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Publication numberUS3494628 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 10, 1970
Filing dateFeb 24, 1967
Priority dateFeb 24, 1967
Also published asDE1678294A1, DE1678294B2, DE1678294C3
Publication numberUS 3494628 A, US 3494628A, US-A-3494628, US3494628 A, US3494628A
InventorsRichard G Spademan
Original AssigneeSpademan Richard George
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toe piece
US 3494628 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 10,1970 RS SPADEMAIQ 3,494,628-

TOE PIECE Filed Feb. 24, 196i y 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. @cd/'a' .gala/endl? ATTORN S Feb. 10, 1970 R. G. sPADEMAN TOE PIECE 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 24, 1967 NJ fr maw/ M m fm .M OM w @wd Feb. 1o, 1970 R, G. sPADE-MAN 3,494,628

TOE PIECE Filed Feb. 24, 1967 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 L M LEO 5 INTEROSSEOUS SPACE TALUS TIBIA MEDlAL MALLEoLus FIBULA- LATERAL ATTORNE 3,494,628 TOE PIECE Richard G. Spademan, 300 Pasteur Drive, Palo Alto, Calif. 94304 Filed Feb. 24, 1967, Ser. No. 618,369 Int. Cl. A63c 9/00 U.S. Cl. 280-1L35 16 Claims ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE A device for securing the toe of a ski boot to a ski and constructed to permit the ski boot to move forward along the length of the ski upon release of the toe binding. The toe binding may either supply a substantial binding force to hold the ski boot to the ski, or it may be merely a stabilizing device applying little if any downward force S0 as to prevent or inhibit lifting of the boot toe from the ski.

This invention relates to a toepiece for holding or stabilizing the toe portion of a ski boot on a ski, and more particularly to a toepiece construction which lwill permit unimpeded forward movement of the ski boot along the ski under binding release conditions.

In the design, manufacture, mounting and adjustment ofski bindings for securing a ski boot on a ski, there are numerous problems and requirements that must be met in order to not only retain the boot on the ski for normal skiing activity, but to also provide for proper release of the boot from the ski under falling conditions, or the like, so as to avoid injury to the skier as a result of the connection between the ski boot and the ski.

Most presently available safety bindings atlix the ski boot upon the ski at both the toe and heel of the ski boot. various combinations of toe and heel devices are possible from the great number of commercially available bindings, and it is imperative that compatible combinations be utilized to provide the proper release characteristics of the binding. The majority of ski release bindings are designed to release the boot from the ski in an impending fall condition by two interdependent movements. The toe of the boot releases 4by medial or lateral rotation about an axis normal to the surface of the ski and through the ski boot heel. The heel of the vboot releases in a generally upward rotation about an axis transverse to the surface of the ski and through the toe of the boot. Of important consideration in the proper release of the boot from the binding are the various adjustments of the heel and toe binding mechanisms, the weight and location of the skiers body relative to the ski and the manner in which the bindings lare intended to release.

`The most commonly used form of binding mechanism for the heel portion of the boot is a cable that extends around the heel of the boot and projects forwardly and under guides on the sides of the ski to a spring loaded release lever located generally forward of the boot. Such cable mechanisms are intended to function by providing a forward and downward thrust upon the heel of the boot, holding the boot upon the ski and forcing the boot into intimate contact with the toepiece. Such cable mechanisms are designed to afford release of the boot when the heel rotates upwardly in a plane normal to the surface of the ski and upon a predetemined upward thrust, or heel lift, by tripping the spring loaded release lever.

A second type of heel holding mechanism is generally referred to as a stepn or latch-in unit, which functions in essentially the same manner as the cable type of heel release mechanism, forcing the boot heel down upon the ski and forwardly into the toepiece by means of a self-contained spring loaded gripping device. These units United States Patent O 3,494,628 Patented Feb. 10, 1970 lCe are intended to release the boot in the same plane as release of the cable mechanisms.

