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Publication numberUS3496694 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 24, 1970
Filing dateMar 4, 1968
Priority dateMar 4, 1968
Publication numberUS 3496694 A, US 3496694A, US-A-3496694, US3496694 A, US3496694A
InventorsPatrick A Hicks, Charles H C Van Pelt
Original AssigneeHicks Van Pelt Joint Venture
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Artificial facing method
US 3496694 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb.24,1-970 RA. HICKS Em. :#.,4.f6,694

A ARTIFICIAL FAGING METHOD Filed March 4, 1968 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS. PATRICK A. HICKS.

CHARLES H. o. VAN PEur. BY

i ATRNEYS.

Feb. 24, 1970 P A. HlcKs ET AL 3,496,694

ARTIFICIAL FACINC METHOD Filed March 4, 1968 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 FSGS F 6 INVENTORS.

PATRICK A. HICKS. CHARLES H. C. VAN PELT.

BY f n i vrolrmiaxrsl Fel)o 24, 1970 P, A HlcKs ET AL ARTIFICIAL FACING METHOD Filed March 4, 1968 3 Sheets-Sheet f5 INVENTORS. PATRICK A., HICKS. CHARLES H. C. VAN PELT. BY

ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent O U.S. Cl. 52-746 1 Claim ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE This invention discloses a prefabricated artificial facing of space formations and method of making the same cornprising a prefabricated :material giving the appearance of brick, stone or other masonite material which may be readily attached to the frame of a building With the minimum of labor and thus maintaining a relatively low `construction cost and reduced maintenance cost. The material itself `consists of an assemblage of decorative light weight molded brick or other shapes suitable for interior or exterior wall facings preferably having a porous or non porous flexible member bonded to said decorative members and -being capable of absorbing the stresses and strains on the assemblage caused by movement or expansion or contraction of the building materials.

This invention relates to an artificial facing and a method of making the same and, more particularly, to a prefabricated artificial facing of spaced formations adapted to be permanently mounted on an inner or outer Wall of a building and a method of making the same.

An important object of this invention is to provide molded formations having porous or non-porous but flexible material between such formations which is bonded to or securely anchored into the molded formations and extending therefrom to provide a flexible joint which flexible joint can be fastened to a wall support or to a wall panel and thereby provide a means of substantially avoiding cracks in such molded formations.

A principal objective of this invention is to provide an assemblage of decorative light weight molded bricks or other shapes suitable for exterior or interior wall facing, and while molding such formations to have a porous or non-porous flexible member bonded to or securely anchored into the molded formations; with the flexible members separating each of the molded formations into spaced relation with the contiguous molded formations, and with the flexible member being suitable for thereafter securely fastening the assemblage of Such molded formations to a wallboard or other member of a building or the like but leaving the rear faces of the individual molded formations un-adhered and not directly fastened to the wallboard or member, and with the flexible member being `capable of absorbing the stresses and strains on the assemblage caused by movement or by expansion and contraction of the building materials, thereby avoiding cracking of the molded bricks or the other molded formations which have not been adhered to and are not directly fastened to the wallboard or building member.

Another object of this invention is to provide a method of forming an artificial facing of spaced formations either rectangular or irregular shapes or combinations thereof various surfaces, sizes, and colors.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a low cost means of producing a wall facing for either interior or exterior use which incorporates (within the same assem-blage of molded formations or in separate assemblages) various surface designs, various colors, various shapes such as of regular or irregular stones orblocks; or

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with various inserts within an individual block or stone such as pieces of colored glass, crushed marble or the like.

Other objects of this invention are to:

(a) Provide a light weight product to reduce production, shipping and installation costs.

(b) To provide flexibility between each of the separate molded formations on a finished panel, so as to resist cracking of the individual formations incident to stresses and strains caused by the movement of the building Walls on which the panel is mounted.

(c) To provide additional strength to each of the separate molded formations within a completed panel consisting of one or more assemblages.

(d) To provide means, between the molded formations, for using fasteners to securely hold the assemblage of molded formations to a panel or building member.

(e) To provide for interior walls, which cannot support the weight of many of the commercially available exterior Wall facings, a light weight decorative wall facing which duplicates in both feel and surface appearance exterior wall facing brick products, and while adequate in strength is easier and safer to install.

