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Publication numberUS3492744 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 3, 1970
Filing dateMay 9, 1968
Priority dateMay 9, 1968
Publication numberUS 3492744 A, US 3492744A, US-A-3492744, US3492744 A, US3492744A
InventorsBernier Louis E, Giblin James P
Original AssigneeWright & Co Inc E T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf shoe and bottom therefor
US 3492744 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' Feb. 3, 970 L'..E. BER-.ER rm $492,144"

' GOLF SHOE ANDBOTTOM THEREFOR Filed May 9. 1968 V 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 J ew i m" Feb. 3,1970 V E. BEYRNIERIETALI 3,492,144-

. GOLF SHOE AND BOTTOM THEREFOR v Filed may 9, 1968 2 sheets-sheet 2 J1 $.10 ,6 11 1&4 JI

United States Patent 3,492,744 GOLF SHOE AND BOTTOM THEREFOR Louis E. Bernier, Rockland, and James P. Giblin, Milton,

Mass, assignors to E. T. Wright 8: Co., Inc., Rockland,

Mass, a corporation of Massachusetts Filed May 9, 1968, Ser. No. 727,819 Int. Cl. A43c 15/02 U.S. Cl. 36-59 22 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A golf shoe and bottom therefor provided with cleats anchored to an insert corresponding substantially in shape to the part of the bottom of the shoe with which it is to be used, said insert being incorporated in the bottom between the outsole and the insole with the cleats extending through holes in the outsole, and said cleats being comprised of a metal hard enough to last for the approximate life of the shoe without replacement.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Golf shoes provided with metal cleats are disclosed in U.S. Patents 3,204,347, 2,918,733, 2,784,503 and 3,337,971. The primary consideration disclosed in these patents was to provide a structure which would enable anchoring threaded sockets to the bottoms of shoes for removably receiving cleats provided with threaded portions for engagement with the threaded socket and to prevent the cleats from becoming loose during use. The purpose of the present invention is to provide a bottom structure such that the cleats are permanently attached and will remain effective approximately throughout the life of the shoe; to provide an insert which can be easily incorporated in the bottom of substantially any kind of shoe, whether hand-made or machine made or whether comprised of natural or man-made materials; to provide a cleated bottom in which only the ground-engaging portions of the cleats extend from the tread surface so that there is minimum disturbance of the turf and minimum caking; to provide a cleated bottom in which the inserts to which the cleats are attached are dimensionally stable pliant platforms which not only afford foot stability but also absorb local disturbances of the bottom caused by contact of the cleats with hard or firm objects; and to provide a cleated bottom in which there is substantially no possibility of dirt and/or water entering around the cleats into the internal structure of the bottom.

SUMMARY As herein illustrated, the shoe has a composite bottom provided with cleats comprising an outsole having a tread surface from which projects a plurality of cleats, each cleat having a portion extending inwardly from the tread surface and an insert disposed inwardly of the tread surface of the outsole to which the inwardly extending portions of the cleats are secured; characterized in that the insert has on the surface next to the outsole a plurality of bosses of relatively large diameter and the cleats have heads of smaller diameter than said bosses embedded therein. Inserts are provided for the forepart and heel ends of the shoe bottom and these correspond substantialy in shape to the area of the portion of the bottom in which they are to be incorporated. In a welt shoe, for example, the insert at the forepart of the shoe is lodged between the outsole and the insole in place of the conventional filler. In a flat lasted shoe, that is, a shoe in which the upper is wiped in over the outsole and cemented thereto, also known as a cement lasted shoe, the outsole is recessed to receive the insert. In a molded shoe the insert is embedded in the bottom.