Other forms of heel binding devices are available that depend upon variations of spring activated means upon the boot and may take the form of heel turn-tables, inclined cams and spring loaded lever arms. None of these types of heel bindings compensate for the factors of force present during an impending fall condition. Furthermore, most toe and heel pieces are subject to -a complex relation in design, installation and adjustment that greatly affects reliable release under impending fall conditions.

With respect to the design and function of the toepieces presently available, all toepieces provide an obstruction in the `front of the boot consisting of a relatively `unyielding, upright column or plate. In an impending fall condition, and relative forward momentum of the body, the boot must pivot about this obstruction in a plane normal to the surface "of the ski in order to become released from the ski. As will become hereinafter more apparent, and upon consideration of the anatomical relationships within the ankle joint, this pivotal movement of the boot during the deceleration of an impending fall condition allows the ankle to rapidly assume a position of acute dorsiilection and the range of motion `within the ankle joint is decreased, converting the foot into a rigid lever, This is a critical factor in the mechanism of ankle injuries.

Furthermore, impulse of the boot into the toepiece is usually necessary to allow the release mechanism to function, by changing configuration or position. In the moments prior to release of the boot from the ski by pivoting about the toepiece obstruction, frictional buildup due to such impulse extends the lever arm to the tip of the ski. Thus, the obstruction both converts the foot into a rigid lever and also extends this lever to the tip of the ski, providing a mechanical advantage which minimizes the force necessary to overcome the injury threshold within the ankle.

Proper installation of the toepiece by the average skier is seldom obtained due to a lack of knowledge of the mechanisms involved and the number of complex adjustments that are usually necessary. Adjustment of spring tensions at the heel and toe release mechanisms is critical, and adjustment of the spring tension under static conditions is diflicult since the factors of force present in an impending fall condition cannot be reliably predicted. Compounding the relative ineifectiveness of the toepiece to prevent the formation of an extended rigid lever arm during an impending fall condition, are the difficulties in the heel release mechanism. As noted, most heel release mechanisms are variations of the arrangement in which a cable extends around a groove in the boot heel and functions by a diagonal or downward and forward thrust of the heel of the boot into the toepiece. The ratio of downward to forward thrust upon the boot heel depends primarily upon the placement of the cable guides in rela# tion to the heel groove. It is generally accepted that these guides be located approximately 1/3 of the distance forward from the heel toward the boot toe. However, the functional placement is intimately involved with the depth of the heel groove, the thicknesses of the boot heel and ski and the length of the boot. Also involved is the weight and prociency of the skier and the amount of lift desired prior to release of the -boot heel from the ski. The primary forward thrust of the boot into the toepiece by the usual heel binding mechanism is increased by the lift or upward thrust upon the boot in an impending fall condition and by the increasing tension upon the spring forming a rigidly extended lever arm. Momentary entrapment of the cable in a heel groove also occurs, due to this increase in excessive spring tension. Therefore, the integrity of the angle joint is threatened and in many instances the threshold of injury is exceeded prior to release of the boot from the binding.

In another form of safety binding, utilizing a single means adjacent the heel of the boot, as illustrated in U.S. Patent 3,140,877 issued on July 14,1964, or where a single binding is located at the side of the bootK as illustrated in U.S. Patent 3,271,040, issued on Sept. 6, 1966, it may become necessary, due to improper placement or improper adjustment of the single fitting binding, to provide some means adjacent the toe of the boot to stabilize the toe of the boot for medial or lateral movement during normal skiing activities, and at the same time, to prevent slight separation of the boot toe from the ski where snow or ice might collect and decrease the effectiveness of the binding. A toepiece provided to minimize these problems should apply relatively little, if any, clamping force to the toe of the boot, the primary retention of the boot on the ski being by means of the single fitting rearwardly located binding, said binding being adapted to releasably resist longitudinal, lateral, twisting and heel-lifting movement of the ski boot relative to the ski without requiring the use of a toe fastening device.

