Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3496054 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 17, 1970
Filing dateJan 13, 1967
Priority dateJan 13, 1967
Publication numberUS 3496054 A, US 3496054A, US-A-3496054, US3496054 A, US3496054A
InventorsJoseph F Baigas Jr
Original AssigneeKem Wove Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flocked nonwoven textile material having a relief pattern therein
US 3496054 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

FLOGKED NONWOVEN TEXTILE MATERIAL HAVING A Feb. 17, 1970 J. F. BAlGAs, JR y I' 3,496,054.'

RELIEF PATTERN THEREIN Filed Jan. 15, 196:7v 2 Smets-sheet 1 A 16 f 5 lsE'PH E BNQASJR.

#ja/ad,

- ATTORNEY Feb. `17, 1970 J.-'F. BAIGAs', JR 3,496,054

FLOCKED NONWOVEN TEXTILE MATERIAL HAVING A RELIEF PATTERN THEREIN Filed Jan. 13, 1967 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEYS United States Patent O 3,496,054 FLOCKED NONWOVEN TEXTILE MATERIAL HAVING A RELlEF PATTERN THEREIN Joseph F. laigas, Jr., Charlotte, N.C., assigner to Kem- Wove Industries, Inc., a corporation of North Carolina Filed Jan. 13, 1967, Ser. No. 609,017 Int. Cl. D04h 11/00; B32b 5/28, 5/14 U.S. Cl. 161-63 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A flocked, nonwoven textile material, suitable for use as floor coverings, wall coverings, automobile headliners or the like and particularly characterized `by a relief pattern in the flocked surface. The material comprises a high loft, open, low density, bonded, nonwoven batt of thermoplastic textile fibers having interconnecting voids constituting approximately at least 75% of the volume of the bonded batt and irregular, open, voided upper, lower and side surfaces, a resinous adhesive film applied on the surface of the batt and penetrating the batt inwardly to about 10%-35% of the thickness for coating the fibers of the batt in that zone, and a plurality of flock-type textile fibers having one end of each fiber adhered to the adhesive film and to the fibers of the batt in the zone of adhesive coating whereby the flock-type fibers penetrate the bonded batt and extend therefrom to form a relatively dense, abrasion and wear resistant, flocked surface thereon which conforms generally to the irregular surface of the bonded batt to provide a relief pattern which particularly adapts the flocked material for use as a floor covering.

This invention relates to a flocked, nonwoven, composite textile material suitable for use as floor coverings, wall coverings, automobile headliners or the like and more specifically to such a flocked nonwoven material characterized by a relief pattern on the flocked surface thereof.

Flocked textiles are well known and have been widely used as floor coverings or the like. Mechanical flocking has been in use for over fifty years and electrostatic flocking more than thirty years. The art of flocking has been acknowledged to offer many advantages over other textile manufacturing operations, such as weaving or knitting. The speed and economics of flocking is considerably greater than any of the other procedures.

In the carpeting field, normally a non-uniform surface or relief pattern is desired. However, in recent years in the carpeting field, a nonwoven base for flocking normally has been and is utilized. The base upon which the flock is deposited is usually a high density, nonwoven material and is either a needled product wherein the fibers are interlocked mechanically or a heavily saturated bonded nonwoven structure where the surface of the nonwoven is relatively uniform and the surface interstices or voids for the most part are either closed or closely spaced. Conventionally, when an adhesive or bonding agent for adhering the flock fibers to the nonwoven material is applied to the surface of these nonwoven materials, it is normally of high viscosity (30,000 to 100,000 cps. Brookfield at #5 spindle at rpm.) and remains for the major part on the surface of the material and fills the interstices and ice voids and the flock fibers are merely adhered to the surface of the nonwoven material without any penetration internally into the nonwoven material. This type of manufacturing operation results in a uniform flock disposition on the surface and fails to provide a relief pattern which is normally undesirable in the carpeting field .and also results in a fairly weak or easily delarninated abrasion and wear resisting surface on the carpeting material.

Also, it has been proposed to utilize polyurethane foam or bonded fiberglass batts las the base material for forming a flocked product for use as carpeting or other products. However, flocked materials utilizing these types of bases are not entirely satisfactory. The polyurethane foam does not provide individual, substantially round surfaces or fibers in the batt for ease in adherence of the bonding material and the flocked fibers and thereby does not provide a strong bond therebetween. Also, the bonded fiberglass batts are brittle and fracture very easily upon repeated `bending or compressing of the flocked material and thereby are not `at all suitable for use as floor covermgs.

