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Publication numberUS3493052 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 3, 1970
Filing dateJun 20, 1968
Priority dateJun 20, 1968
Publication numberUS 3493052 A, US 3493052A, US-A-3493052, US3493052 A, US3493052A
InventorsBoehm Gail M, Evans Robert T
Original AssigneeHalliburton Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for manipulating a valve in a well packer
US 3493052 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

sheets-sheet 1 ATTORNEYS Feb. 3, 1970 R. T. EvANs .ETAL

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MANIPULATING A VALVE IN `A WELL PACKER Filed June 2o. 196e Feb. 3, 1970 3,493,052

' METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MANIPULATING A VALVE IN A WEL-.L PArcKER Fired June 2o. 196s R. 1'. EVANS ETAL 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEYS United States Patent O 3,493,052 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MANIPULATING A VALVE IN A WELL PACKER Robert T. Evans and Gail M. Boehm, Duncan, Okla.,

assignors to Halliburton Company, Duncan, Okla., a

corporation of Delaware Filed .lune 20, 1968, Ser. No. 738,521 Int. Cl. E21b 33/12 U.S. Cl. 166-315 10 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Method and apparatus for operating a spool valve in a well packer where movement of the valve actuating means is impeded by frictional engagement between the actuating means and the wall of a well. A lifting force is imposed on the actuating means at least equal to the frictional force impeding movement of the actuating movement of the actuating means. A valve actuating downwardly directed force is exerted on the actuating means, which force is in excess of the upwardly applied force.

GENERAL BACKGROUND, OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In performing various operations in wells, a well tool is positioned within a well bore and an actuating mechanism subsequently lowered through the Well bore to engage and operate the well tool.

For example, in cementing operations, a valve packer is positioned in a well bore. In order to transmit cement to the packer for passage through the packer to an isolated formation zone, a conduit string is extended downwardly from a wellhead and coupled with a valved conduit portion of the packer. Cement flowing through the packer is controlled by a valve, the position of which is determined by longitudinal movement of the conduit string.

Before the cementing operation is commenced, i.e., before cement is transmitted through the conduit string and packer to the formation, it is desirable to close the packer valve and pressure-test the conduit string. This testing insures that, during high-pressure cementing, cement will not escape through leaks in the conduit string and cement the conduit string in the well bore above the packer. Excessive leakage, of course, would also signicantly reduce the pressure of the cementing fluid so as to reduce the efficiency of the cementing operation.

The position of the conduit string, which determines the position of the valve within the packer, is detectable at a wellhead in accordance with conduit string movements ascertainable at the wellhead and variations in longitudinal force acting on the conduit string as valve actuating elements become engaged or separated.

Such wellhead observations become extraordinarily confused and difficult to evaluate where operations are conducted in crooked or deviated holes. Such crooked or deviated holes may include a longitudinal axis which departs in various directions from a straight longitudinal axis. It is not unknown, for example, to encounter deviations in hole straightness of such a magnitude as to yield a more or less corkscrew configuration.

A conduit string passing downwardly through a deviated or crooked hole will frictionally engage the wall of the hole to a substantial degree. In many instances, the frictional force imposed on the conduit string will increase as the conduit string progresses further into the hole because of increased areal contact between the outer periphery of the conduit string and the wall of the well. Thus, in deep, crooked holes, the frictional force, imped- 3,493,052 Patented F eb. 3, 1970 ing movement of a conduit string, will often be greater than that in shallow bore holes.

The level of this frictional force is often so high as to'make it impossible at a wellhead to determine if conduit movements or changes in force acting on the conduit are a result of valve manipulations or are merely a result of `the frictional interaction between the conduit string and deviated portions of the bore hole.

It thus is a basic object-of the present invention to provide a method and apparatus for manipulating well tools in either straight or deviated holes so as to nullify the'adverse eects of frictional interengagement between the tool actuating means and the Wall of the well bore.

It is a further object of the invention to provide such a method and apparatus which requires the imposition of movement inducing force on a tool-actuating means which force exceeds the level of frictional forces so that an operator can be assured that the frictional forces do not control actuating means movement or changes in force acting on the actuating means.

`It is yet another object of the invention to provide such a method and apparatus wherein the level of force required to be exerted by an operator on a tool actuating means will increase as the actuating means moves deeper into a well bore so as to tend to ensure the continuous imposition of operating force on the actuating means in excess of frictional forces acting on the actuating means, which frictional forces would tend to increase with the well depth.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide such methods and apparatus which provide, at the wellhead, a positive indication that an actuating means is in the vicinity lmeans of a well tool to be actuated, even though the actuating means is capable of undergoing continued movement.