The device in which this invention is embodied com prises, generally, a toepiece construction which is so located relative to the toe of the ski boot as to disengage under proper release forces and in such a way that the ski boot is allowed to move in unimpeded fashion forwardly along the upper surface of the ski, and thereby will not be required to pivot about an obstruction in front of the boot. Such toepiece may be used with the normally available heel release mechanisms, wherein the toepiece will provide a substantial force at the toe of the boot to maintain the toe in proper contact with the ski, or such toepiece may be utilized with a single tting binding, such as illustrated in the aforementioned patents, and in such situation it is intended that the toepiece provide relatively little clamping force on the toe of the boot, the major holding force being at the single fitting binding.

In so providing a toepiece for a ski -boot and ski combination, the forward obstruction is avoided and upon impending fall conditions and upon release of the heel portion of the ski boot from the ski, the boot is allowed to travel forwardly over the surface of the ski without the upward pivotal movement of the boot heel. Such unimpeded forward movement tends to prevent further dorsiection of the ankle joint and is a great factor in reducing bone breaks and ankle injuries as a result of such motion. The toepiece is thus a safer means for assisting in holding the ski boot to the ski, or in its action as a stabilizing member, and isinexpensive to manufacture, produce and mount on a ski. At the same time, standard release clamp mechanisms may be used which are easily adjusted so that the proper force of the mechanism on the ski boot can be maintained.

These and other advantages will become more apparent from the following description and drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is an elevational view of a ski boot, ski binding and ski assembly illustrating the location of the various parts and the location of the toepiece assembly;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged elevational view of a preferred embodiment of the toepiece assembly;

FIGURE 3 is a Iplan View of the toepiece assembly Villustrated in FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 9 is a front elevational view of the toepiece assembly illustrated in FIGURE 8;

FIGURE 10 is a side elevational view of the toepiece assembly illustrated in FIGURE 7, showing the toepiece in releasing position;

FIGURE 11 is a plan view of the toepiece illustrated in FIGURE 7, showing the assembly in releasing condition;

FIGURE 12 is a side elevational view of yet another preferred embodiment of the toepiece assembly;

FIGURE 13 is a front elevational view of the toepiece assembly illustrated in FIGURE 12;

FIGURE 14 is a side elevational viewof yet another preferred embodiment of the toepiece assembly;

FIGURE 15 is a plan View of the toepiece assembly illustrated in FIGURE 12;

FIGURE 16 is a front elevational View of the toepiece illustrated in FIGURE 14;

FIGURE 17 is a side elevational view of the toepiece illustrated in FIGURE 14, showing the assembly in releasing position;

FIGURE 18 is a plan view of the toepiece assembly illustrated in FIGURE 14, showing the assembly in releasing position;

FIGURE 19 is an elevational schematic view of a portion of the normal ankle joint;

FIGURE 20 is a front elevational view of a portion of the normal ankle joint;

FIGURE 21 is a cross-sectional view of the ankle joint illustrated in FIGURES 19 and 21, taken substantially along the line 21-21 of FIGURE 20 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, FIGURE 1 best illustrates the usual ski and binding assembly in which a ski boot, indicated generally by the numeral 10, is mounted or affixed on a ski, indicated generally by the numeral 12, by means of a ski binding assembly, illustrated generally by the numeral 14, and wherein the toe portion of the ski boot 10 is stabilized or held in position by a toepiece assembly, indicated generally by the numeral 16. A safety release mechanism 18, operatively connected to the binding structure 14, and/or the toepiece 16, as will become hereinafter more apparent, permits release of the bindings 14 and 16, and disengagement of the boot 10, from the ski 12 when the proper forces exist in the binding structures 14 and 16 such as may be caused by an impending fall condition.

