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Publication numberUS3496297 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 17, 1970
Filing dateMar 14, 1966
Priority dateMar 14, 1966
Publication numberUS 3496297 A, US 3496297A, US-A-3496297, US3496297 A, US3496297A
InventorsBrumberger Richard
Original AssigneeBrumberger Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sound amplifying apparatus
US 3496297 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 17,1970 R. BRUMBERGER 3,495,297

- SOUND AMPLIFYING APPARATUS Filed March 14, 1966 I Q INVENTOR. 52

52 RICHARD BRUMBERGER bee 3' 60 WW ATTORNEYS United States Patent M 3,496,297 SOUND AMPLIFYING APPARATUS Richard Brumberger, Lawrence, N.Y., assignor to Brumberger Company, Inc., Brooklyn, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Mar. 14, 1966, Ser. No. 534,105

, Int. Cl. H04m 1/02 U.S. Cl. 1791 5 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A pick-up assembly comprising a housing defined by cover and mounting plates, both cover and mounting plates having a plurality of aligned apertures and said cover plate having a dome defining a recess. A pick-up head, disposed within the housing comprises a top plate adapted for reception Within the recess and a bottom plate disposed within and extending through an aperture in the housing mounting plate. Suction cups are used to attach the pick-up device and are constructed to enable its head to be snap-fitted into and through the apertures in the mounting plate.

The present invention pertains, generally, to sound amplifying apparatus, and more particularly, to a sound amplifying apparatus and system that is particularly adapted for use with such devices as musical instruments, and the like.

Accordingly, it will be understood that a primary object of the present invention is to provide 'a sound amplifying system and apparatus that is constructed and arranged to be economical of fabrication, capable of manufacture of a minimal number of parts, capable of being assembled with facility, capable of being readily and easily utilized, while yet being sturdy, durable, and presenting a long, useful life.

Another primary object of this invention, in addition to the foregoing objects, is to provide sound amplifying apparatus that is constructed and arranged to enable substantially any individual, young or old alike, to readily utilize the same with facility while yet being unusually efficient and capable of high fidelity.

Yet another primary object of the present invention, in addition to the foregoing objects, is to provide sound amplifying apparatus that is particularly adapted for use with musical instruments, for example, guitars, and the like, and is constructed and arranged to be capable of operative association therewith with facility, and is further constructed and arranged to present a high degree of fidelity.

A further primary object of this invention, in addition to the foregoing objects, is to provide sound amplifying apparatus that is constructed and arranged to be particularly adapted for use with amateur or professional musical instruments, for example, guitars, and the like, is further constructed and arranged to present a high degree of fidelity while yet being fabricated in a simple manner of a minimal number of parts or components, "and is further constructed and arranged to be capable of use in the simplest possible manner.

Other objects and important features of the invention will be apparent from a study of the specification follow ing taken with the drawing, which together, show, illustrate, describe and disclose a preferred embodiment of the invention and what is now considered to be the best mode of practicing the principles thereof, Other embodiments and modifications may be suggested to those having the benefit of the teachings herein, and such other embodiments or modifications are intended to be re- 3,496,297 Patented Feb. 17, 1970 served especially as they fall within the scope and spirit of the subjoined claims.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of sound amplifying apparatus constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention, illustrating the same in operative association with a musical instrument;

FIG. 1A is a cross section taken along the line 1A- 1A of FIG. 1.

FIG. 2 is an exploded view illustrating the parts comprising one of the components of the sound amplifying apparatus illustrated in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a plan view of one of the parts of the components shown in FIG. 2.

With reference now to the drawings, and particularly at first with reference to FIG. 1, there is illustrated therein sound amplifying apparatus generally designated by the reference character 10 illustrated as being disposed in operative association with a musical instrument 12, such as a guitar, for example, or the like. It will be understood at the outset that the musical instrument or guitar 12 is illustrated for exemplary purposes only, and that the sound amplifying apparatus 10 can be utilized with other musical instruments, or for that matter with any device in connection with which it is desired to amplify the sound emanating therefrom. Accordingly, illustration of a guitar is intended by way of example only, and is not in any way intended to be limiting.

The sound amplifying apparatus 10 comprises a sound detector or pick-up 14 and an amplifier 16. With particular reference now to FIGS. 2 and 3, the sound detector or pick-up 14 will be seen to comprise a housing that, in turn, comprises a cover plate 18 and a housing or mounting plate 20. At this point, it will be understood that, in FIG. 2, certain of the parts comprising the sound detector or pick-up 14 are only partially shown since they are symmetrical in configuration and construction.