A related object of the invention is to provide such methods and apparatus characterized by basic structural simplicity and operational reliability and substantial resistance to the deleterious effects of corrosive fluids in a bore hole.

In accomplishing the major portion of these objectives, there is presented through the invention a method 0f operating a well tool where the well tool is xedly positioned in a portion of a bore hole. A tool actuating means is lowered through the bore hole, with frictional engagement between the actuating means and the wall of the bore hole imposing a frictional force on the actuating means tending to impede movement of the actuating means. An upward force is applied to the actuating means at the general vicinity of the well tool. A downward force is applied to the actuating means in excess of the upward force, to cause the actuating means to move downwardly and actuate the well tool.

A further and independently significant aspect of the invention involves this method concept wherein the upwardly applied force is hydraulic in nature and is applied as a consequence of engagement between the actuating means and the well tool.

A still further and independently significant aspect of the invention involves this composite method concept further augmented by the application of the hydraulic force in general proportion to the pressure of well iluid in the vicinity of the actuating means.

Additional independently significant aspects of the invention entail apparatus combinations operable to perform the foregoing methods. Particular significance is attached to a basic actuating means structurally characterized by a conduit string which supports valve actuating means and a sleeve-like housing telescopingly mounted on the exterior of the conduit string. Differences in area of fluid reaction surface means carried by the conduit string and sleeve means enable the sleeve means to engage a )dy portion of a packer, with the hydrostatic pressure E well uid being operable to resist continued downward lovement of the conduit string as a function of this area iiference.

DRAWINGS In describing the invention, reference will be made to preferred embodiment shown in the application drawlgs.

In the drawings: FIGURE 1 schematically illustrates the actuating leans of the present invention being lowered througlih well bore toward a site where a retrievable valved acker is set, i.e., xedly positioned;

FIGURE 2 provides a vertically sectioned View of the 'IGURE 1 components, illustrating these components fhen a sleeve carried by a conduit string of the actuating leans has initially engaged the body of the valved ack-er;

FIGURE 3 provides a vertically sectioned view of the IGURE 1 components, illustrating the conduit string fter it has moved downwardly beyond the FIGURE 2 osition to eifect the opening of the valve within the alved packer;

FIGURE 4 provides an enlarged, vertically sectioned iew of the FIGURE l components showing the disposiion of these components as the sleeve of the actuating leans is about to engage the packer body;

FIGURE 5 provides a similarly enlarged, sectional iew of the components of the assembly, disposed as hown generally in FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 6 provides an external view of the packer aolve actuating means of the FIGURE 1 assembly;

FIGURE 7 provides a sectional View taken on the ine 7 7 of FIGURE 5".

EXAMPLE OF WELL SERVICE TO BE PERFORMED FIGURES 1, 2 and 3 schematically illustrate the manler in which the present invention may be adapted to he pressure testing of a cement injection system.

As shown in FIGURE 1, a packer 1 has been set or ixedly positioned in a portion of a bore hole 2. Packer includes a generally cylindrical or tubular body 3 and .n annular, elastomeric packing means 4.

As shown in FIGURE 1, packing means 4 has been :ontracted axially and expanded radially outwardly into ingagement with the wall 5 of the well bore 2.

As shown in the sectional views of FIGURES 2 and 3, t generally tubular slide valve 6 is telescopingly mounted vithin a cylinder portion 7 of packer body 3. Spool or ubular valve 6 is provided with one or more ports 8, vhile cylinder portion 7 of body 3 is provided with one r more ports 9.

As shown in FIGURE 2, the valve 6 is disposed in an lpper position, with the ports 8 and 9 axially separated und mutually sealed from each other. With this arran-genent, fluid communication between the well annulus zone L0, beneath the packer 1, and the interior passage 11 of `he packer body 3 and spool valve 6 is blocked.

Downward movement of the valve 6 serves, as shown n FIGURE 3`, to bring the port means 8 and 9 into adially aligned relationship so as to provide fluid comnunication between the zones and 11.

As will here be appreciated, the packer means 1 has )een schematically illustrated. In order to avoid ob- :curing the present invention, structural details of the eating mechanism, slips, wedges, expanding shoes have )een deleted. Suffice it to here indicate that a packer rssembly, consistent with the illustrated application of he present invention comprises an E Z Drill S.V. queeze Packer manufactured by the Halliburton Com- :any of Duncan, Okla.

As shown in FIGURES 1, 2, and 3, a valve actuating tool 12 is lowered from a wellhead through a bore hole 2 on a conduit string 13.