Referring more particularly to FIGURES 19 through 2l, showing the location and parts in the normal ankle joints, a brief description of the ankle joint and its manner of movement may provide a more meaningful insight into the structure and reasons for the invention herein described and shown. As best illustrated in FIGURES 19 and 20, the ankle joint is at the terminus of the tibia and fibula extending downwardly from the knee to the ankle joint. At the lower end of the tibia and fibula is an ankle mortise, provided by the downwardly projecting lips of the medial, lateral and posterior malleoli and their supporting ligaments, not shown. The lateral malleolus projects much deeper than the medial malleolus and medial stability is provided by the strong medial Deltoid ligament extending between the medial malleolus and the calcaneous. The strength of the Deltoid ligament is such that a break at the tip of the medial malleolus is more apt to occur than rupture of the ligament. The lateral ligament, which extends between the lateral malleolus and calcaneous, has three distinct bands, the rearward of which is exceedingly strong and is seldom ruptured. The tibia and fi'bula are held in their proper relationship by ligaments and membrane in the interosseous space therebetween.

The talus lits in the ankle mortise as a tenon, and has a monaxial curvature with a forward to rearward convexity, as illustrated in FIGURE 21. The talus is about one quarter wider at its forward portion than at its rearward portion, and in the natural position of the foot relative to the leg, a slight range of motion is possible because the narrower rearward portion of the talus is engaged in the ankle mortise between the medial and lateral malleoli. In the dorsiilexed foot, that is, where the foot assumes a position at an angle relative to the leg as by lifting the boot or pivoting the boot about the heel, lateral rotation of the talus in the joint is restricted because the broad forward portion of the talus becomes engaged in the mortise between the medial and lateral malleoli. Rotational movement of the foot about the longitudinal axis thereof, as in a clockwise direction in FIGURE and along axis normal'to the paper, is prevented by the sharp lateral margin of the talus-and the tautness of the Deltoid ligament. Medial rotation of the dorsillexed foot, that is, rotation of the foot around an axis through the heel and parallel to the leg bones, is combined with a rotational movement around the axis through the length of the foot, in a counter-clockwise direction as viewed in FIGURE 2'0, because the curved medial margin of the talus, coupled with the numerous joints in the foot, render the foot more -mobile in this direction. In addition, the forward band of the fbular ligament becomes lax in dorsiection of the foot. Forward movement of the mortise relative to the talus is resisted by the divergent medial and lateral melleoli and the wider forward portion of the talus, in addition to the deeper posterior lmalleolus of the tibia. A certain elasticity is provided in the mortise by the expansion of the interosseous space between the libula and the tibia.

The normal movement of the ankle joint is generally in the plane of the long axis ofthe leg. Movement of the foot' toward and away from the median line, that is by moving the foot inwardly or outwardly in the plane of the floor, -or the clockwise or the counter-clockwise rotations previously mentioned, take place in the subtalar joints, and forces in these directi-ons are readily transmitted to the ankle joint by the strong and relatively inelastic subtalar ligaments. Movements of inward rotation away from the median line are almost inseparable from a movement in a counter-clockwise direction as in FIG- URE 20, and movement away from the median line in an outward direction converts the foot into a rigid lever.

Considering the brief knowledge obtained by the foregoing description, and considering the structure of the ankle joint in terms of a skier engaged in downhill skiing, it will be readily apparent that the skier, with his rigid boot sole aixed to the ski, is leaning forward, or crouching, so that the lower leg bones, the tibia and libula, form a forward angle with the ski. Under such conditions, the ankle is in dorsillection, that is, the talus is moved rearwardly to close the space between the medial and lateral malleoli, and the skiers foot and leg assume a rigid position. Any further dorsiection, that is, any further acuteness of the angle between the lower leg bones and the ski, can lead to serious injury or break in the various parts of the ankle joint. Furthermore, this rigidity transmits forces more easily to the tibia, bula and knee joint where an accident can cause serious injury to these parts.