By this invention, it has been discovered that a flocked, nonwoven textile material having superior characteristics and characterized by a relief pattern in the flocked surface which render the same particularly suitable for use as floor coverings or the like may be produced by utilizing a batt of thermoplastic, bendable, nonbrittle, textile fibers disposed in an intermingled, three-dimensional arrangement throughout the length, width and depth of the batt and bonded together at spaced points of contact by a resinous bonding material to fixedly joint the fibers together to form a high loft, open, low density, bonded, nonwoven batt having a plurality of open, interconnecting voids throughout and irregular, open, voided upper, lower and side surfaces thereon. This bonded nonwoven batt includes a resinous adhesive film deposited on and coating the fibers of the batt in a zone extending from the upper surface of the batt inwardly to about 10%- 35% of the thickness of the batt and a multiplicity of flock-type textile fibers having one end of each fiber adhered to the adhesive film and to the fibers of the batt in the zone of the adhesive film coating whereby the flock-type fibers penetrate the bonded batt and extend therefrom to form a relatively dense, abrasion and wear resistant, flocked surface thereon which conforms generally to the irregular surface of the bonded batt to provide a relief pattern which particularly adapts the flocked material for use as floor coverings.

Also, it has been found by this invention that the relationship of the average length of the flock-type textile fibers to the average cross-sectional dimensions of the voids in the bonded batt will produce distinctly different structures, both of which provide Vrelief patterns in the flocked surfaces and are well suited for use as floor coverings. When the average length of the flock-type textile fibers is greater than the average cross-sectional dimension of the voids in the bonded batt, the flock-type fibers will extend from and generally perpendicular to the upper surface of the bonded batt to provide a high pile surface on the material. When the average length of the flock-type textile fibers is less than the average cross-sectional dimension of the voids, the flock-type fibers will extend substantially radially from and substantially surround each of the fibers of the bonded batt to which they are adhered to provide a dense flocked surface on the material and to render the material more resistant to compression and abrasion.

Both of the above-described specific types of flocked, nonwoven textile material will provide flocked surfaces which are strongly adhered to the bonded nonwoven batt both at the surface thereof and internally thereof by extending into the voids of the nonwoven batt thereby providing a flocked surface which is not easily delaminated from the base material and becomes an integral part of the str-ucture. Also, due to the irregular and open voided configuration of the surface of the nonwoven batt as opposed to the more conventional base materials, a flocked surface is produced which is characterized by a relief pattern on the flocked, nonwoven material which is particularly suitable for use as floor coverings and which is not readily obtained by the use of other types of base materials, such as those discussed above.

Further features of this invention will be understood from a consideration of the following more detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE l is an enlarged perspective view of a portion of a flocked, nonwoven textile material of this invention utilizing flock-type textile fibers which have an average length longer than the average cross-sectional dimension of the voids in the bonded batt and which illustrates a relief pattern in the flocked surface of the material;

FIGURE 2 is a more enlarged cross-sectional View of the flocked, nonwoven textile material of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged perspective view of a portion of a flocked, nonwoven textile material of this invention utilizing flock-type textile fibers which have an average length shorter than the average cross-sectional dimension of the voids in the bonded batt and which illustrates a relief pattern in the flocked surface of the material;

FIGURE 4 is a greatly-enlarged cross-sectional view, broken away, of the flocked, nonwoven textile material of FIGURE 3; and

FIGURE 5 is a cross-sectional view of one of the fibers 3f the flocked material of FIGURE 4 illustrating the Flock-type textile fibers extending radially from and surrounding the fiber and taken substantially along the line S-S of FIGURE 4.

Referring now to the drawings and particularly to FIG- URES 1 and 2, there is shown a flocked, nonwoven textile material, generally indicated by the reference numeral 10, which is particularly suitable for use as floor coverings or `:he like and which is characterized by a relief pattern in :he flocked surface. The material comprises a batt, gen- :rally indicated yby the reference numeral 11, of thermo- Alastic, bendable, non-brittle, textile bers 12 disposed in an intermingled, three-dimensional arrangement through- Jut the length, width and depth of the batt 11 and bonded :ogether at spaced points of contact by a resinous bonding noterial 13 to fixedly join the fibers 12 together to form a righ loft, open, low density, bonded, nonwoven batt 11 raving a plurality of open, interconnecting voids 14 con- ;tituting approximately at least 75% of the volume of the /olume of the bonded batt and irregular, open, voided lpper, lower and side surfaces 15, 16 and 17 thereon.