3,492,744 Patented Feb. 3, 1970 If an elevated heel is employed the top lift is recessed to receive the insert or the lift next to the top lift is recessed to receive the insert and the top lift is provided with holes through which the cleats project. If the heel is formed by molding the insert will be embedded in the heel end of the shoe in the same fashion that the insert at the forepart is embedded in the outsole. Optionally, a cleated bottom unit may be made independently of the upper comprising a molded outsole and heel unit in which the inserts are embedded by injection molding or a molded outsole and heel unit containing cavities at the heel and forepart may be provided together with inserts adapted to be pressed into the cavity. The cleats comprise a shank portion of cylindrical right section, a circular head of relatively large diameter at one end and a tapered portion terminating in a tip at the other end. A hard wearresistant metal is provided at the tip by a core piece set into an axially extending socket in the tip end of the pin. The shank and heel are comprised of a softer metal.

The inserts for the forepart and heel each comprise a uniformly thick, dimensionally stable yet pliant platform of dense plastisol and integral bosses at one side in which are embeded the heads of the cleats.

The invention will now be described in greater detail with reference to the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is an elevation of a shoe with cleats at the bottom;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of an insert embodying a plurality of cleats for use at the forepart of a shoe;

FIG. 3 is an elevation from one side of FIG 2, partly in section;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of an insert embodying a plurality of cleats for use at the heel end of a shoe;

FIG. 5 is an elevation from one side of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is an elevation of a single cleat, partly in section;

FIG. 7 is a plan view of the head of the cleat;

FIG. 8 is a plan view of the tip of the cleat;

FIG. 9 is a plan view of the inner side of an outsole showing a plurality of recesses at the forepart with holes at their centers for receiving the bosses and cleats of an insert placed against the inner side thereof;

FIG. 10 is a section taken on the line 10-10 of FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary section, to larger scale, of an outsole with an insert supported against its inner side and a cleat extending through the hole at the center of the recess;

FIG. 12 is a plan view of an outsole provided with a recess at its forepart corresponding in configuration to the insert to be used with a plurality of recesses at the bottom and holes at the centers thereof for receiving the bosses and cleats;

FIG. 13 is a section taken on the line 13--13 of FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary section, to larger scale, showing an insert seated in the forepart recess with a boss and cleat extending into the recess and hole at the bottom thereof;

FIG. 15 is an elevation, partly in section, showing incorporation of an insert in an elevated heel;

FIG. 15a is an elevation, partly in section, showing incorporation of an insert in a heel provided with a single lift;

FIG. 16 is a transverse section of a welt shoe with an insert incorporated in the bottom cavity at the forepart;

FIG. 17 is a transverse section of a flat or cement lasted shoe with an insert incorporated in the recess at the inner side of the outsole at the forepart;

FIG. 18 is a transverse section of a shoe provided with a bottom formed by molding of a bottom-forming material with an insert embodied therein at the forepart;

FIG. 19 is an exploded view in elevation showing 'a molded bottom recessed to receive molded inserts at the forepart and heel ends;

FIG. 20 is a plan view of a unit bottom ready for attachment to a shoe upper comprising a molded sole and heel in which the inserts are embedded; and

FIG. 21 is a section taken longitudinally of FIG. 20.

The invention, as herein illustrated, relates to the manufacture of golf shoes and/or bottoms therefor provided with cleats, such shoes comprising, as shown in FIG. 1, an upper 10 of appropriate material and a bottom having a forepart 12 and heel 14, from the tread surfaces of which project cleats 16. The bottom structure which is illustrated herein with reference to welt, flat lasted and molded shoes is applicable to substantially all kinds of shoes whether hand or machine made and whether comprised of natural or man-made material.

In accordance with the invention inserts to which the cleats are attached are provided for incorporation in the bottom according to the type of shoe and these inserts comprise an insert 18 adapted to be incorporated in the bottom at the forepart and an insert 20 adapted to be incorporated into the bottom at the heel. Each insert, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 4, comprises a uniformly thick platform 18a, 20a which corresponds in shape to the part of the bottom of the shoe in which it is to be incorporated, from one side of which project a plurality of bosses 18b, 20b at places where the cleats are to be situated. The platform is approximately 4; inch thick and each boss is approximately of an inch in diameter and approximately A of an inch thick. The platform and bosses are formed integral, being comprised of plastisol and a cleat 16 is secured in each of the bosses.