With the foot in an acute dorsiilexed position, such as above described, and considering the instantaneous movements of the various parts of the boot, binding and ski when an accident occurs, it will now be -apparent that the momentum of the skier, the release adjustment of the bindings and the position of the various bones in the foot, ankle and leg become critical. Assuming a situation where the ski is abruptly stopped, as by hitting `an object, the momentum of the skier will tend to carry him forward. Assuming the bindings are properly adjusted for release, that is, the forces necessary to overcome the safety mechanism in the clamping means are overcome, it is advantageous if the boot can move forwardly over the upper surface of the ski without any impediments or obstructions so that no further, or little further, dorsillection takes place to damage the ankle joint. With an obstruction at the toepiece, it is apparent that, instantaneously, the boot will jam against such obstruction and the skiers body momentum will tend to cause the leg bones to move toward the ski, thus increasing the dorsillection. At this point, the heel may begin to lift off the ski and pivot over such obstruction, but by this time, the injury may have already occurred. By removing any obstruction in the toepiece, or forwardly of the boot, and permitting the boot to move along the upper surface of the ski for that instant prior to lifting of the boot heel, further acute dorsiflection is relieved, and the integrity of the ankle joint is maintained.

With these principles in mind, reference is now to be had to FIGURE 2 through 6 of the drawings, illustrating a toepiece assembly which permits proper movement of the boot upon release of the binding mechanism. Mounted on the ski 12, is a plate member 20, upon which the boot 10 may rest and which serves to protect the operating mechanism, which will be hereinafter more particularly described. Adjacent the forward end of the plate 20 are rolled eyes 22, which serve to receive and retain a hinge pin 24. Pin 24 receives a similarly rolled eye 26 formed on an upwardly extending member 30 which engages Vthe toe portion of the boot 10. Upwardly extending member 30 includes an inwardly directed flange 32, which is upwardly and inwardly disposed relative to the plate 20 in its engaging position, and a lateral ange 34 which is upwardly and inwardly disposed relative to the plate 20 in the boot engaging position. Flanges 32 and 34 provide a downward and rearward force to the boot 10 of a desired magnitude, depending on whether the toepiece assembly is to be used as a clamping means acting in conjunction with a heel binding to secure the boot 10 to the ski, or alternatively, to provide a light stabilizing force where the rear binding is providing the major clamping force to hold the boot 10 on the ski, in the manner of the aforementioned patents. In either event, the amount of force necessary is controlled by cable members 36 secured as at 38 to the upwardly extending members 30 and extending rearwardly to a safety release mechanism 18. Arcuate anges 40 may be disposed beneath the plate member 20 to properly direct the cables from the upwardly extending members 30 to the safety release mechanism 18. p

As will be apparent from viewing FIGURES 5 and 6, the upwardly extending members 30 are allowed to pivot about the pivot pins 24 away from the ski boot 10, to allow the ski boot to travel forwardly along the length of the ski in unimpeded fashion. At the same time, rotational release is possible, as illustarted in FIGURE 6, by one or the other of the upwardly extending members 30 being released by the safety mechanism 18 and permitting the boot to disengage. Disengagement is facilitated by the angular direction of the lateral and longitudinal flanges in that such flanges act as cams to direct the upwardly extending members, 30, out of the way of the boot toe upon release.

Referring next to FIGURES 7 through 1l, la modification of the toepieceassembly is shown in which the plate member 20 is secured to the ski 12 in similar fashion and includes similar eyes 22, rolled to receive a pivot pin 24. Also mounted for rotation on pivot pin 24 is an upwardly directed member, indicated generally as numeral 42, which is inwardly arcuate in shape, as best illustrated in FIGURES 8 and 1l. Secured to the side portion of the boot 10, by screws or the like, are plate members 44 having arcuate depressions 46 formed therein to receive the arcuate upwardly directed members 42. The upwardly directed members 42 may be arcuate in the vertical plane, as illustrated in FIGURE 9, to extend around the outwardly protruding plate members 44 and to apply a downward and inward force of the desired degree. Upwardly directed members 42 are controlled by cables 36 extending beneath the plate member 20 and secured to the members 42, as at 46. As in the released described above with respect to the modification of FIGURES 2 through 6, it will be apparent that upon overcoming the clamping forces on the upwardly directed members 42, the protruding plate members 44 will disengage from the members 42 by camming outwardly due to the arcuate nature of the members and the opening 46 so that the boot may move forwardly over the surface of the ski in unimpeded manner. Rotational release of the boot from the toepiece assembly is also possible, by overcoming the force in the safety release mechanism.

