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Publication numberUS3494536 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 10, 1970
Filing dateDec 7, 1967
Priority dateDec 7, 1967
Publication numberUS 3494536 A, US 3494536A, US-A-3494536, US3494536 A, US3494536A
InventorsJames W Henry
Original AssigneeFinn Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-forming closed carton
US 3494536 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 10, 1970 J. HE-NRY I 3,494,536

SELF-FORMING CLOSED CARTON Filed Dec. 7. 1967 INVENTOR. uAMEs n4 HENRY A TTORNE Y5 United States Patent 3,494,536 SELF-FORMING CLOSED CARTON James W. Henry, Jacksonville, Fla., assignor to The Finn Industries, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Delaware Filed Dec. 7, 1967, Ser. No. 688,722 Int. Cl. B65d 5/10, 5/36; A61b 19/02 US. Cl. 229-39 1 Claim ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates, in general, to disposable cartons and, in particular, to disposable cartons which are self-forming. More particularly still, it relates to cartons of the latter type which are adapted to receive articles to be disposed of therein in a fashion such that the articles cannot be removed, without collapsing, or destroying the carton.

Cartons of the above type will be extremely useful in hospitals, doctors offices and elsewhere, for disposing of articles such as tongue depressors, throw-away hypodermic needles and the like, which are intended for use only once. Cases where articles of these types are inadvertently used more than once and on different patients do not occur too frequently or on a regular basis, however, they do occur sufficiently often so that extreme precautionary measures are taken to assure that they do not. The serious and sometimes fatal injury or sickness inflicted upon the latter patient or, in some cases, the doctor or nurse attending the patient as a result of the doctor or nurse accidentaly poking himself with a used hypodermic needle, is too well known. The cost, which is small, of the cartons of the present invention is welljustified to prevent such occurrences.

More particularly, the cartons of the present invention are fabricated from a single blank of a suitable fiat sheet material such as heavy paperboard or plastic which is cut, scored, folded and affixed together in a fashion such that it can be shipped and stored collapsed or knocked-down. To assemble one of the cartons for use, a small force is applied, with the two hands, for example, to two of its opposite corners, until the carton is formed. The carton has both a self-forming and selfleveling bottom and top so that it is automatically formed and locked together, in one continuous operation. At least one aperture which is specially constructed so that it is self-closing is formed in at least one of its side walls, for receiving and retaining articles therein. Accordingly, it can be seen that these cartons can be conveniently stored in a readily accessible location, and easily and quickly formed for use. Immediately upon using, for example, a throw-away hypodermic needle, it is extended through the aperture in the carton to dispose of it. The articles are safely retained in the cartons and can only be removed from the cartons by collapsing or destroying the carton, so that the articles cannot be inadvertently or accidently re-used. When the carton is partially or completely filled, it is merely disposed of in an accepted manner for disposing of such articles.

While the carton of the invention is particularly applicable for use in the above-described environment, that is, in hospitals, doctors offices and the like, to dispose of contaminated articles, it also is applicable for numerous other purposes, as will be apparent from the description below.

It is an object of the present invention to provide improved disposable cartons.

An object is to provide improved cartons which are self-forming.

Still another object is to provide improved closed, self-forming cartons which are formed from a single blank of sheet material.

A still further object is to provide improved closed, self-forming cartons which are formed from a single blank of sheet material, in a fashion such that they can be shipped collapsed or knocked-down.

A still further object is to provide improved cartons of the latter type which are automatically erected in a continuous operation, without the need of additional fastening means or the necessity of inserting tuck flaps or the like.

Still another object is to provide improved self-forming cartons which are adapted to receive articles therein in a fashion such that the articles cannot be removed, without collapsing or destroying the carton.

A still further object is to provide improved cartons of the above type which can be manufactured on existing carton forming machinery.

Other objects of the invention will in part be obvious and will in part appear hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises an article of manufacture possessing the features, properties, and the relation of elements which will be exemplified in the article hereinafter described, and the scope of the invention will be indicated in the claims.

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be had tothe following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a carton exemplary of the invention, when erected;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the blank of sheet material from which the carton of FIG. 1 is formed;

FIGS. 3, 4, 5 and 6 are views of the blank of FIG. 2, illustrating the manner in which it is folded to form the carton of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 7 is a partial perspective view of the bottom of the carton, prior to being completely closed.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views of the drawing.