The cover plate 18 comprises a dome 22 that is generally of tapering or conical configuration to define a recess 24 for a purpose presently to be described. A plurality of apertures 26 extend through the cover 18 for a purpose that will also be set forth hereinafter.

The housing or mounting plate 20 comprises an aperture 28, and a plurality of apertures 30 that correspond in number that are adapted to be disposed in alignment with the apertures 26 extending through the cover 18. To distinguish between the aperture 28, and the apertures 26 and 30, the latter will be denoted as mounting apertures, While the former will be denoted as a pick-up head aperture. Still further, the housing or mounting plate 20 comprises mounting aperatures 32, and to distinguish between these and the mounting apertures 30, the latter will be denoted as cover plate mounting apertures.

The sound detector or pick-up 14 further comprises a pick-up head 34. The pick-up head may be of any suitable and conventional construction, and for example may be an alnico pick-up. The pick-up 34 is particularly adapted to be disposed within the tapered or conical recess 24 in the cover 18, and to be disposed within and extend through the pick-up head aperture 28 in the housing or mounting plate 20.

As pointed out above, the pick-up head 34 may be of any suitable and conventional construction. However, the shape or configuration of the head, and its positional and dimensional relationship with respect to the housing comprising the cover 18 and the mounting plate 20 is of importance. Thus, the head 34 comprises a top plate 36 and a bottom plate 38, the latter in turn comprising apertures 39 to provide a means for transmitting the sound emanating from the instrument or guitar 12. The top plate 36 is of tapering or conical configuration, corresponding generally with the shape or configuration of the dome 22, enabling the head 34 to be received Within the recess 24. The top plate 36 comprises a projection 40 adapted to be disposed substantially in abutting engagement with the roof of the dome 22. In this manner, a space will be defined between the walls of the dome 22 and that of the top plate 36, enabling a conductor 42 comprising a plurality of leads 44 and 46 to extend therealong and outwardly of the sound detector or pick-up 14. To this end, the cover 18 comp-rises a peripheral lip or ledge 48 having a groove 50 through which the conductor 42 extends. One of the leads 44 is adapted to be connected to the projection 40, and the other lead 46 connected to the top plate 36 of the head 34 in any suitable manner, in Order to provide a complete electrical circuit, as will hereinafter be explained.

The bottom plate 38 of the head 34 is generally of cylindrical configuration and, as pointed out above, is paritcularly adapted to extend through and be disposed within the pick-up head mounting aperture 28.

The sound detector or pick-up 14 is particularly adapted to be removably operatively associated with the musical instrument or guitar 12, as particularly illus trated in FIG. 1. To this end, the pick-up 14 further comprises a plurality of attaching elements 52. The elements 52 preferably take the form of grommets or suction cups having a head 54 defining a groove 56 with the body of the grommet or cup. The grommets or cups preferably are fabricated of a material that is both flexible and resilient, such as rubber, or the like, enabling the heads 54 to be press-fitted into the apertures 32 of the mounting plate 20, and snapped therepast. It Will be understood that the diameter of the apertures 32 is substantially the same as that of the grooves 56, and that the diameter of the heads 54 is somewhat larger. Accordingly, the grommets or suction cups 52, when assembled relative to the plate 20, will be firmly but removably held in position with respect thereto. To further ensure this relationship between the grommets and the plate 20, the pick-up 14 further comprises a plurality of collars 58 of semi-circular configuration. After the grommets or suction cups 52 have been inserted into and through the apertures 32, the collars 58 are adapted to be disposed in position partially about the groove 56, and between the head 54 f the grommets and the surface of the mounting plate 20.

The assembly of the pick-up 14 is now considered to be readily apparent to those skilled in the art. The head 34 is disposed within the recess 24 defined by the dome 22. The conductor 42 extends outwardly of the head 14 through the medium of the groove 50 in the lip or ledge 48. The grommets or suction cups 52 are then inserted into and through the apertures 32, and the collars 58 disposed in the position hereinbefore defined. The mounting plate 20 is now disposed in position in the cover plate 18. In this connection, it is noted that the peripheral configuration and dimensions of the mounting plate 20 substantially corresponds with the shape and dimensions defined by the lip or ledge 48. The cover plate mounting apertures 30 in the plate 20 are now disposed in alignment with the apertures 26 in the plate 18. The plates 18 and 20 may now be fixedly secured to one another in any suitable manner, as through the medium of rivets 60, or the like. It is to be noted that the dimensions of the covers 58 preferably are chosen so that they will overlap and extend somewhat outwardly from the periphery or boundary of the mounting plate 20. In this manner, the mounting plate 20 in effect must be snapped into position within the cover plate 18. This feature, in conjunction with the fact that the plates 18 and 20 are fixedly secured to one another through the medium of, for example, the rivets 60 insures a durable and long-lasting construction.

