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Publication numberUS3492049 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 27, 1970
Filing dateApr 14, 1967
Priority dateApr 14, 1967
Publication numberUS 3492049 A, US 3492049A, US-A-3492049, US3492049 A, US3492049A
InventorsPeter S Fletcher
Original AssigneePeter S Fletcher
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reclining chair of the multiple movement type
US 3492049 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 27, 1970 P. s. FLETCHER RECLINING CHAIR OF THE MULTIPLE MOVEMENT TYPE 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed April 14, 1967 ATTORNEY Jan. 27, 1970 P. s. FLETCHER 3,492,049

RECLINING CHAIR OF THE MULTIPLE MOVEMENT TYPE Filed April 14, 1967 Ow Q/ INVENTOR. PETER S. FLETCHER TBY MJ v@ ATTORNEY United States Patent O 3,492,049 RECLINING CHAIR OF THE MULTIPLE MOVEMENT TYPE Peter S. Fletcher, 200 NW. th St., Delray Beach, Fla. 33444 Filed Apr. 14, 1967, Ser. No. 630,886 Int. Cl. A47b 1/024 U.S. Cl. 297-316 10 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A multiple movement reclining chair in which the control linkage for the body-supporting means includes a holding link which maintains the seat and back-rest in a unitary relationship during their movement in the iirst phase, and which actuates a linkage portion in the second phase to increase the included angle between the seat and back-rest. A iiange on one of the movable links also revolves about a fixed member to insure proper sequencing of the two movement phases.

Background of the invention A recent development in reclining chairs is the multiple position type which provides a substantially uplight sitting position with extended leg-rest, and also provides a series of reclining positions with extended legrest for complete relaxation. In such chairs, the seat and back-rest are mounted by a linkage or mechanism on the stationary chair frame so that they are guided in a first movement phase along a substantially horizontal path to an intermediate position in which the seat and back-rest are slightly tilted but still support the body in an active sitting attitude for reading, television viewing, or the like. During this rst movement phase, a legrest is extended and elevated to a position to support the occupants outstretched legs in response to the movement of the seat and back-rest. The seat and back-rest can then be moved in a second movement phase along a substantially rotary path to a fully-reclined position, with the leg-rest maintained in its extended leg-supporting position.

Multiple position chairs are presently provided in two types, the iirst being that constructed with a unitary back-rest and seat which maintain a xed relationship during both movement phases, and the second type being that constructed with a back-rest movable relative to the seat, both back-rest and seat being mounted on the chair frame for reclining and inclining movement respectively. In this second or so called TV lounger type, the included angle between the seat and back-rest is increased to provide a completely relaxed, reclining position for the chair occupant.

In the TV lounger type of chair, the advantages of the unitary back-rest and seat during the first movement phase are combined with the advantages of the relatively movable back-rest and seat during the second movement phase. That is to say, the seat and back-rest move together during the rst movement phase without appreciable relative movement to provide an intermediate, tilted sitting position which is most suitable for accommodating the occupants body in an active sitting attitude with his legs supported outstretched. During the second movement phase, however, the angle between the back-rest and seat is increased to provide a reclined position most suitable to support the occupants body in an attitude of complete relaxation.

Among the problems inherent in the construction of the aforementioned type of TV lounger chair is that of providing a compact control linkage or mechanism which will guide the seat and back-rest as a substantially unitary structure through the first movement phase and also 3,492,049 Patented Jan. 27, 1970 move the seat and back-rest relative to each other to increase the included angle therebetween during the second movement phase. Another problem is to construct the mechanism in such a manner that movement of the seat and `back-rest in the -irst phase will cause the leg-rest to be fully extended to a leg-supporting position, while movement of the seat and back-rest in the second motion phase will have little or no effect on the leg-rest, so that the latter is maintained in the leg-supporting position. In addition, it is desirable to provide sequencing means to insure that the seat and back-rest iirst move through the first movement phase before commencing the second movement phase. All of these functions must be incorporated in a relatively simple linkage, compact enough to tit within the body of the chair and be hidden from view when not in use.