(f) To provide a means to key the applied grouting material `between the individual molded shapes.

(g) To provide a wall facing panel which before installation can be rolled for `convenient shipping or storage.

(h) To provide a wall facing panel with the above features and advantages either With or without the applied grouting.

(i) To provide a wall facing panel containing a number of variety of separate molded shapes or formations with each of the finished molded formations having a decorative surface, and with each separate molded forrnation being strengthened by a screen or mesh or uneven surface material embedded into each molded formation and located opposite to the decorative surface of each formation.

(j) To provide a means of suitably mounting a number of such panels on to a wall.

(k) To provide a means of embedding a screen or mesh or other flexible material away from the back of each molded formation, and keeping those parts of the screen or mesh or flexible material which are Ibetween each molded formation, comparatively free from the molding material so as subsequently, by use of the open mesh: (l) to fasten the molded formations to a Wall or to a panel, and (2) to provide a key for better holding of later applied grouting material between the separate molded formations.

(l) To use an assembly of individual cavity molds to mold a group of rectangular and/or irregularly shaped formations, with the designed bottom of each cavity mold being used to provide a decorative exterior surface on each separate molded formation; and, when molded, the formations are spaced from each other by an open mesh or open screen which mesh or screen is also molded into the separate formations behind the decorative face of the formation, and with the assembly or panel of the finished formations being used as an interior or exterior wall facing.

(m) To provide a decorative wall surface for inside or exterior use, consisting of molded formations made from cementitious, plaster, plastic or other suitable decorative moldable materials, with each formation having a decorative surface which is finish-formed rwhile in the mold, with each formation including a porous or non-porous flexible sheet embedded at the time of molding and placed so as to be parallel with and behind the decorative surface of each formation and with the flexible member connecting each molded formation with others within the same group or panel.

Other objects, uses, and advantages of this invention are apparent upon a reading of this description, which proceeds with reference to the drawings forming part thereof and wherein:

FIGURE l is a perspective view, partly in section, showing portions of one kind of completed artificial facings of the present invention.

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view of a portion of the structure of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary top plan view of a mold used in forming the artificial facing of the present invention showing cavities for the molding of stones or other irregularly shaped formations.

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view taken along the line 4-4 of FIGURE 3 and showing molding material within the cavities in the mold.

FIGURES 5 is a fragmentary top plan view, similar to FIGURE 3, and showing the next step in forming the artificial facing of the present invention after the mold is filled with the molding material as shown in FIGURE 4.

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view taken along the line 66 of FIGURE 5.

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view of a complementary grid mold for use in forming the artificial facing of the present invention.

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary sectional view, similar to FIGURE 4, and showing the complementary grid mold of FIGURE 7 in position with molding material added to the receptacles or cavities of the grid mold.

FIGURE 9 is a sectional view of the artificial facing of the present inventionvafter both the mold and the complementary grid mold have been removed but without any grouting added thereto.

FIGURE 10 is a top plan view of the artificial facing of FIGURE 9.

FIGURE ll is a top plan view of an artificial facing having spaced formations of different sizes.

FIGURE 12 is a fragmentary sectional view of an artificial fa-cing of the present invention wherein it may be utilized on a corner of a building or the like.

Referring to the drawings and particularly FIGURE l, there is shown a plurality of molded formations 1t) of molding material mounted at spaces 14, with fasteners 28 to a wallboard 11 holding flexible member 25 (see FIGURES 5 and 6) which functions as a support member indirectly for the formations 10. The molded formations 1i) are spaced from each other by the flexible member 25 and after mounting the exposed flexible members 25 are covered with grouting 12 such as a mortar-like substance, for example, disposed within the spaces 1 4 between the molded formations 10.

When the formations 10 resemble artificial bricks, for example, wherein a symmetrical arrangement is employed, the wallboard 11 may have either a rectangular or irreg= ular shape using a broken configuration as shown in FIG- URE 1 since usuallyY only whole molded formations are utilized on each of the Wallboards 11. Furthermore, the various edges of the wallboard 11 are either undercut or notched for cooperation with the adjacent assemblies.