The term plastisol employed herein is intended to embrace any and all natural and/or man-made elastomers suitable for the purpose. The platforms are comprised of a dense plastisol which is relatively hard and firm and yet is pliable.

Each cleat comprises a cylindrical shank portion 22, approximately of an inch in diameter; a circular head 24, approximately /2 inch in diameter and of an inch thick; and a conical portion 26 terminating in a tip 26a, the extremity of which is approximately of an inch in diameter. The conical portion 26 of the cleat is approximately of an inch long and contains an axial hole in which is set a core of very hard metal. The shank, head and tapered portions are comprised of a relatively soft metal. Preferably the core is a tungsten alloy and the remainder of the cleat a relatively soft steel. It is to be understood, however, that equivalent materials may be substituted therefor. It is also to be understood that the aforesaid dimensions of the cleats are by way of example, only, and may be varied so as to be consistent with the bottom structure in which they are to be incorporated, to provide for maximum wear, comfort to the wearer and minimum disturbance of the turf.

The cleats are secured to the inserts 18 and 20 by a process of injection molding in which they are held with their heads extending into a mold cavity and the plastisol or its equivalent, of which the inserts are to be comprised, is injected into the cavity around the heads of the cleats. The cleats are so supported that their heads are buried in the bosses 18b, 20b intermediate their upper and lower extremities as illustrated in FIG. 3. As thus incorporated the heads of the cleats all lie in a plane below the lower surface of the platform from which the bosses project.

Although the inserts 18 and 20 to which the cleats are secured are shown as separate pieces, it is within the scope of the invention to form the two pieces as a single piece, for example, for use in a shoe bottom without an elevated heel.

The inserts 18 and 20 or a single insert comprised of the inserts 18 and 20 may be employed for making golf shoes with leather bottoms or composition bottoms. By

way of example but without restriction there is shown in FIG. 9 a leather outsole containing at its inner side at the forepart a plurality of circular recesses 32a corresponding in diameter and thickness to the diameter and thickness of the bosses 18b on the platform 18a. At the center of each recess 32a there is a hole 34a which is slightly smaller in diameter than the cylindrical shank portion of the cleat. The insert 18 is placed against the inner side of the outsole, as shown fragmentarily in FIG. 11, with the bosses 18b fitted into the recesses 32a and with the cleats pressed through the holes 34a. Preferably a waterproof adhesive is applied to the surface portions of the inserts which will have contact with the inner surface of the outsole and to the surfaces of the bosses which will have contact with the interior surfaces of the recesses. The holes, as related above, are smaller in diameter than the cylindrical portions of the cleats so that pressure is required to force the cleats through these holes, thus providing a press-fit which effectively excludes water and dirt.

If an elevated heel is employed comprising several lifts, as shown in FIG. 15, the lift next to the top lift is provided with a recess 42b shaped to receive the insert and recesses 32a and holes 34b for receiving the bosses and cleats, and the top lift is provided with holes 340 through which the cleats extend. If a single lift is used, as shown in FIG. 15a, the top lift itself contains the recesses 42b, 32b and holes 34b. Optionally, the insert may correspond to the cross-section of the heel and may be substituted for the lift next to the top lift.

In welt shoes, such as illustrated in cross-section in FIG. 16, having an upper 10a, insole 36 and welt 38, there is a pronounced cavity 40 between the insole and the outsole which normally has to be filled with a filler, for example cork mastic, or the like. When making welt shoes the insert 18 may be substituted for the filler and thus in conjunction with the welt forms a fiat surface for receiving the outsole. Flat lasted shoes with or without insoles have a less pronounced cavity and accordingly it is desirable, as shown in FIG. 12, to provide the inner side of the outsole with a recess 42, in addition to the recesses 32a and holes 34a, which correspond in shape and thickness for receiving the platform, bosses and cleats. The recess 42 corresponds in shape and thickness to the platform 18a, the recesses 32a in diameter and thickness to the bosses and the diameters of the holes 3411 are somewhat smaller than the diameters of the cylindrical portions of the pins. FIG. 17 discloses a flat lasted shoe having an upper 10b, insole 44 and recessed outsole attached thereto. Such an outsole can be either leather or composition and the cavities, in the case of leather, may be formed by routing and in the case of composition by molding.