With reference to FIGURES 12 and 13, yanother modification of a toepiece is shown for holding or stabilizing the toe of boot on the ski 12. The sole plate 21 includes rolled eyes 23 receiving a pivot pin 25. Received for pivotal movement on pivot pin 24 is upwardly directed member 27 having a rearwardly turned lip or ange 29. Flange 29 is sufficiently high above the plate 21 to overlap the toe of the boot sole to inhibit upward movement of the toe away from ski 12. Upon release of the-heel binding, and forward movement of boot 10 relative to the ski 12, arm 27 pivots forwardly toward the ski. Flange 29 is of short enough length to engage the toe of the boot sole in the engaged position, but not impede forward movement of the boot over the surface of the ski upon release of the boot.

Should some force be necessary to maintain arm 27 in the upright position, a torsion spring or the like, not shown, may be used in the well-known manner to so bias arm 27. Such spring must be of sufficient rate to be easily overcome by forward movement of the boot under release conditions, so as not to impede movement of the boot over the ski.

Referring next to FIGURES 14 through 18, yet another modification of the toepiece assembly is illustrated. The ski 12 has secured thereon, in any suitable manner, a plate member 48 having rolled eyes 50 at the forward end thereof and forward of the boot 10. Eyes 50 receive a pivot pin 52 which in turn is received in an eye 54 formed in a single upwardly directed member 56. Member 56 is controlled by a cable 58 extending rearwardly to the release mechanism, and in its engaged position is inclined upwardly and rearwardly into engagement with the boot 10. A friction bumper 59, or the like, may be mounted in the arm 56 for additional holding power on the boot 10, if necessary. Upon overcoming the adjusted forces in the release mechanism, the arm 56 may pivot downwardly and forwardly to disengage from the boot and to allow the boot unimpeded 'movement along the surface of the ski and forwardly thereof.

Thus, a ski binding toepiece assembly is provided which eliminates any kind of obstruction forwardly of the ski boot to permit the ski boot unimpeded forward movement upon release of the binding assemblies. This inhibits any further dorsiflection of the angle joint, which could cause severe injury thereto, and thus eliminates a great number of possible injuries due to skiing accidents. The device is relatively simple to manufacture and produce, and is easily mounted on existing skiis in conjunction with numerous other types of ski bindings that either solely or in cooperation therewith retain the boot on the ski.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. In combination, a ski, a ski boot, safety binding means engaging said boot rearwardly of the toe portion thereof for releasably resisting longitudinaL'lateral, twisting and heel-lifting movement of said ski boot relative to said ski without requiring the use of a toe fastening device, and boot toe stabilizing means for maintaining the position of said boot toe on said ski, said stabilizing means being releasable to permit unimpeded forward movement of said boot along said ski without upward pivotal movement of the heel of said boot.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein said stabilization means resiliently engages the toe portion of said boot. 3. In combination, a ski, a ski boot, and means for releasably securing said ski boot on said ski and including toe securing means disposed adjacent the position of the toe portion of said ski boot and engageable therewith and releasable to permit unimpeded forward-movement of said boot along said ski without upward pivotal movement of the heel of said boot when the force on said boot is parallel to said ski, said releasably securing means being devoid of any structure which would impede said forward movement.

4. The combination of claim 2 wherein said toe securing means resiliently engages the toe portion of said boot.

5. Toe bindingmechanism adapted to be used in combination with a ski boot and a ski and comprising:

means adaptedjo be mounted on said ski adjacent the forward portion of said boot when said boot is on said ski, said means having a rst position engageable with said toe of said boot and a second position disengaged from said toe of said boot and disposed to permit unimpeded forward movement of said boot along said ski, without upward pivotal movement of the heel when the force on said boot is parallel to said ski of said boot; and n means operatively connected to said last-named means for retaining said last-named means in said first position and permitting movement of said last-named to said second position upon pre-determined force conditions thereon, and both of said last two named means being/devoid of any structure which would impede said forward movement.