The flocked, nonwoven textile material 10 further corn- Jrises a resinous adhesive film, generally indicated `by the 'eference numeral 2i), disposed ,on and coating the fibers 12 )f the batt 11 in a zone extending from the upper surface l5 inwardly to about 10%-35% of the thickness of the )att 11. The flocked material 10 also includes a multiplicity if flock-type textile fibers 21 having one end of each fiber rdhered to the plastic film 20 and to the fibers 12 of the )att 11 in the zone of adhesive film coating whereby the lock-type fibers 21 penetrate into the voids 14 of the bouded batt 11 and extend therefrom to form a relatively dense, abrasion and wear resistant, flocked surface 22 which conforms generally to the irregular voided surface of the bonded batt 11 to provide a relief pattern which particularly adapts the flocked material 10 for use as floor coverings.

In the flocked, nonwoven textile material 10 of FIG- URES 1 and 2, the flock-type textile fibers 21 preferably have an average length longer than the average cross-sectional dimension of the voids 14 of the bonded nonwoven batt 11 so that the flock-type fibers will extend from and generally perpendicular to the upper surface of the bonded batt 11 to provide a high pile surface on the material. The average lengths of these flock-type fibers 21 are 3 mm. to 5 mm. and the average cross-sectional dimensions of the voids 14 are 2 mm. to 4 mm.

Referring now to FIGURES 3-5, there is shown a similar flocked material construction wherein like reference numerals are utilized with prirne notations thereon. In these figures, there is shown a flocked, nonwoven textile material 10 which is particularly suitable for use as floor coverings or the like and which is characterized by a relief pattern in the flocked surface. The material 10 comprises a fbatt 11 of thermoplastic, bendable, nonbrittle, textile fibers 12' disposed in an intermingle, three-dimensional arrangement through the length, width and depth of the batt 11 and bonded together at spaced points of contact by a resinous bonding material 13 to fixedly join the fibers 12 together to form a high loft, open, low density, bonded, nonwoven batt 11 having a plurality of open, interconnecting voids 14' constituting approximately at least of the volume of the bonded batt and irregular, open, voided upper, lower and side surfaces 1S', 16 and 17' thereon.

The flocked, nonwoven textile material 10' further cornprises a resinous adhesive film 20 disposed on and coating the fibers 12 of the batt 11 in a zone extending from the upper surface 15 inwardly to about 10%-35 of the thickness of the batt 11. The flocked material 10 also includes a multiplicity of flock-type textile fibers 21 having one end of each fiber adhered to the plastic film 20 and to the fibers 12 of the batt 11' in the zone of adhesive lilm coating whereby the flock-type fibers 21 penetrate into the voids 14 of the bonded batt 11 and extend therefrom to form a relatively dense, abrasion and wear resistant, flocked surface 22 which conforms generally to the irregular surface of the bonded batt 11 to provide a relief pattern which particularly adapts the flocked material 10 for use as floor coverings.

In the flocked, nonwoven textile material 10"of FIG- URES 3-5, the average lengths of the flock-type textile fibers 21 are preferably shorter than the average cross-I sectional dimensions of the voids 14 of the bonded nonwoven batt 11 so that the flock-type textile fibers will extend substantially radially from and substantially surround each of the fibers 12 of the bonded batt 11 to which they are adhered, as may be seen clearly in FIG- URES 4 and 5, to provide a dense flocked surface 22' on the material 10 and to render the material more resistant to compression due to the partial filling of the voids in the flocked zone of the textile material 10 and to form an integral structure. The average lengths of these flocktype fibers 21 are 1/2 mm. to 2 mm. and the average crosssectional dimensions of the voids 14 are 2 mm. to 5 mm.