As related above, the heel may be provided with cleats by recessing the top lift or by recessing the lift next to the top lift and providing the top lift with holes, or optionally by replacing the lift next to the top lift by an insert corresponding in shape and cross-section to the heel.

If desired, the inserts 18 and 20 may be incorporated in a bottom formed and attached to an upper 10c by an injection molding process, as illustrated in FIG. 18, wherein the inserts 18 and 20 are completely enveloped in the bottom. Incorporation of the inserts 1'8 and 20 in the bottom may be effected in the same way as disclosed in our pending application Ser. No. 710,973, filed Mar. 6, 1968 and may comprise single layer or multiple layer construction.

Instead of forming the bottom directly to the bottom of a lasted upper which requires that the shoe manufacturer have injection molding equipment, bottom assemblies may be manufactured by manufacturers of soles and heels. For example, a composite bottom comprising an outsole and heel embodying at the forepart and heel inserts 18 and 20 may be made and supplied to the shoe manufacturer for cementing or otherwise fastening to a lasted upper. Optionally, the manufacturer may mold bottom units, with cavities 42, 42a at the forepart and heel end, and inserts 18 and 20 as shown in FIG. 19, and supply these components to the shoe manufacturer for use in making golf shoes, or he may make a composite bottom unit (FIGS. 20 and 21) embodying inserts 18 and 20 as an integral part thereof.

While injection molding is preferred in making such bottom units it is to be understood that these parts may be formed and/or joined by vulcanizing processes.

The heads of the cleats as shown contain peripherally thereof a plurality of notches 24a, the purpose of which is to provide an interlock between the plastisol and the head to prevent rotation of the head in the boss. Equivalent means may, of course, be employed for this purpose such as teeth at the peripheral edge, lugs or pins fixed to the upper and lower surfaces of the head, or holes or slots through the head, all of which provide radial shoulders.

The inserts 18 and 20 to which the cleats are attached provide a convenient means for incorporating cleats in all kinds of shoes with the advantage that the relatively thick platforms 18a, 20a from which the bosses extend afford a feeling of firm stability for the bottom of the foot and distribute the pressure at the heads of the cleats over a sutlicient area so that when the tip of any cleat or cleats strikes a hard surface or object it will not be displaced relative to the others toan extent to cause discomfort to the foot and hence the feeling of walking on spikes. In addition, the platform affords continuity throughout the entire forepart of the shoe so that there are no transverse gaps or shoulders which tend to leave the foot unsupported.

The cleats, as related above, are constructed of wearresistant alloy metal designed to last approximately throughout the normal life expectancy of the shoe itself thus avoiding the inconvenience of having to replace cleats which have become worn down and which very often, because of rusting or damage in use, become impossible to remove for the purpose of replacement.

As related above, the cleats are forced through the holes in the outsole and top lift of the heel which are smaller in diameter than the shank portions and waterproof adhesive is applied to the surfaces of the inserts and cleats and also to the portions of the outsole and heel lift with which the inserts and cleats will have contact, so that it is virtually impossible for moisture and dirt to gain access to the interior of the shoe around the cleats. Finally, because only the ground-engaging portions of the cleats extend from the tread surface of the bottom at the forepart and heel, that is because there are no surrounding metal ferrules or the like at the bottom, traction is afforded with the least amount of turf disturbance and with very little tendency to pick up moist soil so as to cause caking, a common fault of cleated shoes.