The function of actuating means 12 is to sealingly engage the packer means 3, pressure test the conduit string 13, and subsequently enable fluid to be pumped under high pressure from a wellhead, through the conduit string 13 and packer passage 11, and outwardly through the aligned ports 8 and 9 into the zone 10 for a squeeze cementing operation.

Pressure testing is accomplished with the valve 6 shown in the upper or closed position illustrated in FIGURE y2. Cement is injected through the conduit string 13 and into the zone 11 when the valve 6 is in the lower position illustrated in FIGURE 3.

As shown schematically in FIGURES 1, 2 and 3, the actuating tool comprises a support means or central conduit portion 14 and a sleeve-like cylindrical member or movable means 15 telescoping mounted on the exterior of conduit portion 14. This conduit portion may be considered an integral part of conduit string 13.

Sleeve 15 is operable to move telescopingly on conduit string 14 within limits defined by abutment means 16 and 17. Abutment means 16 is operable to engage the upper end 18 of sleeve 15 so as to limit downward movement of conduit 1-4 relative to sleeve 15. Abutment means 17, formed on the interior of sleeve 15 functions as a cylinder head operable to engage a piston-like shoulder 19 formed on the exterior of conduit 14 and thereby limit upward movement of the conduit 14 relative to the sleeve 13.

As shown in FIGURE 3, generally annular shoulder or piston 19 is operable to move longitudinally and telescopingly through an annular 0r cylinder-like cavity 20 extending longitudinally downwardly from cylinder head 17.

To effect the previously discussed sequence of pressure testing and cement injection operations, the actuating means 12 is lowered toward the fixedly positioned or previously set packer 1 as shown in FIGURE l.

The lower end 21 of cylinder 15 is brought into abutting engagement with the upper end 22 of the packer body 3 as shown generally in FIGURE 2. At the point shown in FIGURE 2', where the lower sleeve end 21 first engages the upper end 22 of the packer body 3, the lower extremity 23 of the conduit 14 is in the general vicinity of the spool valve 6 but has not engaged the spool valve 6 for movement inducing purposes.

With the components disposed as shown in FIGURE 2, continued downward movement of the conduit 14 will be effected with the operator at a wellhead observing that a substantial lifting force is acting on the lower end of the conduit string 14. This lifting force results from a difference in iluid reaction surfaces in the actuating means 12, which difference serves to produce a net lifting force acting on the lower end of the conduit string 14 and a net downwardly directed force acting on the sleeve 15 in response to the pressure of well bore fluid in the annular zone 24 generally adjacent the actuating sleeve 15. A more detailed discussion of this fluid reaction phenomena will be presented subsequently.

It is suicient here to say that the reaction force acting upwardly on the lower end of the conduit string 14 exceeds the frictional force acting on the conduit 13 as a result of engagement between the exterior of the conduit 13 and crooked or deviated portions of the well bore Wall 5.

Thus, continued downward movement of the conduit 14, beyond the position illustrated in FIGURE 2, can be effected only when the force acting downwardly on the conduit string 13 exceeds the frictional force tending to impede movement of this conduit string.

As the lower conduit portion 23 moves downwardly, an abutment 25 at the lower extremity of the conduit 14 engages an annular seat 25 formed on the interior of the spool valve 6. With the abutments 25 and 26 thus engaged, continued downward movement of the conduit 14 will cause circumferentially spaced resilient finger-like latches 27, carried at the upper end of the sleeve 26, to be cammed radially inwardly by engagement between latch cam lugs 27a and a camming shoulder 28 formed on the interior of conduit body 3. This inward camming of the latching fingers 27 will cause radially inwardly facing latching lugs 29, carried at the upper extremity of the fingers 27, to latchingly engage a portion of the annular recess 30 formed on the outer extremity of the lower portion 23 of the conduit 14.

Movement of the thus interlatched conduit 14 and spool valve 6 will continue until the abutment 16 engages the abutment 18. This engagement, coupled with engagement between the abutments 21 and 22, will determine the extremity of lower movement of the latched valve 6 and conduit 14. At this lowermost movement extremity, the ports 8 and 9 will be radially aligned as shown in FIG- URE 3.

Upward movement of the interlatched conduit string 14 and valve 6 sufficient to close the packer valve may be effected merely by raising the conduit string 13 through an axial increment sufficient to restore the valve 6 to a closed position. Complete withdrawal of the conduit 14 from the valve 6 may be effected by continued upward movement of the conduit string 14 sufficient to return the camming lugs 27a to an annular recess 31 located immediately above the camming shoulder 28. Recess 31 extends radially outwardly of the interior of the packer body 3. Once the camming lugs 27a are brought into radial alignment with this recess 31, these lugs, because of the resilience of the fingers 27, will flex radially outwardly and simultaneously latch the valve 6 in a closed position and free the latching lugs 29 from engagement with the recess 30` of the conduit 14.