Thus, the wallboard 11 has its top edge l5 undercut while its bottom edge 16 is notched. Additionally, the wallboard 11 has its left edge 17, as viewed in FIGURE 1, notched while its right hand edge 18 is undercut.

It should be understood that any edge, which is parallel to the top edge and the bottom edge 16, formed due to the recessed arrangement of the wallboard 11 will be undercut or notched depending on whether it is above or rbelow the cooperating edge of the adjacent wallboard. For example, edge 19 of the wallboard 11 would be notched in the same manner as the lower edge 16 is since it is disposed above a portion of the adjacent wallboard. Likewise, edge 20 of the wallboard 11 would be undercut since it is disposed below a portion of the adjacent wallboard.

It should be understood that the wallboard 11 could have a rectangular shape when the formations 10 are irregular in shape and are formed to imitate a non-symmetrical product rather than a symmetrical type of structure such as bricks.

In forming the artificial facing of the present invention, a mold 21 (see FIGURES 3 and 4), which has a plurality of preferably flexible receptacles or cavities 22 formed therein, is utilized. While the cavities 22 are shown in FIGURE 3 as having a rectangular shape, it should be understood that the cavities 22 may have any desired reetangular or irregular configuration depending upon what the artificial facing of the present invention is duplicating.

Furthermore, the cavities 22 may be of different depths whereby the molded rectangular and/or irregularly shaped formations 10 are formed with different thicknesses and shapes. Thus, as clearly shown in FIGURE 4, one of the cavities 22 has a greater depth than the other. Additionally, portions of the same cavity 22 may be of different depths whereby the molded rectangular and/or irregularly shaped formation 10, such as a stone shape, is formed with different thicknesses and shapes.

Since the bottom of the configurated cavities 22 forms the front face or other surface of the finished formations 10 that will appear when the molded facing unit is mounted on a wall, for example, the configuration of each of the molded formations 10 may be varied. For example, one of the configurated cavities 22 in FIGURE 3 has a plurality of elements 23 disposed therein to cause the molded formations 10 formed therein to have a nonsmooth outer surface. Others can simulate the size and shape of stones and other shapes.

The mold 21 may be formed of either a flexible or rigid material so that the mold 21 may be readily separated from the molded formations 10 after they have been formed. For example, the mold 21 may be formed of a suitable plastic material or of rubber.

Before the molding material is added to the cavities 22 in the mold 21, the mold 21 is preferably permanently lubricated or lubricated by dipping the mold 21 in a suitable material such as oil, for example. This permits the molded formations 10 to be more easily separated from the mold 21 after they have been formed therein.

As shown in FIGURE 4, molding material 24 is added to the cavities 22 within the mold 21 to the level of the top of the mold 21. One suitable example of the molding material 24 is formed by mixing one part by volume of cement with three parts by volume of fine sand. Color is then added to the mixture of cement and sand to provide the desired color of the finished formation. Sufiicient water is then added to the mixture to produce a fairly dry mix. Whenever cementitious, plaster, asbestos, or plastic compounds or a combination thereof are used for the molding material 24, the mixture may include one or more additives to expedite drying or hardening or as a waterproofer or moisture retardant, or to avoid cracking of the finished formations.

It should be understood that a plurality of different colors of the molding material 24 may be supplied to the cavities 22 of the mold 21. That is, the color of the molding material 24 in one of the cavities 22 of the mold 21 may be dark red while the color may be light red in another of the cavities 22 of the mold 21. Thus, this would produce a wall facing having the appearance of different colored formations rather than a single color.

One or more decorative designs may be molded, within the bottom of cavities 22, into what becomes the outer or front face of the finished formations when they are subsequently mounted on a wall of wallboard. For instance, the bottoms of various cavities 22 of a rnold 21 may be designed so that the outer face of the molded bricks have any selected design such as the appearance of bricks from an old wall with each molded brick having a different configuration or even having broken corners.

After 'the cavities 22 in the mold 21 have been filled with the molding material 24, the open mesh member 25 (see FIGURES 5 and 6) is then placed over the top of the mold 21. The open mesh member 25 is preferably at least the same size as the mold 21. The open mesh member 25 is preferably a plastic screen such as nylon or fiber glass. It also may be formed of aluminum, copper, or steel, for example. It is preferred that the open mesh member 25 be of non-rusting material.