It should be understood that the present disclosure is for the purpose of illustration only and that this invention includes all modifications and equivalents falling within the scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A composite shoe bottom provided with cleats comprising an outsole having inner and outer sides and cleats projecting from the outer side, said cleats having portions extending inwardly from the outer side, and an insert disposed inwardly of the outer side to which the inwardly extending portions of the cleats are secured; characterized in that said insert has on the surface next to the outer side of the outsole a plurality of bosses of relatively large diameter the lower ends of which are spaced inwardly from the outer side and the cleats have heads of smaller diameter situated in said bosses.

2. A composite shoe bottom according to claim 1, wherein said insert comprises a uniformly thick platform corresponding substantially in shape and area to the portion of the outsole .in which it is to be incorporated.

3. A composite shoe bottom according to claim 2, wherein the portion of the insert constituting the platform is dimensionally stable yet pliable.

4. A composite shoe bottom according to claim 2, wherein the platform is approximately A; inch thick and the bosses are in the order of A of an inch in diameter and A; of an inch thick.

5. A composite shoe bottom according to claim 4, wherein the heads of the cleats are in the order of /2 inch in diameter and 1 of an inch. thick, and are em bedded within the thickness of the bosses.

6. A composite shoe bottom according to claim 1, wherein the heads of the cleats embody radially disposed shoulders.

7. A shoe bottom according to claim 1, wherein there is an insole and the insert is lodged between the outsole and the insole.

8. A composite bottom according to claim 1, wherein there is an insole and welt secured thereto to which the outsole is adapted to be attached, said welt supporting the outsole in spaced relation to the insole and defining a cavity between the insole and outsole and wherein the insert is disposed in said cavity between the insole and outsole with the cleats extending through the outsole.

9. A shoe bottom according to claim 8, wherein the outsole contains holes corresponding in number to the number of cleats, said holes being of two diameters for receiving the bosses and portions of the cleats extending therefrom, and a waterproof adhesive interposed between the interengaging surface portions of the bosses and cleats with the outsole.

10. In a fiat lasted shoe, a composite bottom according to claim 7, wherein the outsole contains at its inner side a shallow recess corresponding in area and depth to the area and thickness of the insert, and at the bottom of the recess a plurality of holes, each hole having a portion of a diameter to receive a boss and a portion of a diameter to receive a cleat.

11. A composite shoe bottom according to claim 10, wherein the outsole contains at its inner side a plurality of holes at the center of each of which is an aperture of appreciably smaller diameter than the cleats, and the insert is disposed between the insole and the outsole with the bosses seated in the holes and the cleats pressed through the apretures.

12. A composite shoe bottom according to claim 10, wherein a waterproof adhesive joins the interengaged surface portions of the recesses and bosses.

13. A composite shoe bottom according to claim 1, wherein the insert is embedded in the bottom member.

14. A composite shoe bottom according to claim 7, wherein the outsole and insole are an integral unit comprised of plastisol and the insert is embedded therein.

15. A composite shoe bottom according to claim 14, wherein the outsole and insole unit is comprised of expanded plastisol.

1 6. A composite shoe bottom according to claim 1, comprising a heel and an insert disposed inwardly of the tread surface of the top lift with the cleats extending from the tread surface of the top lift.

17. A composite shoe bottom according to claim 16, wherein the insert is recessed into the inner side of the top lift.

18. A composite shoe bottom according to claim 16, wherein the insert is recessed into the lift next to the top lift and the cleats extend through holes in the top lift.

19. A composite shoe bottom according to claim 16, wherein the insert constitutes the lift next to the top lift and the top lift contains recesses for receiving the bosses and holes for receiving the cleats.