The above differences in construction between the material 10 of FIGURES 1 and 2 and the material 10 of FIGURES 3-5 are possible because in FIGURES 1 and 2 the flock-type textile fibers 21 cannot locate or form themselves around and substantially surround each of the fibers 12 in the voids 14 of the bonded batt 11 because their average length is longer than the voids 14 in the bonded batt 11. Conversely, in the material 10' of FIGURES 3- 5, the flock-type textile fibers 21 are shorter than the dimensions of the voids 14' in the bonded batt 11 and,

therefore, locate themselves radially around each of the fibers 12 in the bonded batt 11 when applied thereto.

Each of the flocked, non-woven textile materials 10 and 10 may also include a backing layer 25 and 25', as may be seen in the drawings, which is adhered to the lower surface 16 and 16 of the bonded batts 11 and 11 to provide stability to the flocked materials 10 and 10. This backing layer may be any suitable type of material such as acrylic film, vinyl plastisol, foam, rubber, woven, nonwoven or knitted materials, etc.

The fibers 12 and 12' of the materials 10 and 10 may be of any suitable type of thermoplastic fibers selected from the group consisting of polyester, nylon, acrylic, acetate, modacrylic, triacetate, polypropylene, polyethylene, or combinations thereof and preferably polyester, nylon and polypropylene.

The batts 11 and 11 of thermoplastic fibers 12 and 12 may be bonded together with any resinous bonding material, especially those bonding materials selected from the group consisting of acrylic, vinyls, melamine, butadiene styrene, butadiene acrylonitrile, melamine formaldehyde, polyvinylidene chloride, epoxy-type resins, or combinations thereof.

The flock-type textile fibers 21 and 21 may be of any suitable type, such as those listed above for the fibers 12 and 12 of the bonded batts 11 and 11' and particularly nylon or polyesters and sometimes rayon. As set forth above, the fibers may preferably range in length from 1/2 mm. to 5 mrn.

The resinous adhesive film disposed on and coating the fibers 12 and 12' of the batts 11 and 11 for adherence of the flock-type textile fibers 21 and 21 may be any suitable adhesive bonding material such as those listed above for bonding the nonwoven batt and particularly the acrylics. These adhesives preferably have a viscosity in the range of 2,500 to 7,500 cps. Brookfield at 10 r.p.m. with #5 spindle so as to allow the desired penertation thereof into the bonded nonwoven batt, but still retain the flock-type fibers during the flocking process.

"For producing the above-described flocked, nonwoven materials, the bonded batts 11 and 11 may be produced by forming the fibers 12 and 12 into open, nonwoven, three-dimensional webs in any conventional manner, such as by a Rando-Webber machine, commercially available from the Curlator Corporation of Rochester, N.Y., Proctor-Form and Duo-Form machines, commercially available from Proctor & Schwartz Company of Philadelphia, Pa., Web Former machine, commercially available from James H. Hunter Company of North Adams, Mass., conventional carding and garnetting machines, etc. The fibers in this web are bonded together at spaced points with a suitable bonding material to form an integral nonwoven bonded batt structure by any conventional method, such as spraying the bonding material thereon, immersing the web in a bath of bonding material and extracting the excess, etc.

This bonded, nonwoven batt is then reated with a bonding agent or adhesive for the flock-type fibers by a conventional method such as spraying, dipping, etc., so that the bonding agent or adhesive penetrates into the structure of the bonded, nonwoven batt from l%-35% of the thickness of the batt. This adhesive must be of such quality and viscosity that it will not fill the voids, but will coat the fibers throughout the depths of its penetration.

The bonded, nonwoven batts 11 and 11 with the adhesive thereon is then sent to a conventional electrostatic flocking device wherein cut flock-type textile fibers of the desired length are deposited on and into the bonded, nonwoven batt. These electrostatic flocking devices may be of any conventional type, such as illustrated in U.S. Patents Nos. 2,218,445 and 2,222,539, electrostatic flocking devices which are commercially available from' Eloflock Oberflaechenveredlung GmbH, Stolberger Str. 391, Koeln-Braunsfeld, Germany, or Hug Flock AG, Rupperswil, Switzerland, etc. Conventionally, these electrostatic flocking devices create an electrostatic field between a positive and negative electrode to furnish the forces of attraction. The flock-type textile fibers are given a positive charge and are drawn into the electrostatic field to align themselves in parallel position to the lines of force or flux. They are then impelled downwardly at high Velocity to penetrate the adhesive film on the fibers of the nonwoven batt, which is grounded to the negative electrode. This gives a high distribution of vertically oriented flock-type textile fibers. Preferably, beater bars may be used with the flocking mechanism to obtain better fiber penetration.