As shown in FIGURE 8, a complementary grid mold 26 (see FIGURE 7) is then disposed on top of the mesh member 25 which is on the mold 21. The grid mold 26 has a plurality of openings 27 therein of exactly the same shape and spacing as the sidewalls of cavities 22 in themold 21 so that the grid mold 26 complements the mold 21 when aligned therewith. The procedure when using the grid mold 26 is:

(a) Fill cavities 22 of the mold 21 with molding material 24 to approximately the top level of the cavities 22.

(b) Place the mesh member 25 on top of the mold 21.

(c) Place the grid mold 26 in position on top of the mesh member 25. Apply more of the molding material 24 through the openings 27 to the top level of the grid mold 26 while the member 25 is between the mold 21 and the grid mold 26, and is thereby molded into the formations 10. The placement of the grid mold 26 keeps the edges around each of the formations substantially clear for later use when fastening to the wallboard 11 or .af-:wall and for subsequent use when receiving the grouting 12.

This method embeds the mesh member 25 into the molded formations 10. The member 25 is thus located parallel to and behind the decorative surface face of the finished formations 10 when the formations are mounted on a wall.

In this invention one or more designs are molded into what becomes the outer or front face 0f the finished product while the open mesh member 25 becomes embedded well within the finished formations 10 and is held in this position by the extra material which is added to the formations 10 when filling the grid mold 26. Depending upon the flowing ability and liquidity of the molding material 24, such as plaster or ingredients containing certain plastic such as liquid vinyl, only one pouring of the molding material may be required to fill the openings 27 in the grid mold 26 and the receptacles in a single or twopiece cavity mold during which the mesh member 25 will be properly embedded into the spaced formations 10, but the mesh member 25 will be substantially clear of the molding material 24 in the areas between the spaced formations 10.

It should be understood that the grid mold 26 may be completely separate from the mold 21 or could be hingedly connected thereto if desired.

The grid mold 26 preferably has a more shallow depth than that of cavity 22 in mold 21. However, the grid mold 26 has sufficient thickness to provide a backing for the molded formations 10. It should be understood that there may be instances wherein it is desired that the grid mold 26 be as thick as the mold 21.

Since the mold 21 has its vertical walls, which form the cavities 22, aligned with the vertical walls, which define the openings 27, of the grid mold 26, the spaces between the vertical walls form the Spaces 14 between the formations 10. Thus, the portions of the open mesh members 25 extending across the spaces 14 are kept reasonably clean of the molding material 24.

The grid mold 26 may be removed from the mold 21 as soon as the molding material 24 Within the openings 27 has set sufiiciently to prevent any of the molding material 24 from fiowing into the spaces 14. Thereafter, drying or curing continues for a sufficient time to season or cure the formations 10. When cementitous materials are used as the molding material 24 this curing or drying is preferably accomplished by a combination of moisture and heat. The length of the curing or drying cycle, the quantity of heat, and the quantity of moisture varies in accordance with the size, and physical qualities desired in the completed formations 10.

After the molded material is set, the mold 21 may be separated from the molded formations 10. The front faces of each of the formations 10 have the same surface design as was in the bottom of each of the cavities 22 of the mold 21.

When no complementary grid-mold 26 is used, the molding material 24 may be poured into the cavities 22 to the top edge of the mold 21. Then the open mesh member 25 is placed on top of the mold 21. The mesh member 25 is then embedded into the molding material 24 within the cavities 22 of the mold 21, so as, upon setting of the molding material 24, to bond the mesh member 25 to the molded product. Also, under this procedure, the mesh screen is located parallel with and behind the decorative face of the finished formations 10.

When the mesh chamber 25 is molded into or near the back of the finished product, a finished product can be molded in long strips of any desired length and width, and the finished strip may be rolled for packaging or shipping in convenient size rolls for either interior or exterior usage.