20. An insert to which a plurality of cleats are anchored for incorporation into a shoe bottom comprising a flat plate comprised of an elastomer, said flat plate corresponding substantially in shape to the part of the 7 8 bottom into which it is to be incorporated but of slightly 1,280,302 10/ 1918 Richardson. smaller size, said flat plate having at one side a plurality 1,542,960 6/1925 Redden. of integrally formed bosses of circular cross-section, and 1 749,351 3/1930 M Q a cleat at each boss having a circular head buried in the 5 2 9 11 19 3 Schrieben boss, a cyhndrlcal shank stemming from the head and 5 2,931,110 5/1960 pietl-ocola 3 extending from the boss, and a tapered tip.

21. An insert according to claim 20, in which the Plate FOREIGN PATENTS is dimensionally stable and yet pliable. 6 8 1905 G B 22. An insert according to claim 20, wherein the 8 feat H heads of the cleats are located in a plane below the plane 10 ALFRED UEST E of the surface of the plate from which the bosses project. G Pnmary Xammer References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,243,819 10/1917 Davis.

Disclaimer 3,492,744.-L0uis E. Be'r'mle'r. Rockland, and James I. Gibli'n, Milton, Mass. GOLF SHOE AND BOTTOM THEREFOR. Patent dated Feb. 3, 1970. Disclaimer filed Apr. 30, 1970, by the assignee, 1*]. T. W right div 00., Inc. Hereby enters this disclaimer to claims 1, 7, 8 and 16 of said patent.

[Official Gazette December 8, 1.970.]

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1243819 *Jul 5, 1916Oct 23, 1917Harry L DavisCalk.
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US1749351 *Aug 23, 1928Mar 4, 1930Alexander McqueenBoot or shoe
US2658289 *Jun 21, 1951Nov 10, 1953Schrieber Herbert SFootwear calk assembly
US2931110 *Feb 26, 1957Apr 5, 1960Pietrocola RobertoSole and heel unit for shoes and the like
GB190509168A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4885851 *Dec 30, 1987Dec 12, 1989Tretorn AbShoesole for golf shoe
US5033211 *Aug 30, 1989Jul 23, 1991Macneill Engineering Company, Inc.Cleat member and slot system
US5426873 *Nov 22, 1994Jun 27, 1995Macneill Engineering Company, Inc.Cleat and process for making same
US5469644 *Jun 4, 1993Nov 28, 1995Vidler; James W.Footwear accessory
US5720118 *Mar 28, 1997Feb 24, 1998Helmut MayerInlay for a shoe
US5932336 *Apr 18, 1997Aug 3, 1999Acushnet CompanyShoe sole
US5987783 *Jun 5, 1995Nov 23, 1999Acushnet CompanyGolf shoe having spike socket spine system
US6092307 *Jan 25, 1999Jul 25, 2000Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Self-locating sole
US6176025May 28, 1999Jan 23, 2001Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Cushioning system for golf shoes
US6289611May 28, 1999Sep 18, 2001Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Golf shoe outsole with bio-mechanically positioned wear bars
US6381875Jan 16, 2001May 7, 2002Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Cushioning system for golf shoes
US6467191Jun 19, 2001Oct 22, 2002As/Cs Corp.Air ventilation structure of shoe sole
US6694647May 26, 1999Feb 24, 2004Etonic Worldwide LlcBio-mechanically extended heel for golf shoe
US6954998 *Aug 2, 2000Oct 18, 2005Adidas International Marketing B.V.Chassis construction for an article of footwear
US7418791 *Oct 10, 2002Sep 2, 2008Cole Iii Charles DApparatus and methods for imbedded rubber outer
US7832117Jul 17, 2006Nov 16, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear including full length composite plate
WO1991003183A1 *Aug 28, 1990Mar 21, 1991Macneill Eng Co IncCleat member and slot system
WO1996039059A1 *May 30, 1996Dec 12, 1996Acushnet CoGolf shoe having spike socket spine system
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/59.00R, 264/44, 36/134, 264/244, 36/127, 36/30.00R, 264/277
International ClassificationA43C15/16, A43C15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43C15/167
European ClassificationA43C15/16C1B