With conduit 14 telescopingly inserted within the interior of packer body 3, an annular seal or gasket 32 pro- Vides sealing engagement between the conduit 14 and the packer body 3. However, this gasket 32 enables telescoping movement of the conduit 14 relative to the packer body 3 to take place.

With the apparatus components disposed as shown in FIGURE 2, i.e., with the conduit 14 sealingly engaged with the packer body 3, uid within the conduits 13 and 14 may be pressurized to pressure test the tubing 13 for leaks.

This test may be conducted when the sleeve initially engages the packer body upper end 22 i.e., without manip-1 ulating the valve 6, if the valve 6 is known to be in an upper or closed position. In order to ensure this valve position, it may be desirable to manipulate the conduit string, first downwardly then upwardly, to move the valve 6 to an open position and restore it to a closed position.

After the tubing test has been conducted, the conduit string 14 is moved downwardly to dispose the spool valve 6 in the open position shown in FIGURE 3. With the spool valve open, cement may then be injected, under high pressure, through the conduit string 13 and conduit 4 and packer body 3, to ow outwardly from the packer passage 11 through the aligned ports 8 and 9 and into the annular zone 10.

With the basic mode of operation of the invention having been described, it now becomes appropriate to consider structural details.

STRUCTURAL AND OPERATIONAL DETAILS Structural details of the apparatus are illustrated in FIGURES 4 through 7. f.

As there` shown, conduit 14, which may be considered as the lower end of conduit string 13, comprises a generally cylindrical, lowermost member 14a. Lower portion 14a has an externally threaded upper end 14b. This upper end 14b is threadedly connected with a female threaded coupling portion 14C formed at the lower end of an upper portion 14d of conduit means 14. As illustrated, conduit portion 14d supports and defines the piston-like abutment 19.

Conventional, threaded pipe coupling means 14e serve to connect conduit portion 14d to the portion of conduit string 13 which provides the abutment or stop 16.

As shown in FIGURES 4 and 5, cylinder 20 is defined by a cylindrical wall 20a which extends axially downwardly from the generally frustoconical cylinder head wall 17.

For purposes of conforming engagement, piston defining abutment 19 is also frustoconically configured. Thus; downward movement of sleeve 15 on conduit 14 is limited by more or less conforming engagement between the abutment means 17 and 19.

The upper end of cylinder 20 is closed by engagement between conduit means 14 and a generally cylindrical wall 33. This wall 33 extends axially upwardly from the inner edge 17a of cylinder head 17. One or more O-ring type seals 34 may be provided to enhance the seal between wall 33 and an axially extending, generally mating cylindrical wall 35 formed on conduit portion 14d.

Piston 19 is defined by generally frustoconical and radially outwardly extending wall 19a and by a cylindrical side wall 36. Cylindrical wall 36 is telescopingly and sealingly engaged with the cylinder wall 20a. Sealing between the walls 36 and 20a may be enhanced by one or more O-ring type gaskets 37a carried by the cylindrical wall 36.

As shown, cylindrical walls 36 and 20a are generally of the same diameter, with this same diameter being somewhat larger than the generally same diameter of the mating walls 33 and 35.

This difference in diameter provides a differential annular cross-sectional area A, shown in FIGURE 7. Area A determines the level of well bore uid induced pressure which acts upwardly on the lower end of conduit means 14 and downwardly on the sleeve means 15.

As will here be understood, the tool components are assembled so that there is little or no air in the cylinder chamber 37 when the tool is in the contracted position shown in FIGURE 4.

When the tool is moved to the extended position shown in FIGURE 5, there will be some tendency to produce a vacuum in the cavity 37. The level of vacuum induced forces generated within the cavity 37 are of such small consequence that they may be ignored in the context 0f the well bore fluid generated pressures.

As shown in FIGURES 4, 5 and 6, one or more ports 38 extend radially through the upper end of sleeve means 25 above the seals 34 so as to expose the upper sleeve end and the upper end of wall 35 to the pressure of well bore fiuid.

Somewhat similarly, one or more radially extending ports 39 intersect the lower end of sleeve means 15 and provide fluid communication between well bore uid and the lower end of sleeve 15 and the lower end of wall 36.

It will thus be apparent that with the abutment means 21 and 22 abuttingly engaged, the pressure of well bore iiuid adjacent the sleeve 15 will exert a net lifting force on the conduit means 14. In this connection, it will be noted, by reference to FIGURES 4 and 5, that abutment means 21 and 22 may each be frustoconically configured so as to facilitate generally mating engagement.