The embedded fiexible member 25 not only holds the separate molded formations 10 together but adds strength and support thereto. Because of the spaces 14 between the molded formations 10, a complete assemblage of molded formations 10 and the bonded open mesh member 25 may be easily secured to either the wallboard 11 or to a wall directly without the wallboard 11 by nails 28 or the like extending through the open mesh member 25 into the wallboard 11 or the wall, As clearly shown in FIGURE 1, the nails 28 securely fasten the fiexible member 25 to the wallboard 11, but leaves the individual molded formations un-adhered and unbonded to the wall. Various other means of fastening may be substituted for nails.

Instead of using the mesh member 25, the desired flexibility, between the molded formations and also between separate panels which contain a number of such formations, may be accomplished by using non-porous and non-mesh plastic or other fiexible sheet materials or strips which have uneven or Waffle-type surfaces and are securely anchored into, or bonded to, or embedded in the molded formations; the portions of such flexible material extending from the sides of such molded formations being spaced to provide space for grouting with the same extended flexible portions also capable of absorbing stresses and strains caused by expansion and contraction or settling of the wall supports or of the materials in the molded formations, thereby substantially avoiding cracks in the molded formations.

The open mesh member 25 may be wrapped around the edges of the wallboard 11 in the preferred arrangement. Wrapping of the open mesh member 25 around the edges of the wallboard 11 insures a more secure connection of the open mesh member 25 and the formations 10 to the wallboard 11.

After the assemblage of the molded formations 10 is attached to the wallboard 11, by the open mesh member 25 being secured to the wallboard 11 by the fasteners 28 allof the spaces 14 may be filled with the grouting 12 such as a mortar-like substance. The grouting 12 also may be disposed on the exterior surface of the undercut edges (the edges 15, 18, and 20) of the wallboard 11. Thus the notched edges (the edges 16, 17, and 19) of the wallboard 11 do not have the grouting 12 thereon but these are overalpped by the undercut edges of the adjacent wallboards 11 so that the notched edges are not visible (see FIGURE 2).

The grouting 12 covers the nails 28 except any of the nails 28 securing the open mesh member 25 to the notched edges `of the wallboard 11; the nails 28, which secure the open mesh member 25 to the notched edges of the wallboard 11, are covered by the overlapping undercut edge of the adjacent wallboard 11. Accordingly, an

artificial facing wall may be formed with substantially all of the labor performed within the factory on an assembly line basis so that the cost is substantially reduced.

One suitable example of the mortar-like substance, which is the grouting 12, could be formed by mixing two parts by volume of sand with one fourth of a part by volume-of hydrated lime and one part by volume of portland cement. Water is added to this mixture for a dry mix. Instead of employing the mortar-like substance as the grouting 12, a vinyl or otherplastic material could be employed.

As previously mentioned, the edges of the wallboard 11 are notched and undercut for cooperation with the edges of adjacent wallboards 11. The notched edges of the wallboard 11 have nails (one shown at 30 in FIGURE 2) extending therethorugh for attachment to one of studs 31 of the building to which the artificial facing units of the present invention may be attached. The surfaces of other of the studs 31 of the building may be coated with a suitable moisture proof adhesive or mastic. This adhesive or mastic may also be applied to the matching contacting surfaces of the wallboard 11.

When the undercut edge of one of the wallboards 11 is positioned over the notched or recessed edge of the adjacent of the wallboards 11, the nails 30 are hidden from view (sce FIGURE 2). Furthermore, the adhesive or mastic may be disposed on both of these edges to insure bonding therebetween.

When, as previously mentioned, the exterior surfaces of the undercut edges of the wallboard 11 have the grouting 12 disposed thereon, each of the undercut edges of the wallboard 11 can have the gro-uting 12 of the same width as the grouting 12 in each of the spaces14. Accordingly, when a plurality of the artificial facing units or members is mounted on the studs 31 of a building, the artificial facing members can present a continuous wall of the formations 10 with spaces, which are filled with -grouting 12, of equal width therebetween.

From the foregoing, it is observed that the only labor required at the construction site may be to attach the wallboards 11 to the studs 31. There is little requirement of any addition of the grouting 12 or any [other expensive labor procedures.

The open mesh member 25 provides the following advantages to the finished molded formations 10.

(1), By being embedded in each molded formation, the mesh member 25 strengthens each formation and permits use of a lighter weight product having adequate strength and low manufacturing, shipping and installation costs.