The flocked batt, after passing through the electrostatic flocking device, is sent to a curing oven wherein the adhesive is dried and cured and the deposited flocktype fibers firmly and permanently held in place. After leaving this oven, the flocked, nonwoven textile material may be wound in rolls and finished if required, i.e., cutting, slitting, printing, etc.

The present invention has been described in detail above for purposes of illustration only and is not intended to ybe limited by this description or otherwise except as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A flocked, nonwoven textile material suitable for use as floor coverings or the like and particularly characterized by a relief pattern in the flocked surface, said material comprising:

(a) a batt of thermoplastic, bendable, nonbrittle, textile fibers disposed in an intermingled, threedimensional arrangement throughout the length, width and depth of said batt and bonded together at spaced points of contact by a resinous bonding material to xedly join said fibers together to form a high loft, open, low density, bonded, nonwoven batt having a plurality of open, interconnecting voids constituting approximately at least of the volume of said bonded batt and irregular, open, voided upper, lower and side surfaces thereon;

(b) a resinous adhesive film disposed on and coating said fibers of said batt in a zone extending from said upper surface of said batt inwardly to about 10%- 35% of the thickness of said batt; and

(c) a multiplicity of flock-type textile fibers having one end of each fiber adhered to said adhesive film and to said fibers of said batt in said zone of adhesive film coating whereby said flock-type fibers penetrate into the voids of said bonded batt and extend therefrom to form a relatively dense, abrasion and wear resistant flocked surface` thereon which conforms generally to said irregular surface of said bonded batt to provide a relief pattern which particularly adapts said flocked material for use as a floor covering.

2. A flocked, nonwoven textile material, as set forth in claim 1, including a backing layer adhered to said lower surface of said bonded batt to provide stability to said flocked material.

3. A flocked, nonwoven textile material, as set forth in claim 1, in which said resinous adhesive has a viscosity in the range of 2,500 to 7,500 cps. Brookfield at 10 r.p.m. with #5 spindle to insure the desired penetration thereof into said bonded batt.

4. A flocked, nonwoven textile material, as set forth in claim 1, in which the average lengths of said flocktype textile fibers are greater than the average crosssectional dimensions of said voids in said bonded batt so that said flock-type fibers will extend from and generally perpendicular to said upper surface of said bonded batt to provide a high pile surface on said material.

`5. A flocked, nonwoven textile material, at set forth in claim 4, in which the average lengths of said flocktype fibers are 3 mm. to 5 mm. and the average crosssectional dimensions of said voids are 2 mm. to 4 mm.

=6. A flocked, nonwoven textile material, as set forth in claim 1, in Whichthe average lengths of said ock type textile fibers are less than the average cross-sectional iimensions of said voids so that said flock-type bers will extend substantially radially from and substantially surround each of said fibers of said bonded batt to which they are adhered to provide a dense ocked surface on said material and to render said material more resistant to compression.