The diameter of wall 20a will be determinative of the upwardly directed force exerted by well bore uid pressure on the conduit means 14 by way of lthe port means 38. The smaller diameter of wall 35 will be determinative of downwardly directed uid pressure exerted by the pressure of well bore fiuids on the conduit means 14 by way of the ports 38.

The difference in cross-sectional area between the circular cross sections, defined by walls 35 and 20a, provides le differential area A which is determinative of the net Eting force which well bore fluid pressure will exert on 1e conduit means 14. For practical purposes, this area A lay be viewed as the cross-sectional area of the annular iston 19, i.e., the annular cross-sectional area of the iston means 19 extending between the walls 35 and 36. his cross-sectional area, of course, for practical purposes ray be viewed as being the same as the cross-sectional rea of the annular cylinder means 20 existing between the 'alls 33 and 20a.

These practical approaches to piston cross-sectional rea and cylinder cross-sectional -area ignore the fairly inonsequential clearance `gaps between mating cylinder and iston surfaces.

Here again, from the standpoint of making practical omputations, the hydrostatic pressure of well bore fluid cting on conduit means 14, by way of ports 38, may be iewed as being the same as the hydrostatic pressure of /ell bore fluid acting on conduit means 14 by way of ort means 39. This practical approach ignores the differnce in elevation of port means 3-8 and 39, but this diference in elevation is of immaterial consequence in the ontext of the well depth where the sleeve means will ie operating.

At this point, some reference may be made to the hange in forces imposed on the conduit means 14 and tring 13 as a result of engagement between the sleeve ybutment 21 and the packer body abutment 22.

As the actuating means 12, which may be viewed as ncluding the sleeve 15 and the conduit string 13 with its ontinuation portion 14, is lowered through a well bore, he differential area induced fluid pressure forces acting n sleeve 15 will offset the differential area induced uid ressure forces acting on the conduit 14. This offsetting of orces is a consequence of the engagement between the tbutments 19 and 17. However, once the abutments 21 rnd 22 are brought into full engagement, the ability of he differential area forces acting on sleeve 15, to offset he differential area forces acting on the conduit means L4, is nullied. Thus, continued downward movement of yhe conduit means 14, once the abutment means 21 and 52 are fully engaged, takes place with differential area nduced fluid pressure forces acting effectively upward )n the conduit means 14. Thus, at a wellhead, an operator vill be able to ascertain when the abutments means 21 tnd 22 have become engaged because the weight indicator tt the wellhead connected with the conduit string 13 vill indicate an apparent lessening in the weight of the :onduit string. This apparent lessening of course, will lesult from the differential area fluid generating force tcting on the conduit means 14.

To offset this string lightening it will be necessary for the operator at the wellhead to place a greater down- Nardly directed load on the conduit string 13. This would generally be effected by reducing the extent to which a :onduit string supporting device exerts an upward restrain- ,ng force on the upper end of the conduit string 13.

Here again, it will be appreciated that the invention is specifically contemplated for operation in deviated or :rooked holes where the differential area induced, hydrostatic force acting on the conduit means 14 will be of auch a level as to at least equal and preferably exceed '.he anticipated frictional force acting between the crooked wall of the well bore and the exterior of the conduit string 13. For example, if it is anticipated that the frictional force will be on the order of up to about five thousand pounds, the cross-sectional area A may be such as to provide a differential area-induced lifting force acting on the conduit means 14 on the order of magnitude of sixtytwo hundred pounds.

Significantly, this force may be produced with an extremely small area A. With a cross-sectional area A as small as one square inch, and with the sleeve 15 being disposed in a well bore beneath about one thousand feet of conventional drilling mud, this level of differential area force would be produced.

-By manipulating the conduit string 14 for valve movement purposes at a force level above that required to overcome frictional force, an operator can be sure that conduit string movements and variations in conduit string force detected at the wellhead are not being governed, or induced by, frictional interaction between the well bore and the conduit string.

SUMMARY vOF ADVANTAGES AND SCOPE OF INVENTION A principal advantage of the invention resides in the provision of an apparatus and method for enabling well bore manipulations to be effected while obviating interference from friction induced forces.

Another major advantage of the invention resides in the provision of a well tool actuating apparatus and method which provides an indication that an actuating component is near a well tool even though the actuating component is able to continue movement toward the well tool. Thus, prior to the time that the conduit abutment 25 engages the sleeve valve abutment 26, the engagement between the abutments 21 and 22 will enable the differential area A to commence to produce an effective hydraulic force acting upwardly on the conduit means 14.