(2) By extending outside and between the separate molded formations 10, the mesh member 25:

(a) Provides a means of assembling and connecting two or more molded formations 10 of various designs or colors into a fixed pattern or position in the assembly or on a wall.

(b) Provides a flexible cushion to avoid shock and to allow for expansion and contraction or movement of the wall without normal damage to the mounted wall facing.

(c) Provides a means of keying the applied .grouting 12 in the spaces 14 between the molded formations 10.

(d) Provides the lspaces 14 and means of securing or fastening the molded formations to a supporting panel or wall.

(e) Provides a means of locating the mesh member 25 parallel to and behind the surface front of the molded formation, or of locating the mesh member 25 closer to the back, or closer to the surface faces of the formations for improved strength and to control the depth of the grouting to be applied in spaces 14.

(f) By omission of the grouting or appropriate placement of the mesh member 25 provides a means |whereby long panels may be rolled for convenient shipping and storage.

The cavities 22 in the mold 21 provide a suitable means whereby a variety of sizes, as in 34 of FIGURE 11 or of rectangular and/or irregular shapes of molded formations having an embedded open mesh member may be produced, having 'various colors, decorative designs and configurations, and/or surface inserts within the same panel. The panel is an assembly of one or more assemblages of molded formations.

Of course, if the flexible member 25 is attached directly to a wall rather than to the wallboard 11, the grouting 12 would have to be added to the spaces 14 between each molded formation and/or on the perimeter of the artificial facing units at the contruction site. Of course, this would normally only be employed where remodeling of an existing structure is planned. Even when attaching to a wall rather than the studs 31 of a building, it would still |be preferable to secure the open mesh member 25 to the wallboard 11 and attach the wallboard 11 to the building in a suitable manner.

In order to have prefabricated artificial facing units or members available for an entire structure, it is necessary to provide corner members. One type of corner construction is shown in FIGURE 12 and is L-shaped in cross section. The formations 10 would be formed in an L- shaped mold (not shown). The open mesh member 25 would be bonded in the same manner to the molding material 24 by the use of an L-shaped complementary grid mold (not shown).

The open mesh member 25 would be secured to an L shaped support member 32, which preferably is formed of two wallboards attached to each other at substantially right angles, in the same manner as described previously for attachment to the wallboard 11. The support member 32 'would have its edges undercut and notched or recessed in the same manner as the wallboard 11 for the same purpose.

In addition to functioning as a support for the bonded open mesh member 25 and indirectly for the molded formations 10, the wallboard 11 also functions as a moisture barrier between the formations 10 and the interior of the building on which the artificial facing member is mounted. The wallboard 11 also functions as a heat and cold insulator. It also aids in strengthening any wall upon the artificial facing assemblage is mounted.

The use of the open mesh member 25 not only adds strength to the finished product but also provides sufficient flexibility to avoid cracking ,of the mounted formations 10. This flexibility allows for the normal expansion and contraction present in molded materials and in the movement of the walls to which the artificial facing is mounted. Thus, the rigidity, which normally causes cracking of ordinary bricks and stones when they are secured to a rigid wall, is avoided.

Another method of manufacture is to reverse the previously stated normal means of manufacture whereby the decorative face of the separately molded formations together with the spaces between the molded formations which expose the flexible member between such formations are formed by a die or roller applied to the partly solifed mastic material.

More specifically, the means of producing the product when a roller or flat die may be used is as follows:

(a) A sheet of open mesh flexible material 25 is placed into position with or Iwithout a grid mold on a nonadhering piece of rigid material. (The bottom and walls of the flat mold-form may be lubricated or otherwise pre pared to avoid the molding material adhering to it.) The grid mold being used when it is desirable to have the flexible material placed a-way from the back face of the separate molded formations. If no grid mold is used, the moldable material may be applied directly on top of the flexible mesh material.

(b) A layer of the moldable material of proper thickness is then applied on top of the flexible material.

(c) While the moldable material is in a partly solified state, apply a flat die or roller containing the face pattern of the finished molded formations and also containing spacers to separate the molded formations and expose the exible material between the molded formations.

(d) When the material is solified, place the assemblage of molded formations with the exposed flexible material between the molded formations over the proper size of wallboard or curtain material.