6. A stabilizing device for the toe of a ski boot secured to a ski by safety binding means engaging said boot rearwardly of the toe portion thereof for releasably resisting longitudinal, lateral, twisting and heel-lifting movement of said ski boot relative to said ski without requiring the use of a toe fastening device, said device comprising:

boot toe engaging means mounted on said ski adjacent the toe of said ski boot and having a first position engaging said boottoe for maintaining the position of said boot toe relative to said ski, said means having a second position disengaged from said boot toe for permitting unimpeded forward movement of said ski boot along said ski without upward pivotal movement of the heel of said boot; and

means operatively connected to said toe engaging means for retaining said toe engaging means in said first position and permitting movement of said toe engaging means to said second position under predetermined force conditions thereon.

7. The stabilizing device set forth in claim 6 wherein said toe engaging means are pivotable from said first position to said second position about an axis parallel to said ski and located outwardly of the sole of said boot.

8. The stabilizing device set forth in claim 6 wherein said toe engaging means are pivotable from said first position to said second position about an axis laterally of said ski and located below the sole of said boot.

9. The stabilizing device set forth in claim 6 wherein said toe engaging means includes a member pivotally mounted on said ski, about an axis which is located outside the path of forward movement of said ski boot, and extending upwardly therefrom to engage said boot in said first position.

10. The stabilizing device set forth in claim 9 wherein said upwardly extending member is disposed forwardly of said boot, and the pivot axis thereof is lateral of said ski and located below the sole of said boot.

11. The stabilizing device set forth in claim 6 wherein said toe engaging means includes spaced upwardly extending members disposed adjacent the forward corners of said toe portion of said ski boot and being pivotally mounted on said ski for rotation from said first position to said second position about an axis parallel to said ski and located outwardly of the sole of said boot.

12. A stabilizing device for the toe of a ski boot secured to a ski by binding means and comprising:

a pair of laterally spaced members mounted on said ski adjacent said toe of said ski boot, said members having lateral flanges disposed upwardly and rearwardly relative to said ski and longitudinal flanges disposed upwardly and inwardly relative to said ski;

pivot means mounting said space members on said ski and permitting each of said members to move between a first position in engagement with said toe portion of said boot and a second position disengaged from said toe portion of said boot and disposed to permit unimpeded forward movement of said ski boot along said ski; and

safety release mechanism mounted on said ski and operatively connected to said spaced members, said mechanism maintaining said members in said first position during normal skiing activity and being releasable to permit movement of either or both of said members to said second position upon predetermined force conditions on said spaced members.

13. A stabilizing device for the toe of a ski boot secured to a ski by binding means and comprising:

plate members secured to opposite sides of said ski boot and adjacent the toe portion thereof;

an upwardly directed member extending from said ski adjacent each of said plate members and being arcuately inwardly formed;

pivot means securing said upwardly directed members to said ski and permitting said members to move between a rst position in engagement with said plate members and a second position disengaged from said plate members and disposed to permit unimpeded forward movement of said boot along said ski; and

safety release mechanism mounted on said ski and operatively connected to said upwardly directed members, said mechanism maintaining said upwardly directed members in said first position during normal skiing activity and being releasable to permit movement of either or both of said upwardly directed members to said second position upon predetermined force conditions on said upwardly directed members.

14. A stabilizing device for the toe of a ski boot secured to a ski by safety binding means for releasably resisting longitudinal, lateral, twisting and heel-lifting movement of said ski boot relative to said ski without requiring the use of a toe fastening device, and comprising:

a member extending upwardly and rearwardly from said ski and being disposed adjacent the toe of said ski boot and forwardly thereof;

pivot means securing said member to said ski and permitting said member to move between a first position in engagement with the toe portion of said boot and a second position disengaged from the toe portion of said boot and substantially parallel to the surface of said ski to permit unimpeded forward movement of said boot along said ski; and

safety release mechanism mounted on said ski and operatively connected to said member and maintaining said member in said first position during normal skiing activity and being releasable to permit movement of said member to said second position upon predetermined force conditions on said member.