An object of the present invention is to provide an improved reclining chair of the double movement type in which improved linkage means are provided for moving the seat and back-rest as a substantially unitary structure during the iirst movement phase and for increasing the included angle between the seat and back-rest during the second motion phase.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a chair of the character described in which a holding link is provided to maintain the seat and back-rest substantially unitary during the iirst movement phase. While holding links have -been previously provided for this purpose, as shown in my U.S. Patent No. 3,157,431 issued on Nov. l7, 1964, such holding links were previously mounted on a movable portion of the control linkage so that they could move in an inactive manner during the second movement phase. In contrast, the holding link of the present invention is pivotally mounted on the support frame. This holding link arrangement produces flexibility of control of chair movement as well as independence of control of the seat and back-rest as explained in my pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 565,272, which application shares some common features with this application.

A further object of the invention is the provision of an improved freely moving sequencing structure to insure proper operation of the chair at all times. This sequencing structure is formed as extensions of existing chair parts and avoids the usual cams and other parts which involve high opposing forces and the generation of high pressures which can result in jamming and/ or excessive wear.

Summary of the invention In accordance with the invention herein, there is provided a reclining chair including a seat and back-rest mounted by a control linkage on a support for inclining and reclining movement through first and second movement phases. The control linkage includes a front guide link pivotally connected to the seat and a rear guide link pivotally connected to the back-rest, with the guide links turning rearwardly during the first motion phase to move the seat and back-rest rearwardly. During the second movement phase, the front guide link is elevated to permit the seat to tilt to a reclined position and the back-rest turns about its pivotal mount with the rear guide link to increase the angle between the seat and `back-rest. The control linkage also includes a bell crank pivotally mounted on the seat and movable during the second motion phase to eect tilting movement of the seat and backrest relative to each other, and a holding link which prevents relative movement between the seat and backrest during the rst movement phase. Sequencing means are provided to prevent the front guide link from elevating during the rst movement phase, said sequencing means including a flange carried by the front guide link and engaging astop member during the first movement phase.

At the end of the irst movement phase, the flange has turned clear of the stop member to permit upward movement of the front guide link and the forward portion of the seat.

Additional objects and advantages of the invention will Ibecome apparent during the course of the following specification when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view, with parts broken away and shown in section, of a reclining chair of the double movement type embodying features of the present invention, with the chair shown in upright or sitting position;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view similar to FIG. 1, but showing the chair in an intermediate, tilted sitting position, with the leg-rest moved to an elevated leg-supporting position;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view, similar to FIG. 2, but showing the chair in a fully-reclined position wherein the back-rest and seat have been angularly displaced relative to each other to establish a complete relaxation position for the chair occupant, and with the leg-rest disposed in an elevated, leg-supporting position;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view showing in detail the sequencing structure of the chair in the upright sitting position of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view similar to FIG. 4, but showing the arrangement of the sequencing structure during the beginning of the first movement phase;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view similar to FIG. 4, but showing the arrangement of the sequencing structure at the end of the first movement phase or in the intermediate position of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 7 is an enlarged section taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 1, showing the arrangement of the sequencing structure in the upright sitting position of the chair.

Referring in detail to the drawings and particularly to FIGS. 1 3, there is shown a reclining chair incorporating the present invention and including a support or stationary base frame 10 having opposite side walls 12 interconnected by suitable cross braces 14 mounted on high legs 16.

The chair also includes body-supporting means 18 comprising a back-rest 20 and a seat 22 which are mounted on the support frame 10 for reclining and inclining movement respectively through a first movement phase from an upright position illustrated in FIG. 1, to an intermediate, tilted sitting position shown in FIG. 2, and through a second movement phase from the intermediate, tilted sitting position through a series of reclining positions to a fully-reclined or complete relaxation position, shown in FIG. 3.