As pointed out above, the dimensions of the head 34 are significant particularly in connection with the positional and dimensional relationship of the head 34 with respect to the housing defined by the plates 18 and 20.

More particularly, the height or depth of the bottom plate 38 of the head 34 is chosen so that it will extend somewhat downwardly from the bottom surface of the mounting plate 20. This is important because, as is considered readily apparent, it is desirable that the head 34 be disposed in juxtaposition with respect to the surface of the musical instrument with respect to which it is particularly adapted to be operatively associated. Moreover, this dimension must be chosen to allow for the front flexing of the grommets or suction cups as they are positioned upon and secured to the surface of the musical instrument. If desired, the height or depth of the bottom plate 38 may be chosen so that after the detector or pick-up 14 is removably but fixedly secured to the surface of the musical instrument, a small space (not shown) will subsist between that surface and the head 34. It has been found that such a small space does not detract from the sound that is amplified by and emanates from the amplifier 16. To insure the correct positional relationship of the head 34 with respect to the housing defined by the plates 18 and 20, the periphery of the recess 24 may be defined by a lip 62, and the periphery of the aperture 28 in the plate 20 defined by a lip 64. As is considered readily apparent, this precludes lateral displacement of the head 34 relative to the housing defined by the plates 18 and 20. The height or depth of the lip 64 is preferably chosen, of course, to preclude interference or contact with the surface of the musical instrument 12. Preferably, this dimension of the lip 64 is also chosen so that the bottom plate 38 will extend somewhat downwardly therefrom for each and every one of the reasons hereinbefore pointed out.

The use and operation of sound amplifying apparatus constructed in accordance with the principles of this invention, such as the apparatus 10, is considered readily apparent in view of the foregoing. A simple moistening of the grommets or suction cups 52 will enable a user to removably but fixedly secure the sound detector or pickup head 14 to the musical instrument 12 at any suitable location. In the case of a guitar, which is illustrated in the drawings for exemplary purposes, this location will preferably be at the bridge 62 of the instrument. The conductor 42 is particularly adapted to be connected to a plug-in jack 64, which may be of any suitable and conventional construction. Preferably, the jack 64 is completely and integrally fabricated of a plastic material, and comprises a plurality of plastic prongs 64a and 64b adapted to cooperate with a corresponding number of apertures in an outlet 66 of the amplifier 16. It is considered readily apparent that the apertures in the outlet 66 are lined with metal inserts 66a and 66b in order to complete a circuit. The leads at the end of the conductor 42 will thus be stripped to expose the electrically conductive material, are then inserted into and through the jack 64 so that the exposed electrically conductive material 65a and 65b of the leads extends through and outwardly of the prongs 65a and 65b. The exposed material is then turned backwardly so that when the prongs are inserted into the apertures of the outlet 66, contact will be made with the linings of the apertures in the outlet. A circuit will thus be defined that is capable of being completed. Moreover, this insures that a construction that is economical of fabrication, comprises a minimal number of parts, and yet is durable and sturdy and capable of a long life will be presented.

The amplifier 16 may also be of any suitable and conventional construction. If desired, the amplifier may comprise its own source of energy (not shown), as for example, one or more dry cells. The amplifier 16 will, in addition, comprise a speaker system (not shown). The circuit (also not shown) is particularly adapted to be controlled by a suitable and conventional on-off volume control knob 68. It has been found that best results will be achieved if the conductor 42 enables the user to position the amplifier 16 approximately five or six feet from the instrument 12, and in that position is faced away from the user.

While the invention has been shown, illustrated, described and disclosed in terms of the embodiments or modifications it has assumed in practice, the scope of the invention should not be deemed to be limited by the precise embodiments or modifications herein shown, illustrated, described or disclosed, such other embodiments or modifications intended to be reserved especially as they fall within the scope of the claims here appended.

