accidental or inadvertent release of the mechanism. Toward that end there is provided a safety lever 21 coupled to a pivot pin 22 mounted on a side of the cross bow stock 10 as shown. The safety lever 21 is pivotable downwardly when it is desired to release the mechanism. A stop pin 23 is mounted on a side of the cross bow stock 10 for holding the safety lever 21 in the position shown wherein the mechanism is incapable of being discharged or released.

The details of the arrangement of the locking means of the mechanism will become clearer as the description proceeds.

Referring still to FIGURE 1, it will be seen that the holding element 14 includes a base portion 24 from which a pair of ears 25 and 26 extend upwardly in spaced relation to define a groove 27 therebetween. The groove 27 is defined so as to receive the rear end of the arrow 12 as shown. The holding element 14 further includes a flange portion 28 extending upwardly from the base portion 24. The flange portion 28 is spaced rearwardly from the cars 25 and 26 so as to define a transverse groove 29 therebetween. As shown, the groove 29 is defined to receive the bow string 13.

Referring now to FIGURE 2, it will be seen that the holding element 14 is defined in part by a fiat rear edge 30 and a semi-circular bottom edge 31 joining the rear edge 30 at a corner 32. The bottom edge 31 is defined by an arc struck from the center of the pivot pin 19 about which the element 14 is pivotable. The trigger member 15 is defined in part by a flat top surface 33 joining a front inclined edge portion 34 at a corner 35.

When the holding element 14 is in a first position, and when the trigger 15 is in a first pivoted position as shown in FIGURE 2, it will be seen that the front edge 34 of the trigger 15 engages the rear edge 30 of fiie holding element 14 proximate to the corner 32. Accordingly, the holding element 14 is restrained against pivoting in a counterclockwise direction in response to the force of the string 13;

The trigger 15 includes biasing means for normally holding the trigger in its first pivoted position shown, along with means for limiting the extent to which the trigger is pivotable. Toward that end, and referring to FIGURE 2 and FIGURE 4, the trigger 15 includes a transverse opening 36 receiving a stop pin 37 which is coupled between the sidewalls 17 and 18 of the trigger mechanism. Since the transverse opening 36 is of a diameter greater than that of the pin 37, it will be seen that the pivoting movement of the trigger 15 will be restrained by the engagement of the pin 37 against the walls of the opening 36. The trigger member 15 further includes a circular recess 38 communicating with the opening 36 and receiving a coil spring 39 interposed between the bottom of the recess 38 and the pin 37. It will thus be seen that the spring 39 acts against the bottom of the recess 38 and the pin 37 to normally bias the trigger member into the first pivoted position shown in FIGURE 2.

As shown in FIGURE 2, the trigger mechanism is locked in the cocked position due to the engagement of the pin 22 against the top surface 33 of the trigger 15. In order to permit the trigger 15 to be pulled and thus pivoted counterclockwise to a second pivoted position shown in FIGURE 3, the pin 22 includes a chamfered portion 40 into which the trigger is movable upon rotation of the pin22. As shown in FIGURE 4, the chamfered portion 40 is designed of a length to accommodate the width of the trigger 15.

As heretofore mentioned, the safety lever 21 is secured to an end of the pin 22 whereby downward or clockwise pivoting movement of the lever 21 from the position shown in FIGURE 1 rotates the pin 22 in a clockwise direction as viewed in FIGURES 2 and 3. As shown in FIGURE 4, the above mentioned clockwise rotation of the lever 21 and pin 22 is opposed by the force of a coil spring 41 which is received around the pin 22 in coupled relation to the stock and the lever 21.

With the pin 22 rotated into an unlocked position shown in FIGURE 3, it is apparent that the trigger may then be pivoted to its second pivoted position. This movement releases the holding element 14 for pivoting movement to a second position wherein the rear edge 30 abuts against a cushion stop member 42 mounted on a pin 43.

The operation of the trigger mechanism of the invention will now be described. With reference first to FIG- URES 1 and 2, it will be seen that the trigger member 15 cannot be pivoted in a counterclockwise direction due to its engagement with the pin 22. It is thus apparent that the string 13 and arrow 12 cannot'be released until the lever 21 and pin 22 are rotated into the position shown in FIGURE 3. As shown in FIGURE 3 the trigger 15 may then be pulled or pivoted in a counterclockwise direction against the force of the spring 39, until the pin 37 engages the walls of the opening 36. At this point the front edge 34 of the trigger 15 will disengage from the rear edge of the holding element 14. Accordingly, the holding element 14 will pivot in a counterclockwise direction due to the force of the bow string 13 acting against the ears 25 and 26.

As the holding element 14 pivots from its first position shown in FIGURE 2 to its second position shown in FIGURE 3, the arcuate edge 31 will slide in contact with the corner of the trigger 15. Since the spring 39 is biasing the corner 35 into contact with the edge 31, it will be appreciated that the motion of the holding element 14 will be somewhat constrained. Accordingly, the rear edge 30 will strike the cushion stop member 42 with less impact than would occur if the holding element 14 were to pivot in a completely unrestrained manner. It will thus be apparent that shockloads, vibrations, and the like are reduced to provide greater accuracy in the use of the cross bow. Moreover, the ears 25 and 26 are constructed such that the bow string 13 is released to move in substantially a single plane along the top of the cross bow stock 10.