Normally disposed beneath the forward end of the seat 22 is a leg-rest 24 formed of two hinged parts, namely a main leg-rest section 26 and an auxiliary leg-rest section or front extension 28. The leg-rest 24 is mounted by a control linkage on the forward end portion of the seat 22 for movement between a retracted position shown in FIG. 1 and an extended leg-supporting position shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. As will be described, the leg-rest 24 is coordinated to the back-rest 20 and seat 22 for movement into an elevated leg-supporting position in response to the first movement phase of the chair, with the leg-rest remaining substantially in the elevated leg-supporting position as the chair moves from the intermediate, tilted sitting position of FIG. 2 to the fully-reclined position of FIG. 3.

Movement of the seat, back-rest and leg-rest, relative to the stationary support frame 10 and relative to each other, is achieved by means of a pair of identical metal iixtures secured at opposite sides of the chair of the Side frames 12 and including mounting members or brackets aixed to the various chair parts and interconnected linkages for providing the leg-rest movement, seat movement and back-rest movement. For convenience of illustration, only one fixture is shown herein and the description thereof will apply identically to the opposite fixture. The xture shown in FIGS. 1-3 includes a metal seat frame 30 which supports the upholstered seat 22. Immovably secured by rivets 34 to the front portion of seat frame 30 and depending therefrom is a front seat mounting bracket 32. Similarly secured by rivets 36 to the rear portion of the seat frame 30 is a rear seat bracket 38 which has an upwardly curved rear end portion which projects beyond the rear end of the mounted seat and is connected by pivot 40 to a back-rest mounting bra-cket 42. The bracket 42 is secured to the back-rest 20 by bolts or rivets 44 and has a lower end which extends downwardly beyond the lower end of the `back-rest 20 and serves as a rigid depending extension thereof.

The fixture also includes a support plate 46 secured by bolts or rivets 48 to the respective side frame 12 so that the support plate 46 constitutes a rigid and immovable portion of the support frame 10 about which the other iixture portions move. Mounted by pivot 52 on the stationary support plate 46 is a rear guide link 54, the opposite end of which is connected by pivot 56 to the backrest mounting bracket 42.

The lower end of the back-rest mounting bracket 42 is connected by pivot 58 to a second movement control link 60 which extends forwardly to a pivotal connection 62 with a bell crank 64. This bell crank 64 extends upwardly and rearwardly from the pivot 62 and has an arm connected by pivot 66 to a mid guide link or holding link 68, the lower end of which is mounted by a stationary pivot 70 on the support plate 46. The bell crank has an intermediate arm located between pivots 62 and 66, which arm is connected by pivot 72 to the forward end on the rear seat bracket 38.

.Connected by pivot 74 to the front seat mounting bracket 32 is a front guide link 76 which, as shown in the drawings, is in the form of a wide plate. Intermediate its ends, the front guide link 76 is connected by pivot 78 to the forward end of a carrier link assembly 80 which comprises a front bracket 82 connected by an elongated rod 84 to a rear bracket 86. The rear bracket 86 of the carrier link assembly 80 is mounted by stationary pivot 88 on the support plate 46.

The xture parts heretofore described constitute a linkage sub-assembly which guides and controls the movement of the seat and back-rest relative to the support frame during both the first and second movement phases. The front guide link 76, however, also serves as the drive member for the leg-rest mounting linkage, as will be presently described.

The leg-rest 24 is mounted by a control linkage 90 on the forward end of the seat 22 for movement between the retracted position shown in FIG. 1 and the extended positions shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. The control linkage 90 includes a pair of supporting links 92 and 94 mounted on the seat, and a pair of leg-rest links 96 and 98 connected to the leg-rest 24. Specifically, the supporting links 92 and 94 are mounted at spaced points on the frontfseat mounting bracket 32 by respective pivots 100 and 102. The opposite end of the supporting link 94 is connected by pivot 104 to the end of leg-rest link 98. The lower end of supporting link 92 is connected by pivot 106 to an intermediate portion of the leg-rest link 98. The rear end of the leg-rest link 96 is connected by pivot 108 to the supporting link 92 at a point spaced slightly inwardly of the pivot 106, and its forward end is connected by` pivot to the main leg-rest section 26. The forward end of legrest 98 is connected by pivot 112 to the leg-rest main section 26, the pivot 112 being spaced from the pivot 110.