(e) Staple or stitch or otherwise fasten the flexible material to the wallboard or other backing material while keeping the individual molded formations unbonded to the wallboard or backing material so that the flexible material between the individual molded formations cari protect the formations against the effects of stresses and strains.

(f) Apply the grouting to the flexible material between the molded formations and covering the fasteners. The above procedure will provide a finished prefabriated panel or curtain such as 4' X `8' ready to apply as a curtain to the outside or inside of a wall. With the said assembly containing flexible joints lbetween the molded formations, stresses and strains, which are applied to either the building member or to the panel, will be absorbed by the flexible or mesh material between` the separate formations.

The above procedure is substantially identical to FIG- URE 8 if the illustration of FIGURE 8 were turned upside down and if the mold 21 were viewed as a die being pressed into the cementitious material 24 which has been placed upon the flexible or mesh material 25.

An advantage of this invention is that the formations of the artificial facing may have varying sizes such as illustrated at 34 in FIGURE 11 and further have varying surfaces. AnotherA advantage of this invention is that'the artificial facing many be installed without any nails being visible and little necessity of grouting being added after the artificial facing is mounted on a building. A further advantage of this invention is that construction labor expense is substantially reduced due to prefabrication of the artificial facing.

Also, the stated method of fastening the individual flexible members 1'4 to the wall panel or to an inner wall, while leaving the molded formations unad'hered to the panel or wall, avoids having lower courses of brick carry the weight of higher courses of brick whereby weight of the upper courses of bricks does not have to be sustained by the lower courses; and, stresses or strains upon one or more bricks are not transferred to others, but are absorbed by the flexible member 14; and, any failure to properly fasten olie or more panels, which contain the new molded formations, to an inner wall does not, by accumulation of weight or transfer of stresses affect other panels or other molded formations on the same wall. By this means, the high costs of replacing large areas of fallen bricks, when low-grade improperly cured mortar is used can be avoided.

For purposes of exemplification, particular embodiments of the invention have been shown afd described according to the best present understanding thereof. However, it will be apparentthat changes and modifications in the arrangement and construction of the parts thereof may be resorted to without departing from the spirt and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A method of making an artificial facing having spaced formations comprising the steps of Aadding molding material to spaced 'cavities in a mold;` leveling the molding material within the cavities to theheight of the cavities, placing thereonpa flexible memberbeing at least the size of the mold, placing a complemenfary grid mold having openings aligned with the cavities iriit'he first mentioned mold on the first mentioned mold, filling the openings withn the grid mold with molding material, separating the first mentioned" mold and the grid mold from spaced formations lformed by the cavities land the openings after the spaced formations are at least sufciently set to maintain their shapes, and curing ,the spaced formations while forming a bond with the flexible member whereby the spaced forrations separated f'rlom each other by portions of the flexible member are formed, forming a support member of approximately the same size as the flexible member and undercutting one ofeach set of its opposed edges on one side, and notching out the other of each set on the other;l side to permit overlapping with support members of adjacent artificial facings, wrapping edge portions of the flexible member about the notched and undercut edges of the support member to be overlapped with like support members of adjacent artificial facings and securing said edge portions of said flexible member in place.

References Cited UNITED ySTATES PATENTS 1,592,591 7/ 1926 Amele 52-314 1,853,824 4/1932 Krauss 52--3-84 1,960,979 5/ 1934 Robinson 52--385 2,122,577 7/1938 Mattes et al. i 52--314 2,836,529 5/1958 Morris 52-309 2,851,330 9/1958 Taylor 264-338 FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner JAMES L. RIDGILL, IR., Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

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Referenced by
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US3908326 *Dec 20, 1973Sep 30, 1975Gerald T FrancisBrick panel construction
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/746.12, 52/314, 264/34, 52/391
International ClassificationB28B23/00, B29C35/02, B29C70/68, B29C39/00, B29C33/00, E04F13/08, B29C67/24
Cooperative ClassificationB29C70/688, B28B23/0012, B29L2031/722, B29C67/243, B29C35/0222, B29C33/0022, B29C2791/001, E04F13/0862, B29C39/00
European ClassificationB29C35/02B, B29C70/68C, B29C33/00C, B28B23/00B, B29C67/24C2, E04F13/08C