Referring now to the drawing, in FIG. 1 there 1s illustrated a carton 10 having four side walls 11-14 (FIG. 2) and self-forming, self-leveling top and bottom walls 15 and 16, the latter being shown in FIG. 7. In the illustrated embodiment, the side wall 13 is shown having a star-burst, self-closing aperture 18 formed in it, for depositing articles in the carton 10. A similar aperture can be provided in each of the side walls 11-14, or another differently constructed aperture preferably of a self-closing type can be provided in one or more of the side walls, if desired. The carton 10 is formed from the blank 20 of sheet material shown in FIG. 2, in a fashion such that it can be shipped and/or stored collapsed or knocked-down, in the condition illustrated in FIG. 6. The carton 10 thereafter is easily and quickly automatically erected in one continuous operation, simply by applying a force to the two opposite edges or corners 0 21 and 22 thereof, in the direction of the arrows 24 that the carton is completely formed and locked erected, without the need of additional fastening means or the necessity of inserting tuck flaps or the like.

The carton 10 is completely closed except for the aperture 18 through which articles are pushed to deposit them in the carton, and cannot be opened once erected, without collapsing or destroying it. Accordingly, as indicated above, the carton 10 is particularly applicable for use in hospitals, doctors offices and the like, to dispose of articles such as tongue depressors and hypodermic needles which are contaminated after being used.

More particularly, the carton 10 is formed from the blank 20 of suitable flat sheet material which has four vertical, parallel, spaced score lines 26-29 formed on it which divide the blank into the four side walls 11-14 and a small seal flap 30 which is integrally aflixed to the side wall 11, along the score line 26. The blank 20 also has two horizontal, parallel, spaced score lines 32 and 33 which extend across the top and bottom of the side walls 11-14, respectively. Top flaps 34-37 are integrally aflixed to the side walls 11-14, respectively by means of the score line 32, and bottom flaps 38-41 are integrally afiixed to the side walls 11-14, respectively, by means of the score line 33. Each of the top and bottom flaps 34-41 is physically separated from one another so that they can be individually folded, by either a cut line such as the cut lines 55 or substantially triangular-shaped areas 56 which are cut out between them. A generally triangularshaped locking notch 44 is formed in the edge of the top and bottom flaps 34, 35, 38 and 40, and score lines 45-48 are formed on the respective ones of the flaps. These score lines extend from the apex of the locking notches 44 diagonally downwardly to the corners of the flaps, at the junction of the horizontal score lines 32 or 33 and the cut lines 55. The score lines 45-48 form tug tabs 50-53 which function as described below, to form the top and bottom walls 15 and 16 of the carton 10. The aperture 18 is formed in the appropriate one of the side walls which, in the illustrated embodiment, is side wall13.

After the blank 20 is cut and scored in the above-described manner, the top flaps 34-37 are folded over along the horizontal score line 32 and the bottom flaps 38-41 are folded over along the horizontal score line 33, to lie atop the interior surface of the side walls 11-14, as illustrated in FIG. 3. The tug tabs 50-53, during this folding operation, preferably also are simultaneously reversely folded along the respected score lines 45-48 so that they are back-folded and overlie their associated flaps, as illustrated in FIG. 4. An adhesive then is applied to the exposed surface of the tug tabs 50-53, as illustrated by the speckling 58 in FIG. 4.

Next, the blank 20 is folded over along the score line 27, so that the side wall 11 overlies the side wall 12, and the seal flap integrally aflixed to the side wall 11 partially overlies the side wall 13, as illustrated in FIG. 5. With this fold, it may be noted that the tug tabs 50 and 52 are adhesively aflixed to the top flap and the bottom flap 39, respectively. An adhesive, indicated by the speckling 60, then is applied to the exposed surface of the seal flap 30.

Thereafter, the blank 20 is folded over along the score line 29, so that the side wall 14 overlies the side wall 13 and the seal flap 30, as illustrated in FIG. 6. The seal flap 30 is adhesively affixed to the side wall 14, and the tug tabs 51 and 53 are adhesively afiixed to the top flap 37 and the bottom flap 41, respectively.

The carton 10 now is completely formed, and can be shipped and/or stored in the collapsed or knocked-down condition illustrated in FIG. 6. Accordingly, the cartons 10 are compact and can be easily and conveniently packaged within shipping cartons.

As indicated above, the cartons 10 are easily and quickly erected, simply by applying a force to the opposite edges or corners 21 and 22 thereof, in the direction of the arrows 24 and 25, as illustrated in FIG. 6. As the carton 10 takes shape, the tug tabs 50 and 51 pull the top flaps 35 and 37 into position to form a fully closed, level top wall 15 on the carton 10. The tug tabs 52 and 53 likewise pull the bottom flaps 39 and 41 into position to form a fully closed, level bottom wall 16 on the carton. More specifically, the tug tabs 50 and 51 unfold and tend to flatten or level the top flaps 34 and 36 as though a force were being exerted on the score lines 45-48, from the inside to the outside of the carton. The tug tabs 50 and 51 being fixedly secured to the top flaps 35 and 37, in turn, forcibly pull these flaps into position to lockingly engage the locking notches 44 with one another to provide a level top wall 15 on the carton. When the top flaps 34-37 are positioned, the top wall 15 appears as illustrated in FIG. 1. It can be seen that the tug tabs 50 and 51 are on the outside of the top wall 15, in overlapped relationship on the top flaps 35 and 37. The tug tabs 52 and 53 likewise unfold and tend to level the bottom flaps 38 and 40, in the same fashion. The tug tabs 52 and 53 being fixedly secured to the bottom flaps 39 and 41 also forcibly pull these flaps into position to engage the locking notches 44 with one another. The tug tabs 52 and 53, like the tug tabs 50 and 51, are on the outside of the bottom wall 16, in overlapped relationship on the bottom flaps 39 and 41.