7. A flocked, nonwoven textile material, as set forth in claim 6, in which the average lengths of said flock-type bers are 1/a mm. to 2 mm. and the average cross-sectional dimensions of said voids are 2 mm. to 5 mm.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS ROBERT F. BURNETT', Primary Examiner W. A. POWELL, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2999763 *Mar 9, 1959Sep 12, 1961Manuf De Feutres De Mouzon AncMethod of applying flock to a fabric
US3152919 *Oct 9, 1961Oct 13, 1964Monsanto CoStabilized acrylic fabrics and method for treatment of acrylic fabrics
US3369948 *Nov 12, 1964Feb 20, 1968Du PontMethod of producing a pile fabric
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3635785 *Jan 19, 1970Jan 18, 1972Beacon Mfg CoStitched nonwoven fabric utilizing a foam layer and a fibrous layer
US3852146 *Oct 2, 1972Dec 3, 1974Lowenstein M And Sons IncContoured article with three dimensional surface thereon
US3887737 *Jun 27, 1972Jun 3, 1975Monsanto ChemicalsLaminate with flocked fiber pile
US3936554 *Apr 19, 1974Feb 3, 1976M. Lowenstein & Sons, Inc.Three dimensional decorative material and process for producing same
US3993806 *Mar 9, 1972Nov 23, 1976Imperial Chemical Industries LimitedFlocking non-woven fabrics
US4293604 *Jul 11, 1980Oct 6, 1981Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyFlocked three-dimensional network mat
US4614679 *Nov 7, 1983Sep 30, 1986The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent mat structure for removal and retention of wet and dry soil
US5806212 *Oct 11, 1996Sep 15, 1998Salomon S.A.Boot with adjustable upper
US6156407 *Nov 17, 1997Dec 5, 2000Wincor Nixdorf Gmbh & Co. KgCleaning card for magnetic strip and chip card read-write devices, method for the production of said cards
US6247215Jun 3, 1998Jun 19, 2001Microfibres, Inc.Printed flocked pile fabric and method for making same
US6350504Jun 3, 1998Feb 26, 2002Microfibres, Inc.Printed flocked pile fabric and method for making same
US6740610 *Apr 17, 2002May 25, 2004L&P Property Management CompanyConvoluted surface fiber pad
US7338697Mar 21, 2003Mar 4, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Co-molded direct flock and flock transfer and methods of making same
US7344769Jul 24, 2000Mar 18, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked transfer and article of manufacture including the flocked transfer
US7351368Jul 3, 2003Apr 1, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked articles and methods of making same
US7364782Dec 13, 2000Apr 29, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked transfer and article of manufacture including the application of the transfer by thermoplastic polymer film
US7381284Jun 4, 2003Jun 3, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked transfer and article of manufacture including the application of the transfer by thermoplastic polymer film
US7390552Sep 23, 2003Jun 24, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked transfer and article of manufacturing including the flocked transfer
US7393576Jan 14, 2005Jul 1, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Process for printing and molding a flocked article
US7402222Jun 4, 2003Jul 22, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked transfer and article of manufacture including the flocked transfer
US7410682Jul 3, 2003Aug 12, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked stretchable design or transfer
US7413581Jul 3, 2003Aug 19, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Process for printing and molding a flocked article
US7465485 *Nov 30, 2004Dec 16, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Process for dimensionalizing flocked articles or wear, wash and abrasion resistant flocked articles
US7491438Jul 11, 2003Feb 17, 2009Milliken & CompanyNeedled nonwoven textile composite
US7632371Oct 22, 2007Dec 15, 2009High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked transfer and article of manufacture including the application of the transfer by thermoplastic polymer film
US7749589Sep 20, 2006Jul 6, 2010High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked elastomeric articles
US7799164Jul 27, 2006Sep 21, 2010High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked articles having noncompatible insert and porous film
US8007889Apr 28, 2006Aug 30, 2011High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked multi-colored adhesive article with bright lustered flock and methods for making the same
US8168262Jun 14, 2010May 1, 2012High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked elastomeric articles
US8206800Nov 2, 2007Jun 26, 2012Louis Brown AbramsFlocked adhesive article having multi-component adhesive film
US8354050Jan 14, 2008Jan 15, 2013High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Co-molded direct flock and flock transfer and methods of making same
US8475905Feb 14, 2008Jul 2, 2013High Voltage Graphics, IncSublimation dye printed textile
US9012005Feb 16, 2010Apr 21, 2015High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked stretchable design or transfer including thermoplastic film and method for making the same
US9051693 *Jan 30, 2014Jun 9, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for manufacturing absorbent sanitary paper products
US9175436Mar 11, 2011Nov 3, 2015High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked articles having a resistance to splitting and methods for making the same
US9193214Oct 14, 2013Nov 24, 2015High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flexible heat sealable decorative articles and method for making the same
US9267241 *May 21, 2015Feb 23, 2016The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for manufacturing absorbent sanitary paper products
US9464387 *Jan 30, 2014Oct 11, 2016The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent sanitary paper product