It is also significant to here note that the differential area generated force will increase with the operating level of the sleeve means 15. Thus, in deeper wells, where greater frictional force would be anticipated, a higher differential area-induced lifting force acting on the conduit means 14 will result.

It is also noteworthy that the differential area induced lifting force does not become effective until the sleeve 15 actually engages the packer 1. Thus, during the initial lowering operation, the differential area effect does not impede conduit string movements.

The structurally simple nature of the conduit means 14 and the sleeve means 15 contributes to basic ease of fabrication, ease of maintenance, and ruggedness. Such ruggedness contributes to operational reliability. The nature of the components is such as to minimize vulnerability of the apparatus to corrosion and clogging.

In describing te invention reference has been made to a preferred embodiment. However, those skilled in the well tool art and familiar with the disclosure of the invention may envision additions, deletions, substitutions or other modifications which would fall within the purview of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. method of operating a well tool, said method comprislng:

xldlly positioning a well tool in a portion of a bore lowering tool actuating means through said bore hole, with frictional engagement between said actuating means and the wall of said well bore imposing a frictional force on said actuating means tending to impede movement of said actuating means when said actuating means is in the general vicinity of said well tool; causing the application of an upward force to said actuating means, at the general vicinity of said well tool, at least equal to said frictional force; and,

applying a downward force to said actuating means in excess of said upward force to cause said actuating means to move downwardly and actuate said well tool.

2. A method of operating a well tool, said method comprising:

fixedly positioning a well tool in a portion of a deviated bore hole;

lowering tool actuating means through said deviated bore hole, with frictional engagement between said actuating means and the wall of said well `bore imposing a frictonal force on said actuating means tending to impede movement of said actuating means when said actuating means is in the general vicinity of said well tool;

engaging said actuating means with at least a portion of said well tool and thereby causing the application of an upwardly directed hydraulic force to said actuating means in response to engagement between said actuating means and said well tool, with said upwardly directed force being at least equal to said frictional force;

applying a downwardly directed force to said actuating means in excess of said upwardly directed force to cause said actuating means to move downward and actuate said well tool.

3. A method of operating a valve in a well tool, said method comprising:

fixedly positioning a valved well tool in a portion of a deviated bore hole;

lowering tool actuating means including a conduit string through said deviated bore hole, with frictional engagement between said actuating means and the wall of said well bore imposing a frictional force on said actuating means tending to impede movement of said actuating means when said actuating means is in the general vicinity of said well tool;

engaging said actuating means with at least a portion of said well tool and thereby causing the application of an upwardly directed hydraulic force to said actuating means, in response to engagement between said actuating means and said well tool and in proportion to the pressure of well fluid in the vicinity of said actuating means, with said upwardly directed force being at least equal to said friction force; and

applying a downwardly directed force to said actuating means in excess of said upwardly directed force to cause said actuating means to move downward and actuate a valve in said well tool.

4. A well tool apparatus comprising:

a well tool xedly positioned in a portion of a bore hole and having actuatable means associated therewith;

tool actuating means operable to be lowered through said bore hole, with frictional engagement between said actuating means and the wall of said well bore imposing a frictional force on said actuating means tending to impede movement of said actuating means when said actuating means is in the general vicinity of said well tool;

means for applying an upward force to said actuating means, at the general vicinity of said well tool, at least equal to said frictional force; and

means for applying a downward force to said actuating means in excess of, and during the application of, said upward force to cause said actuating means to move downwardly and actuate said actuatable means associated with said well tool.

5. A well tool apparatus comprising:

a well tool xedly positioned in a portion of a deviated bore hole and having actuatable means associated therewith;

tool actuating means operable to be lowered through said deviated bore hole, with frictional engagement between said actuating means and the wall of said well bore imposing a frictional force on said actuating means tending to impede movement of said actuating means when said actuating means is in the general vicinity of said well tool;

means for applying an upwardly directed hydraulic force to said actuating means in response to engagement between said actuating means and said well tool, with said upwardly directed force being at least equal to said frictional force; and

means for applying a downwardly directed force to said actuating means in excess, and during application of, said upwardly directed force to cause said actuating means to move downward and actuate said actuatable means associated with said well tool.