Once the carton 10 is erected, articles can be inserted therein for disposal, by pushing them through the aperture 18 in the side wall 13. The aperature 18 is self-closing after an article is pushed through it, so there is little, if any, chance of the article spilling out of the carton thereafter. Also, the top and bottom flaps tightly interlock with one another to maintain the carton 10 erect. In fact, a considerable force must be simultaneously applied inwardly against both the top and bottom flaps to collapse the carton once it is erected. Accordingly, since the carton is completely closed, the only way to remove the articles is to collapse the carton or to otherwise destroy it. Since, in either case, considerable effort is required, it is unlikely that the carton 10 will be inadvertently collapsed, or destroyed, so there is little, if any, likelihood that the articles will be spilled from the carton due to it collapsing, or being destroyed.

The carton 10 and the contained articles can be destroyed by, for example, placing them in an incinerator. The carton being fabricated of paperboard will burn and, if the articles are flammable, they likewise will burn.

It will thus be seen that the objects set forth above, among those made apparent from the preceding description, are efiiciently attained and, since certain changes may be made in the above article without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Now that the invention has been described, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. A fiat-foldable closed carton formed from a single blank of sheet material and having four lateral side walls mutually joined in pairs to form upright edges, said side walls having at the respective ends thereof top closure flaps and bottom closure flaps which are mutually interconnected to fold outward into a top and a bottom respectively for said carton as the walls are separated after being folded flat, a score line on at least two of said top closure flaps and on at least two of said bottom closure flaps defining foldable tug tabs, said tug tabs respectively being folded along said score lines and sandwiched between the top closure flap and the bottom closure flap to which said tug tab is integrally afiixed and another one of said top closure flaps and said bottom closure flaps when said carton is folded flat, said tug tabs being adhesively secured to respective ones of said other top and bottom closure flaps, and as self-closing aperture in at least one of said side walls for depositing articles in said 2,677,495 5/1954 Buttfry 22939 carton. 2,877,943 3/1959 Gastright 22941 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS DAVIS T. MOORHEAD, Primary Examiner 2,020,663 11/1935 Stapleford 206-63.5 X 5 us. c1. X.R. 2,388,190 10/1945 Smart 229-39 2,553,232 5/1951 Beyer 206--63.5 2O6 63'5 2294 2,676,750 4/1954 Gastright 229--39

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2020663 *Dec 24, 1934Nov 12, 1935Stapleford Frank ECarton
US2388190 *Feb 22, 1943Oct 30, 1945Meade HyndmanFoldable cardboard box
US2553232 *Oct 1, 1949May 15, 1951Beyer Charles JWaste receiver
US2676750 *Mar 15, 1951Apr 27, 1954Queen City Mfg CoFlat folded carton
US2677495 *May 11, 1953May 4, 1954Sutherland Paper CoAutomatic setup carton
US2877943 *Jul 16, 1956Mar 17, 1959Frank A GastrightSelf-erecting box with tabs and recesses for engagement by feeding and erecting mechanism
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3655116 *Feb 3, 1970Apr 11, 1972Container CorpFlap lock container
US3658236 *Oct 24, 1969Apr 25, 1972Lars Gustav RingholmCollapsible disposable ashtray
US3750933 *Jul 22, 1971Aug 7, 1973Nicolay TContainer and closure for the same
US3908821 *Nov 9, 1973Sep 30, 1975United Business And ProfessionRecord keeping tray and assembly
US4121755 *Jul 11, 1977Oct 24, 1978Hammer-Lit GmbhDisposable collecting container for small used articles and waste
US4138012 *Jan 19, 1978Feb 6, 1979Champion International CorporationCarton for holding and displaying a stacked array of flat rectangular boxes
US4201331 *Mar 28, 1979May 6, 1980Champion International CorporationButterfly carton and blank for forming same
US4291828 *Apr 14, 1980Sep 29, 1981Royal Continental Box CompanyCombination collapsable self-erecting self-locking carton
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US4535928 *Nov 2, 1983Aug 20, 1985International Paper CompanyDual purpose carton
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Classifications
U.S. Classification229/117, 229/122, 229/907, 206/370, 229/121
International ClassificationB65D5/36, B65D5/16
Cooperative ClassificationY10S229/907, B65D5/16, B65D5/3621
European ClassificationB65D5/36B2A, B65D5/16