US9469942 *Jan 30, 2014Oct 18, 2016The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent sanitary paper products
US9517288Jan 13, 2016Dec 13, 2016The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for manufacturing absorbent sanitary paper products
US9562363 *Apr 27, 2014Feb 7, 2017Shanghai Jinka Flooring Technology Co., Ltd.Self bonding floor tile
US9788589 *Dec 1, 2014Oct 17, 2017University Of MassachusettsFlexible, fibrous energy managing composite panels
US20020009571 *Dec 13, 2000Jan 24, 2002Abrams Louis BrownFlocked transfer and article of manufacture including the application of the transfer by thermoplastic polymer film
US20020114918 *Apr 17, 2002Aug 22, 2002L&P Property Management CompanyConvoluted surface fiber pad
US20030186019 *Jun 4, 2003Oct 2, 2003High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked transfer and article of manufacture including the application of the transfer by thermoplastic polymer film
US20030207072 *Mar 21, 2003Nov 6, 2003Abrams Louis BrownCo-molded direct flock and flock transfer and methods of making same
US20040053001 *Jul 3, 2003Mar 18, 2004Abrams Louis BrownProcess for printing and molding a flocked article
US20040081791 *Jul 3, 2003Apr 29, 2004Abrams Louis BrownFlocked articles and methods of making same
US20050158508 *Nov 30, 2004Jul 21, 2005Abrams Louis B.Process for dimensionalizing flocked articles or wear, wash and abrasion resistant flocked articles
US20050268407 *May 26, 2005Dec 8, 2005Abrams Louis BProcess for high and medium energy dye printing a flocked article
US20070022548 *Aug 1, 2006Feb 1, 2007High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Process for heat setting polyester fibers for sublimation printing
US20070102093 *Sep 20, 2006May 10, 2007High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked elastomeric articles
US20070289688 *Sep 4, 2007Dec 20, 2007High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Processes for precutting laminated flocked articles
US20080006968 *Aug 21, 2007Jan 10, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Heat moldable flock transfer with heat resistant, reusable release sheet and methods of making same
US20080095973 *Oct 17, 2007Apr 24, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Laser textured flocked substrate
US20080111047 *Nov 14, 2007May 15, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Rigid mouse pad
US20080124503 *Nov 2, 2007May 29, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked adhesive article having multi-component adhesive film
US20080150186 *Jan 14, 2008Jun 26, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Co-molded direct flock and flock transfer and methods of making same
US20090239025 *Mar 4, 2009Sep 24, 2009High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked articles having a woven graphic design insert and methods of making the same
US20100068447 *Nov 23, 2009Mar 18, 2010High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked slurried thermosetting adhesive article
US20100092719 *Dec 11, 2009Apr 15, 2010High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked transfer and article of manufacture including the application of the transfer by thermoplastic polymer film
US20100143669 *Nov 4, 2009Jun 10, 2010High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Sublimation dye printed textile design having metallic appearance and article of manufacture thereof
US20100209654 *Feb 16, 2010Aug 19, 2010High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked stretchable design or transfer including thermoplastic film and method for making the same
US20100233410 *May 26, 2010Sep 16, 2010High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Wet-on-wet method for forming flocked adhesive article
US20100276060 *Jun 14, 2010Nov 4, 2010High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked elastomeric articles
US20100316832 *Apr 12, 2010Dec 16, 2010High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked article having a woven insert and method for making the same
US20110052859 *Sep 2, 2010Mar 3, 2011High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Processes for precutting laminated flocked articles
US20110223373 *Mar 11, 2011Sep 15, 2011High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked articles having a resistance to splitting and methods for making the same
US20140227475 *Apr 27, 2014Aug 14, 2014Shanghai Jinka Flooring Technology Co., Ltd.Self bonding floor tile
US20150211185 *Jan 30, 2014Jul 30, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent sanitary paper products
US20150211186 *Jan 30, 2014Jul 30, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent sanitary paper product
US20150211187 *Jan 30, 2014Jul 30, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent sanitary paper product
US20160265157 *Mar 10, 2015Sep 15, 2016University Of Massachusetts DartmouthStructured flock fiber reinforced layer
US20160302507 *Dec 1, 2014Oct 20, 2016University Of MassachusettsFlexible, fibrous energy managing composite panels
USRE45802Sep 21, 2012Nov 17, 2015High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked articles having noncompatible insert and porous film
WO2005062834A2 *Dec 17, 2004Jul 14, 2005High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Process for dimensionalizing flocked articles or wear, wash and abrasion resistant flocked articles
WO2005062834A3 *Dec 17, 2004Oct 25, 2007High Voltage Graphics IncProcess for dimensionalizing flocked articles or wear, wash and abrasion resistant flocked articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/89, 428/90, 428/95, 428/96, 156/72
International ClassificationD04H11/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04H11/00
European ClassificationD04H11/00