6. A well tool apparatus comprising:

a well tool ixedly positioned in a portion of a deviated bore hole and having an actuatable valve means therein;

tool actuating means including a conduit string operable to be lowered through said deviated bore hole, with frictional engagement between said actuating means and the wall of said well bore imposing a frictional force on said actuating means tending to impede movement of said actuating means when said actuating means is in the general vicinity of said well tool;

means for applying an upwardly directed hydraulic force to said actuating means, in response to engagement between said actuating means and said well tool and in proportion to the pressure of well fluid in the vicinity of said actuating means, with said upwardly directed force being at least equal to said friction force; and

means for applying a downwardly directed force to said actuating means in excess of said upwardly directed force to cause said actuating means to move downward and actuate said valve means in said well tool.

7. An apparatus for performing operations in a well,

said apparatus comprising:

well tool means xedly positioned in a well bore and having tool actuating means associated therewith; operating means including support means disposed in said well bore and operable to be lowered through said well bore from a wellhead, said support means including means for engaging and operating said tool actuating means, movable means mounted for longitudinal movement on said support means, rst abutment means operable to provide forcetransmitting engagement between said well tool means and said movable means, second abutment means operable to normally maintain said movable means in downward forcetransmitting engagement with said support means in the absence of force-transmitting engagement between said well tool means and said movable means, and iluid reaction means interposed between said support means and said movable means and operable, in response to force-transmitting engagement between said well tool means and said first movable means, to impede downward movement of said support means relative to said movable means as a function of the pressure of fluid in said well bore adjacent said movable means, said fluid reaction means comprising:

annular piston means projecting generally laterally of a portion of said support means, generally annular cylinder means extending generally longitudinally of and carried by said movable means, and said movable means being mounted on said support means, with said annular cylinder means telescopingly receiving said annular piston means, said annular piston means facing generally upwardly, with the interior of said cylinder means being substantially isolated from the direct communication with uid in said well bore, and with upper and lower ends of Said movable means being exposed to said fluid, fluid reaction surface means on said support means and on said movable means operable, respectively, to impart upwardly directed, fluid pressure generated force to said support means and downwardly directed fluid pressure generated force to said movable means corresponding generally to the means corresponding generally to the product of the mutually identical effective crosssectional areas of said piston means and cylinder means multiplied by the pressure of said well bore fluid adjacent said sleeve product of the effective cross-sectional area 5 means; and of said piston means multiplied by the pressaid first abutment means being operable in response to sure of said well bore fluid adjacent said force-transmitting engagement between said central movable means; and conduit means of said packer means and said sleeve said first abutment means being operable in remeans to cause said fluid reaction surface means to sponse to force-transmitting engagement beexert a lifting force on said conduit String generally tween said well tool means and said movable in proportion to pressure of Well bore fluid adjacent means to cause said fluid reaction surface means said sleeve means. to exert a lifting force on said support means 9. An apparatus for operating well tool means fixedly generally in proportion to pressure of well bore positioned in a well bore and having tool actuating means fluid adjacent said movable means. associated therewith, said apparatus comprising: 8. An apparatus for performing operations in a well, operating means including aid apparatus comprising: support means disposed in said well bore and oppacker means fixedly positioned in a well bore and inerable to be lowered through said well bore cluding from a wellhead, said support means including central conduit means, means for engaging and operatin-g said tool packer means securing said central conduit means actuating means,

to a wall portion of said well bore, and movable means mounted for longitudinal movevalve means mounted for reciprocable movement ment on said support means,

within said central conduit means and operable first abutment means operable to provide forceto control fluid flow from the interior to the extransmitting engagement between said well tool terior of said central conduit means, means and said movable means, operating means including second abutment means operable to normally a conduit string disposed in said well bore and opmaintain said movable means in down-ward erable to be lowered through said well bore from force-transmitting engagement with said supa wellhead, said conduit string including means port means in the absence of force-transmitting for engaging and reciprocating said valve means, engagement between said well tool means and sleeve means mounted for telescoping longitudinal said movable means, and