The trigger mechanism may be reset or cocked into the position shown in FIGURE 2 by simply pulling the bow string 13 rearwardly or to the right against the flange 28 of the holding element 14 when positioned as shown in FIGURE 3. As the string 13 is moved against the flange 28, the holding element 14 will pivot in a clockwise direction until the front edge 34 of the trigger clears the arcuate surface 31. At this point the spring 39 will pivot the trigger in a clockwise direction until the top portion of the opening 36 engages the pin 37. The holding element and trigger will thus be engaged as shown in FIGURE 2.

As the trigger 15 pivots into its first pivoted position shown in FIGURE 2 it will be apparent that the top surface 33 of the trigger 15 will move out of engagement with the chamfered portion 40 of the pin 22. This movement permits the spring 41 (FIGURE 4) to rotate the pin 22 and lever 21 in a counterclockwise direction until the lever 21 engages the stop pin 23 (FIGURE 1). The pin 22 will thus be disposed ina locked position as shown in FIGURE 2, thereby preventing pivoting movement of the trigger 15. Accordingly, the trigger mechanism cannot be released until the lever 21 is again moved downwardly as above described.

From the foregoing description it will be evident that the present invention provides a greatly improved trigger mechanism characterized by smooth and safe operation.

Various changes falling within the scope and spirit of the invention will occur to those skilled in the art. Accordingly the invention is not to be though of as limited to the specific embodiment set forth.

What is claimed is:

1. A crossbow trigger mechanism for holding and releasing a crossbow string, comprising in combination: holding means for the string pivotable between first and second positions for holding and releasing the string respectively; trigger means engaging a portion of said holding means to retain said holding means in said first position when said trigger means is in a first pivoted position, said trigger means being pivotable to a second pivoted position out of engagement with said portion to permit said holding means to pivot to its second position for releasing the string; and locking means for selectively holding said trigger means in said first pivoted position to retain said holding means in said first position, said locking means being manually rotatable from a locking position to permit pivoting of said trigger means to said second pivoted position, whereby said holding means is pivotable to said second position to release the string, said locking means including biasing means for automatically rotating the locking means back to its locking position after pivoting of said trigger means from said second pivoted position back to said first pivoted position, whereby said locking means llds said trigger means in said first pivoted position.

2. The subject matter of claim 1, including spring means in said trigger means for biasing said trigger means into said first pivoted position as said holding means is pivoted from said second position to said first position.

3. The subject matter of claim 1, in which said locking means includes a pin positioned above said trigger means, said pin having a chamfered portion defined therein for receiving a top portion of said trigger means when said trigger means is in said second pivoted position, and lever means coupled to said pin for rotating the pin against the force of said biasing means, wherein said chamfered portion is rotatable out of engagement with said trigger means when the trigger means is in said first pivoted position.

4. A crossbow trigger mechanism for holding and releasing a crossbow string, comprising in combination: a string holding element including first and second spaced ears defining a groove therebetween for receiving the rear end of an arrow, said element further including a flange spaced from said ears defining a transverse groove therebetween for receiving the crossbow string; pivot means for said element disposed below said transverse groove and permitting rocking movement of said element between first and second positions; a trigger member having a top surface terminating in an upper corner end engaging a rear edge of said element below said pivot means when in said first position, said trigger member being pivoted below said top surface such that pivoting movement of said trigger member moves said upper corner end out of engagement with the rear edge of said element to permit said element to pivot about said pivot means to said second position; and locking means engaging said top surface of said trigger member for holding said trigger member against rotation when said locking means is in a locked position, said locking means being rotatable to an unlocked position to permit said trigger member to be pivoted out of engagement With the rear edge of said element to permit said element to pivot to said second position.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 7/1925 Johnstone et al. 7/1958 Duncan 12435 XR US. Cl. X.R. 124-41, 40, 25

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1545465 *Mar 27, 1924Jul 7, 1925Johnstone Douglas VaughanAir pistol, air rifle, and similar weapon
US2842114 *May 26, 1955Jul 8, 1958Duncan Elois EFoldable crossbow
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3739765 *Apr 21, 1971Jun 19, 1973Moore RAutomatic loading cross-bow
US3954095 *Aug 11, 1975May 4, 1976Kenneth Don LewisBow string release device
US4192281 *May 3, 1978Mar 11, 1980King Fred VCrossbow with trigger locking device
US4509497 *Nov 24, 1980Apr 9, 1985Garvison Geary LBowstring release mechanism
US4693228 *Feb 13, 1986Sep 15, 1987Kidde Recreation Products, Inc.Crossbow trigger mechanism
US4823761 *Jun 26, 1987Apr 25, 1989Lewis And Lewis CorporationAdjustable compound leverage bowstring release
US4877008 *Nov 28, 1984Oct 31, 1989Troubridge William CCrossbow trigger mechanism
US4962747 *Feb 17, 1989Oct 16, 1990Biller Alfred BSpeargun trigger mechanism
US5184596 *Feb 5, 1992Feb 9, 1993Green James HBowstring release safety mechanism
US5642723 *Nov 13, 1995Jul 1, 1997Hogan; Howard W.Elastic band projectile slinger
US8387602 *Apr 13, 2010Mar 5, 2013Robert Kevin BruingtonFishing speargun
US8578916Sep 2, 2011Nov 12, 2013Archery America, L.L.C.Crossbow trigger assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification124/35.1, 124/40, 124/25, 124/41.1
International ClassificationF41B7/00, F41B7/04
Cooperative ClassificationF41B7/046
European ClassificationF41B7/04B2