The auxiliary leg-rest section 28 is connected by pivot 114 to the main leg-rest section 26. The leg-rest link 96 has an extension portion 96a projecting beyond the pivot 110, and the end of this extension portion 96a is connected by pivot 116 to a connecting link 118, the opposite end of which is connected by pivot 120 to the auxiliary leg-rest section 28.

As previously indicated, the front guide link 76 also serves as the drive means for the leg-rest mounting linkage 90, such that when the front guide link turns during the first motion phase, it causes the mounting linkage 90 to expand and elevate and extend the leg-rest from the retracted position of FIG. 1 to the extended position of FIG. 2. For this purpose, one end of an actuating link 122 is mounted by pivot 124 to the lower end of the front guide link 76, while the opposite end of link 122 is connected by pivot 126 to an intermediate portion of the legrest supporting link 92.

Because of the pivot 40 interconnecting the seat 22 and back-rest 20, the seatand back-rest can turn relative to each other so that the angle therebetween is varied during the chair movement. In double movement chairs of this type, however, it is desirable that there be little or no relative movement between the back-rest and seat during the first movement phase so that the intermediate, tilted sitting position of FIG. 2 is established with substantially no change in the angular relationship between the backrest and seat, except for small adjustments which may be made in the included angle therebetween as may be required for balance and/or for establishing a more comfortable attitude in such intermediate, tilted sitting position. If the seat 22 and the back-rest 20 were connected together as a rigid integral unit, the movement of such an integral unit during the first movement phase would be guided and directed by the simultaneous rearward turning movements of the lfront guide link 76 and the rear guide link 54 about their respective pivotal mounts. In the chair shown herein, provision is made for precluding appreciable relative movement between the back-rest and the seat 22 during the first movement phase. This is accomplished by means of the mid guide link 68 which acts as a holding link.

During the first movement phase, the body supporting means 18 is guided by two links, namely the front guiding link 76 and the rear guiding link 54, with the mid guide link 68 positioned and pivotally connected to the linkage in such a manner that it serves substantially the same function as a stop between the seat and back-rest to effectively maintain a rigid relationship therebetween. Thus the pivot point 66 is guided by the mid guide link 68 to move through substantially the same path that it would follow if the seat 22 and back-rest 20 were rigid with each other. The mid guide link 68 may therefore be made of such a length that it maintains an absolutely rigid relationship between the moving seat and back-rest during the first motion phase, or its length may be adjusted to vary the angular relationship between the seat and back-rest slightly in accordance with the requirements of chair balance and comfort. The function and operation of such holding links generally, is more fully described in my prior U.S. Patent No. 3,157,431. The holding links disclosed therein, however, differ from the link 68 herein in that they are mounted on a movable portion of the chair linkage rather than mounted by a fixed pivot on the support.

The front bracket 82 of the carrier link assembly 80 has a lower perpendicular flange 128 which, in the up- 'right sitting position of the chair, rests upon a stop member 130 affixed to and projecting from the forward end of the support plate 46 as can be best seen in FIGS. 4 and 7. The carrier link rod 84 is therefore supported immovably in a substantially horizontal position between its fixed pivot 88 at one end and the stop member 130 at the other end. The front guide link is inclined forwardly in an almost horizontal direction from its pivotal mount 78 on the stationary carrier link bracket 82 to its pivotal connection 74 with the front seat mounting bracket 32. The front end of the seat 22 therefore supported upon the stop member 130 through bracket 32, front guide link 76 and bracket 82.

In the upright sitting position of FIG. 1, the mid guide link 68 is inclined forwardly from its lower fixed pivotal mount 70 to its pivotal connection 66 with the bell crank 64, while the rear guide link 54 is in a substantially vertical position. The seat 22 is substantially level and the back-rest 20 is substantially upright in a normal sitting position.