15. The stabilizing device set forth in claim 14 and further including a resilient friction member mounted in said member for frictionally engaging the toe portion of said boot.

16. A stabilizing device for the toe of a ski boot secured to a ski by safety binding means for releasably resisting longitudinal, lateral, twisting and heel-lifting movement of said ski boot relative to said ski without requiring the use of a toe fastening device, and comprising:

a member extending upwardly from said ski and being disposed adjacent the toe of said ski boot and forwardly thereof, said member having a rearwardly directed ange adapted to overlie the toe of the sole of said boot; and

pivot means securing said member to said ski and permitting said member to move between a lirst position in engagement with the toe portion of said `boot and a second position disengaged from the toe portion of said boot and substantially parallel to the surface of said ski to permit unimpeded forward movement of said boot along said ski.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,140,877 7/1964 Spademan. 3,271,040 9/1966 Spademan. 3,318,610 5/1967 Kulick. 3,353,835 11/1967 Sommer.

FOREIGN PATENTS 208,276 3/ 1960 Austria.

OTHER REFERENCES Gretsch & Co. German application Ser. No. 1,015,728 printed Sept. 12, 1957.

LEO FRIAGLIA, Primary Examiner MILTON L. SMITH, Assistant Examiner

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3140877 *Mar 26, 1962Jul 14, 1964Richard G SpademanSafety binding
US3271040 *Apr 29, 1965Sep 6, 1966Richard G SpademanSafety binding
US3318610 *Jun 10, 1964May 9, 1967George KulickSki boot magnetic release binders
US3353835 *Aug 7, 1964Nov 21, 1967Beteiligungs & Patentverw GmbhMagnetic safety ski binding
AT208276B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3578349 *May 26, 1969May 11, 1971James Mitchell EdmundSafety ski binding
US3887205 *Sep 18, 1973Jun 3, 1975James Mitchell EdmundSafety ski binding
US3897077 *Jan 25, 1974Jul 29, 1975Gertsch AgSafety ski binding having cable held sole plate
US4768792 *Aug 19, 1987Sep 6, 1988Spademan Richard GeorgeSki binding toe piece
US5722680 *May 29, 1996Mar 3, 1998The Burton CorporationStep-in snowboard binding
US5957480 *Nov 18, 1997Sep 28, 1999The Burton CorporationStep-in snowboard binding
US6102429 *Nov 18, 1999Aug 15, 2000The Burton CorporationStep-in snowboard binding
US6123354 *Jan 8, 1997Sep 26, 2000Laughlin; JamesStep-in snowboard binding
US6126179 *Jan 8, 1996Oct 3, 2000The Burton CorporationMethod and apparatus for interfacing a snowboard boot to a binding
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Classifications
U.S. Classification280/624
International ClassificationA63C9/08, A63C9/085
Cooperative ClassificationA63C9/08542, A63C9/08528, A63C9/08, A63C9/08557, A63C9/08564, A63C9/086
European ClassificationA63C9/086, A63C9/085A3, A63C9/085B1, A63C9/085C1, A63C9/085C, A63C9/08
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 6, 1987AS17Release by secured party
Owner name: SPADEMAN, RICHARD G, ( SPADMAN")
Effective date: 19860304
Owner name: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Mar 6, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: SPADEMAN, RICHARD G, ( SPADMAN")
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:004689/0057
Effective date: 19860304
Owner name: SPADEMAN, RICHARD G.,CALIFORNIA
Oct 2, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SPADEMAN, RICHARD G.;REEL/FRAME:003914/0801
Effective date: 19810904
Owner name: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., STATELESS
Oct 2, 1981AS06Security interest
Owner name: SPADEMAN, RICHARD G.
Effective date: 19810904
Owner name: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.