movement on said conduit string, fluid reaction means interposed between said suplrst abutment means operable to provide forceport means and said movable means and opertransmitting engagement between said central able, in response to force-transrriitting engageconduit means and said sleeve means, ment between said well tool means and said second abutment means operable to normally movable means, to impede downward movement maintain said sleeve means in downward forceof said support means relative to said movable transmitting engagement with said conduit string means as a function of the pressure of fluid in in the absence of force-transmitting engagement said well bore adjacent said movable means, between said central conduit means and said said fluid reaction means comprising sleeve means; and annular piston means projecting generally fluid reaction means interposed between said conlaterally of a portion of said support means, duit string and said sleeve means and operable, generally annular cylinder means extending in response to force-transmitting engagement begenerally longitudinally of and carried by tween said central conduit means and said sleeve said movable means, and means, to impede downward movement of said said movable means being mounted on said conduit string relative to said sleeve means as support means, with said lannular cylinder a function of the pressure of fluid in said well means telescopingly receiving said annular bore adjacent said sleeve means, piston means, Said luld reaction means Comprising y said annular piston means facing generally annular Pisten nleanS Projecting generally outupwardly, with the interior of said cylinder Wardly 0f the eXterlOr 0f a Portion of said means being substantially isolated from the cOndnlt String, direct communication with fluid in said generally annular Cylinder means eXtendng well bore, and with upper and lower ends of generally longitudinally 0f and Carried by, said movable means being exposed to said the inner periphery of said sleeve means, Huid, and fluid reaction surface means on said support said sleeve means being mounted on the exmeans and on said movable means Open terior of 'said conduit string, with said anable respectively, to impart upwardly di llu1ar.cyhnder mans telescopmgly recelvrected, fluid pressure generated to force .mg Sald annular p1ston means said support means and downwardly directsaid annular piston means facing generally V ed, fluid pressure generated force to said upwardly, with the interior of said cylinder 1 d. u means being substantially isolated from the movab e means Corresp 01.1 mg genera .y to direct communication with fluid in said well the Product of :the effectlve Crossfsetlonal bore, and with upper and lower ends of said area :of Sad plstfm means multlphd by sleeve means being exposed to Said fluid, the pressure of said well bore fluid adjacent fluid reaction surface means on said conduit Said movable means', and

string and on said sleeve means operable, said first abutment means being operable in response respectively, to impart upwardly directed, to force-transmitting enga-gement between said well fluid pressure generated force to said contool means and said movable means to cause said duit string and downwardly directed fluid fluid reaction surface means to exert a lifting force pressure generated force to said sleeve on said support means generally in proportion to pressure of well bore fluid adjacent said movable means.

10. An apparatus for operating a valve in a packer means xedly positioned in a well bore and including central conduit means, packer means securing said central conduit means to a wall portion of said well bore, and valve means mounted for reciprocable movement within said central conduit means and operable to control uid ow from the interior to the exterior of said central conduit means, said apparatus comprising:

operatin-g means including a conduit string disposed in said well bore and operable to be lowered through said well bore from a wellhead, said lconduit string including means for engaging and reciprocating said valve means,

sleeve means mounted for telescoping longitudinal movement on said conduit string,

first abutment means operable to provide forcetransmitting engagement between said central conduit means and said sleeve means,

second abutment means operable to normally maintain said sleeve means in downward forcetransmitting engagement with said conduit string in the absence of force-transmitting engagement between said central conduit means and said sleeve means, and

uid reaction means interposed between said conduit string and said sleeve means and operable, in response to force-transmitting engagement between said central conduit means and said sleeve means, to impede downward movement of said conduit string relative tosaid sleeve means as a function of the pressure of fluid in said well bore adjacent said sleeve means,

said fluid reaction means comprising annular piston means projecting generally outwardly of the exterior of a portion of said conduit string,

generally annular cylinder means extending generally longitudinally of, and carried by, the inner periphery of said sleeve means, and

said sleeve means being mounted on the exterior of said conduit string, with said annular cylinder means telescopingly receiving said annular piston means, said annular piston means facing generally upwardly, with the interior of said cylinder means being substantially isolated from the direct communication with fluid in said well bore and with upper and lower ends of said sleeve means being exposed to said uid, uid reaction surface means on said conduit string and on said sleeve means operable,

respectively, to impart upwardly directed, fluid pressure generated force to said conduit string and downwardly directed uid pressure generated force to said slee-ve means corresponding generally to the product of the mutually identical, elective cross-sectional areas of said piston means and cylinder means multiplied by the pressure of said well bore uid adjacent said sleeve means; and said lirst abutment means being operable in response to force-transmitting engagement between said central conduit means of said packer means and said `sleeve means to cause said uid reaction surface means to exert a lifting force on said conduit string generally in proportion to pressure of fluid in said well -bore generally adjacent said sleeve means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,416,842 3/1947 iOLeary 166-133 X 2,740,479 3/ 1956 Sch-Wegman 166-224 X 3,151,839 10/1964 Mott 166-226 X 3,249,124 5/1966 Berryman 166-226 X 3,329,209 7/1967 Kisling 166-128 3,422,896 1/1969 Nutter 166-150 X CHARLES E. OCONN'ELL, Primary Examiner IAN A. CALVERT, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. 166-152, 224

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Classifications
U.S. Classification166/373, 166/152, 166/332.1, 166/387
International ClassificationE21B33/13, E21B34/14, E21B34/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B34/14, E21B33/13
European ClassificationE21B33/13, E21B34/14