During the first movement phase, the seat 22 and backrest 20 are moved together as a unit in a substantially horizontal rearward path relative to the support frame 10. In this movement phase, the seat and back-rest are guided by the rearward pivoting movement of the front guide link 76 about its pivotal mount 78 and by the rearward turning movement of the rear guide link 54 about its fixed pivot 52. The carrier link assembly 80 remains immovable in horizontal position during this rst movement phase, with the front bracket tiange 128 resting upon stop member 130, so that the pivotal mount 78 of the front guide link 76 upon the carrier link front bracket 82 remains stationary. A sequencing arrangement is provided, as will be presently described in detail, to insure that the carrier link assembly 80 does not turn upwardly about its rear pivotal mount 88 during this first movement phase.

-In the course of the first movement phase, the mid guide link 68 turns rearwardly about its fixed pivot 70, serving as a holding link which maintains the desired rigid relationship between the seat and back-rest, which move rearwardly as a unit. As previously indicated, the mid guide link 68 is sized and arranged to follow the movement of the seat and back-rest provided by the front and rear guide links 76 and 54, and in turning rearwardly about its pivot 70 it guides both the rear portion of the seat 22 and the front portion of the back-rest 20 along the same path of movement. The mid guide link also carries the second movement linkage rearwardly with the seat and back-rest without relative movement of the links thereof. That is to say, during the first motion phase the rear seat, mounting bracket 38, back-rest mounting bracket 42, second movement control link 60, and bell crank 64 move rearwardly together without change in the angular relationships, guided by the mid guide link 68 and the rear guide link 54.

During the first movement phase, the leg-rest 24 is elevated and extended from its retracted position shown in FIG. 1 to its extended position shown in FIG. 2. As the front guide link 76 turns about its stationary pivot 78, its lower end portion moves forwardly, urging actuating link 122 in a forward direction. Link 122 in turn causes supporting link 92 to turn forwardly about its pivot 100, thereby extending the leg-rest control linkage in the manner shown in FIG. 2.

During the extension of the leg-rest control linkage 90, the leg-rest link 96 turns about its pivotal connection with the main leg-rest section 26, and its extension 96a moves connecting link 118 in such a manner that the latter causes the auxiliary leg-rest section 28 to turn rapidly about its pivotal connection 114 with the mainleg rest section 26. Thus, while the main section 26 is turned through an angle of approximately 90 from its vertical position of FIG. 1 to the extended horizontal position of FIG. 2, the auxiliary section 28 is turned through an angle of approximately from its inverted, horizontal, underslung position of FIG. 1 to its extended position of FIG. 2. In the extended position, the two leg-rest sections 26 and 28 are in planar alignment, and together make up the completed leg-rest 24, which is of sufiicient length to provide adequate support for the occupants legs.

Provision is made for blocking relative movement between the front guide link 76 and the seat 22 to define the end of the first movement phase. Specifically, the front guide link 76 carries a laterally-projecting stop 132 which, when the leg-rest is in the fully extended position of FIG. 2, engages a notch 134 in the lower surface of the front seat mounting bracket 32. This engagement stops further rearward turning movement of the front guide link 76 about its pivotal mount 78 and halts further movement of the chair parts inthe first movement phase, defining the intermediate, tilted' sitting position. The chair is now free to move in the second movement phase, instituted by upward turning movement of the carrier link assembly 80 about the lixed pivot 88.

As previously indicated, sequencing means are provided to insure that the chair in the upright position of FIG. 1 will rst move through and complete the rst movement phase, guided by turning movement of the front guide link 76 and rear guide link 54, before it can move through the second movement phase by means of the upward turning movement of the carrier link assembly. This sequencing means comprises a sequence link in the nature of a flat plate or flange 136 secured to and extending perpendicularly from the front guide linkl 76 toward the support plate 46 as shown in FIG. 7. This flange 136 cooperates with the stop member `130 on the support plate 46 to perform the sequencing function. FIGS. 4 to 6 show successive positions of the sequencing flange 136 during the rst movement phase. FIG. 4 shows the parts in the upright sitting position of FIG. l, the flange 136 being disposed in a horizontal position and located directly beneath and in contact with the stop member 130. The stop member 130 is thus in effect sandwiched between the ange 136 and the flange 128 of bracket 82. In order for the carrier link assembly 80 to turn upwardly about its xed pivot 88, it would necessarily carry upwardly with it the connected front guide link 76 and the forward end of the seat 22. However, the front guide link 76 is restrained from moving upwardly because of the engagement of its rigidly mounted sequencing flange 136 with the under surface of the stop member 130, and the carrier link assembly is therefore effectively held in its horizontal position.