What is claimed is:

1. Sound amplifying apparatus comprising, in combination, amplifying structure and an assembly for picking up and transmitting signals to said amplifying structure, said pick-up assembly comprising: a housing defined by a cover plate and a mounting plate, said cover plate having a dome defining a recess, and a plurality of apertures, said mounting plate having a plurality of cover plate mounting apertures adapted to be disposed in alignment with the apertures in said cover plate, enabling said cover plate and mounting plate to be fixedly connected to one another; a pick-up head adapted to be disposed within the housing defined by said cover and mounting plates, and comprising a top plate adapted to be received within the recess defined by the dome of said cover plate, and a bottom plate adapted to be disposed within and extend through an aperture in said mounting plate; attaching elements comprising suction cups having a head adapted to be received within and extend through apertures in said mounting plate, the head of said suction cups being of greater diameter than the apertures in said mounting plate, and said suction cups being constructed and arranged to enable said head to be snap-fitted into and through the apertures in said mounting plate; and a collar for removably and fixedly mounting said suction cups relative to said mounting plate.

2. Sound amplifying apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the bottom plate of said pick-up head is generally of cylindrical configuration, and the height or depth thereof is chosen to enable the bottom plate to extend somewhat downwardly from a bottom surface of the mounting plate of said housing, further enabling said bottom plate to be disposed substantially in juxtaposition with a surface of said signal producing device.

3. Sound amplifying apparatus as defined in claim 5, wherein the recess and the cover of said housing is defined by a peripheral lip, and the aperture in said mounting plate into which said pick-up head is adapted to be disposed is defined by a peripheral lip, the diame'tral dimensional extent of said lips being chosen to preclude lateral displacement of said pick-up head within the housing defined by said cover and mounting plates.

4. Sound amplifying apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein a conductor is connected to said pick-up assembly, and comprises a plug-in jack at another end thereof adapted to be removably disposed within an outlet of said sound amplifying structure, said plug-in jack being of integral construction, and comprising a plurality of prongs into and through which the leads at the other end of said conductor are particularly adapted to extend, the lead at said other end being adapted to extend outwardly of the prongsof said jack, and turned back upon themselves to make contact with the outlet of said sound amplifying structure.

5. Sound amplifying apparatus as defined in claim 4, wherein said plug-in jack is integrally fabricated of a plastic material.

References Cited 1964. Front cover page and page 15.

KATHLEEN H. CLAFFY, Primary Examiner B. P. SMITH, Assistant Examiner US. 01. X.R. 84-267; 179-146; 248206

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3948476 *Dec 5, 1974Apr 6, 1976Shiniti KuniyosiDetachable music stand for use in conjunction with a stringed instrument
US3993388 *Jun 12, 1975Nov 23, 1976Union, Sils, Van De Loo & Co.Cable connection for electrical equipment, particularly illumination equipment on bicycles
US4361736 *Dec 7, 1979Nov 30, 1982Long Edward MPressure recording process and device
US4569077 *Dec 30, 1983Feb 4, 1986Anthony MarinelliTransducer mounting assembly
US7390950 *Dec 23, 2005Jun 24, 2008Hollander Ryan SAcoustic microphone support bracket
US9240170 *Dec 3, 2012Jan 19, 2016Petar ChekardzhikovVibration-sensing stringed instrument mountable device
US9548044 *Dec 3, 2014Jan 17, 2017Petar ChekardzhikovVibration-sensing music instrument mountable device
US20070144329 *Dec 23, 2005Jun 28, 2007Hollander Ryan SAcoustic microphone support bracket
US20080061195 *Sep 11, 2006Mar 13, 2008Carnevali Jeffrey DUniversal pole caddy
US20080061197 *Sep 11, 2006Mar 13, 2008Carnevali Jeffrey DUniversal detachable presentation bracket
US20080061210 *Sep 11, 2006Mar 13, 2008Carnevali Jeffrey DSheet music stand
US20140150627 *Dec 3, 2012Jun 5, 2014Petar ChekardzhikovVibration-sensing stringed instrument mountable device
US20150082970 *Dec 3, 2014Mar 26, 2015Petar ChekardzhikovVibration-sensing music instrument mountable device
USD732080Oct 7, 2013Jun 16, 2015Bose CorporationAudio system accessory
Classifications
U.S. Classification381/118, 84/267, 984/365, 984/368, 248/362, 439/502, 381/120
International ClassificationG10H3/00, G10H3/18, G10H3/14
Cooperative ClassificationG10H3/146, G10H3/181
European ClassificationG10H3/18B, G10H3/14D