As the front guide link 76 turns about its pivotal mount 78 during the first movement phase, its sequencing flange 136 rotates about pivot 78 and thus turns around the adjacent stop member 130. During this turning movement, the flange 136 is almost in continuous contact with the underside of the stop mem-ber 130. FIG. 5 illustrates a successive position of the flange 136 during the irSt movement phase, in which will be seen that the ange 136 still underlies the stop member 130 and is effective in preventing the carrier link assembly from turning upwardly. FIG 6 illustrates the intermediate, tilted sitting position of the chair at the end of the first movement phase. It will be seen in this view that the sequence flange 136 haS been turned by the front guide link 76 from its original horizontal position of FIG. 4 to a vertical position in which it is entirely clear of the stop member 130. Thus, at the end of the first movement phase, the front guide link and its pivotal mount 78 are freed to move vertically upward, so that the carrier link assembly 80 is also freed to turn upwardly about the pivotal mount 88 and the second movement phase can be initiated.

In commercial practice, the stop member 130 is made in the form of a nylon roller so that the sequence flange 136 may turn freely with a minimum of friction if the flange is forced into hard contact with said stop member.

It should be also noted that the sequence flange prevents closing up of the leg-rest linkage until after the chair has been returned to the intermediate, tilted sitting position. FIGS. 3 and 6 show that the flange 136 is of a length which allows it to contact the stop member'130 if the legrest linkage would tend to close up in the fully reclined position of FIG. 3. Consequently, the chair must be moved to the intermediate, tilted sitting-position so that the sequence flange 136 can clear the stop 130 as shown in FIG. 6

During the second movement phase, the carrier link assembly 80 turns about its pivotal mount 88 on the support plate 46, causing movement of the seat 22 and back-rest to the fully reclined position of FIG. 3. AS

the forward end of the carrier link assembly .moves upwardly, its front bracket 82 is lifted from the stop member 130, and it elevates the connected front guide `link 76 which is now maintained in an immovable position by virtue of engagement of the stop 132 with the notch 134. Since the front guide link 76 is maintained in thisrigid attitude, the leg-rest control linkage is merely elevated with the forward portion of the seat in a constant and immovable attitude, without further extension of the legrest. Throughout the second movement phase' andv in the fully-reclined position of FIG. 3, therefore, the leg-rest is maintained at the same extended position relative to the forward end of the seat 22 that it had in the intermediate, tilted sitting position of FIG. 2.

The second movement phase is accomplished by pressure being exerted on they back-rest 20. This rearward pressure on the back-rest 20 is transmitted through the rigidly connected back-rest mounting bracket 42 and the second movement control link 60. The force in the link 60 is in the forward direction and causes the bell crank 64 to rotate clockwise as viewed in FIG. 2 about its pivot 66 on the mid-guide link 68. This pivot 66 serves as a relatively stationary supporting mount for the bell crank 64 during the second movement phase. The clockwise rotation of the bell crank 64 carries the seat upwardly through the pivotal connection 72. The upward movement of the seat carries the front guide link 76 and the front end of the carrier link assembly 80 in an upward direction also. f

The effect of the aforementioned action is to raise the seat with an inclining movement through its pivotal connections 40 to the back-rest and 72 to the bell crank. At the same time, the back-rest 20 is reclined to open up the included angle between seat and back-rest. The pivot 66v of the mid-guide link 68, the carrier link pivot 88 and the rear guide link pivot 56 serve as support pivots for the second movement linkage. As the back-rest turns rearwardly, the control link 60 moves forwardly and upwardly until it contacts the pin forming the pivot 72 between the bell crank 64 and rear seat bracket 38. This contact between the control link 60` and the pin at 72 limits further movement of the chair parts to establish the end of the second movement phase when the chair has reached the fully-reclined position shown in FIG. 3.

-In operation, when the chair occupant is seated in the chair and exerts rearward pressure with his body upon the seat and back-rest, the front guide link 76 and rear guide link 54 simultaneously turn rearwardly about their respective pivotal lmounts 78 and 52 and carry the seat 22 and back-rest 20 as a rigidly coupled unit in a substantially horizontal path through the rst motion phase. This movement continues until the front guide link stop member 132 engages the notch 134 in the front seat mounting bracket 32 and locks the extended leg-rest linkage 90 and front guide link 76 from further movement.

When the occupant of the chair in the intermediate, tilted sitting position of FIG. 2 wishes to assume a more relaxed attitude, he initiates the second movement phase by applying his weight rearwardly against back-rest 20. Since the carrier link assembly 80 is now released by the sequencing link 136, it can now turn upwardly aboutits pivotal mount 88, allowing the seat 22 to move upwardly when the second 'movement linkage is actuated by turning rearward movement of the back-rest 20 relative to the seat 22 in such a manner as to increase the included angle therebetween. The second movement may be continued until the second movement control link 60 engages the.

pin 72, at which point the chair is in the fully reclined position of FIG. 3.

When the chair occupant desires to restore the chair to the upright position of FIG. 1, he leans forwardly and exerts downward pressure on the leg-rest, so that the back-rest, seat and leg-rest move through the reverse sequence, with the chair first moving into the intermedi- 9 ate, tilted position of FIG. 2 and then returning to the upright sitting position illustrated in FIG. l.

While a preferred embodiment of the invention has been shown and described herein, it is obvious that numerous omissions, changes and additions may be made in such embodiment without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A reclining chair comprising a support, body supporting means including a seat and back-rest mounted on said support for inclining and reclining movement respectively, means pivotally connecting said seat and backrest, a control linkage operatively connected between said support and said body supporting means and providing respective first and second paths of movement for said body supporting means during first and second movement phases, said control linkage including front guide means having a pivotal mount, means supporting said pivotal mount immovably adjacent the forward portion of said support during the first movement phase, said front guide means being pivotally connected to the forward end portion of said seat, rear guide means pivotally mounted on the support and pivotally connected to said back-rest, a bell crank pivotally mounted on said seat at a first pivot point, a holding link pivotally mounted on said support and pivotally connected to said bell crank at a second pivot point spaced rearwardly from said first pivot point, a second movement control link pivotally connected to said back-rest and connected to said bell crank at a third pivot point spaced forwardly of said first pivot point, said front and rear guide means and said holding link moving said seat and back-rest rearwardly together during said first movement phase and maintaining a substantially rigid relationship between said seat and back-rest, and said bell crank and second movement control link maintaining a substantially fixed angular relationship with each other and with said body supporting means, said bell crank turning relative to said support, said seat turning about its pivotal connection with said back-rest, and said back-rest turning about its pivotal connection with said rear guide means during said second movement phase to progressively increase the angular relationship between said seat and back-rest.

2. A reclining chair according to claim 1, in which the means supporting the pivotal mount of the front guide means includes a carrier member pivotally mounted on said support, said front guide means comprising a front guide link pivotally mounted on the forward end of said carrier member, said rear guide members comprising a rear guide link, said bell crank being pivotally mounted intermediate its ends on said seat and pivotally connected at one end to said holding link and at its yother end to the second movement control link, said carrier member remaining stationary relative to the support during the first movement phase, and moving relative to the support during the second movement phase.

3. A reclining chair according to claim 2 in which said seat and the bell crank mounted thereon are moved upwardly with said carrier member during the second movement phase, said holding link serving as a pivotal support for said bell crank at its connected end therewith, and said bell crank turning about its pivotal mount on said seat, said bell crank being moved by said second movement control link to effect turning movement of said back-rest relative to said seat.

4. A reclining chair according to claim 2 which also includes a leg-rest, and a leg-rest linkage mounting said leg-rest on said seat for movement from a retracted position to an extended position during said first motion phase, said front guide link having a free end portion extending beyond its pivotal mount on said carrier member, and actuating link means connecting said front guide link free end portion to said leg-rest mounting linkage for movement of said leg-rest to its extended position in response to turning movement of said front guide link during said first motion phase.

5. A reclining chair according to claim 4 in which stop means are provided between saidfront guide link and said support for restraining further pivoting rearward movement of said front guide link at the end of said first movement phase with the leg-rest in extended position.

6. A reclining chair according to claim 4 which also includes sequencing means for limiting initial movement of said seat and back-rest in the first movement phase to said first path of movement provided by rearward turning movement of said front and rear guide links, said sequencing means comprising a fixed projection on said support, and a laterally-projecting flange on said front guide link, said flange being movable with said front guide link from a substantially horizontal position directly beneath said projection at the start of said first movement phase, to a substantially vertical position adjacent to and clear of said projection at the end of said first movement phase, whereby said guide link, at the vertical position of said flange is freed to move upwardly with said seat during the second movement phase.

7. A reclining chair of the multiple movement type comprising a support, body supporting means including a seat and back-rest mounted on said support for movement in a first phase along a first path from an upright sitting position to an intermediate, tilted sitting position and for further movement in a second movement phase along a second path from said intermediate position to a fully-reclined position, a link pivotally connected to said seat for turning movement about a pivotal connection during said first movement phase, and for upward translation with said seat during said second movement phase, and sequencing means to restrain upward translation of said link during said first motion phase, said sequencing means comprising a laterally projecting flange on said link and a stop member on said support, said flange being arranged for disposition in a substantially horizontal position proximate to said stop member and underlying the same in said upright, sitting position, whereby to block upward translation of said link, said flange turning with said linkI and revolving around said stop member during said first movement phase to a release position at the end of said first movement phase in which said flange is substantially vertically disposed adjacent one side of said stop member, whereby said link and seat are freed for upward movement during the second movement phase.

8. A reclining chair according to claim 7 which also includes carrier means movably mounted on said support, and in which said link comprises a front guide link pivotally mounted on said carrier means and pivotally connected to said seat, said guide link turning upon said carrier means during said first movement phase and being movable upwardly with said seat and said carrier means during said second movement phase.

9. A reclining chair according to claim 8 in which said carrier means includes a carrier member pivoted to said support, said stop member also supporting said carrier member in a stationary position during said first movement phase.

10. A reclining chair according to claim 9 which also includes a rear guide link pivotally mounted on the support and pivotally connected to said back-rest, a pivotal connection between said seat and said back-rest, a bell crank pivotally mounted on said seat, a holding link pivotally mounted on said support and pivotally connected to said bell crank, and a second movement control link pivotally connected to said back-rest and to said bell crank, said bell crank and second movement control link maintaining a substantially fixed angular relationship with each other and with said body supporting means during said first movement phase, said bell crank turning relative to said support, said seat turning about its pivotal connection with said back-rest, and said back-rest back-rest.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 6/ 1964 Fletcher et al 297--89 2/1967 Mizelle et al. 297--85 12 i 4/1967 weicher.l 297-89 5/ 1967 Hampton 297-89 FOREIGN PATENTS f 1,386,124 `10/1964 France.A l JAMES T. MCCALL, Primary Examiner Us. c1. XR.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3865432 *May 29, 1973Feb 11, 1975Royal Dev CoReclining chair
US4798414 *Feb 22, 1988Jan 17, 1989Vincent HughesPhysiotherapeutic chair like device
US5013084 *Apr 6, 1989May 7, 1991Action Industries, Inc.Mechanism for high-leg reclining chair
US5354116 *Oct 1, 1992Oct 11, 1994The Lane Company, Inc.Reclining chair with articulating linkage for padded intermediate ottoman
US5368366 *Mar 5, 1993Nov 29, 1994Mizelle; Ned W.Shallow profile legrest and furniture
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/316, 297/83, 297/89
International ClassificationA47C1/0355
Cooperative ClassificationA47C1/0355
European ClassificationA47C1/0355