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Publication numberUS3496814 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 24, 1970
Filing dateApr 25, 1967
Priority dateApr 22, 1967
Publication numberUS 3496814 A, US 3496814A, US-A-3496814, US3496814 A, US3496814A
InventorsBessim Bessim
Original AssigneeCanadian Converters Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of blending designs
US 3496814 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 24, 1970 a. BESSIM METHOD OF BLENDING nnsmus Filed April 25, 1967' INVENTOR Bessim BESSIM United States Patent Int. Cl. B26d 7/20 US. C]. 83-29 4 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Blending designs, while stacking plies of cloth for subsequent cutting about a pattern, includes beaming parallel reference light images down on the last ply of cloth. The reference images are beamed on selected points on the design and subsequent plies of cloth are adjusted to match the reference images on similar points.

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for blending designs of flat articles which are intended to be stacked, and particularly for blending designs of plies of cloth in a predetermined pattern area.

Heretofore, such apparatus included a work platform and pins either extending upwardly from the work table or implanted manually. When it is required to match or blend designs of a series of plies on such apparatus, the plies must be positioned one by one over the pinpoints and then pushed down over the last-positioned ply allowing the pins to penetrate the ply. It is difficult to properly match the designs, due to inherent irregularities depending on the fabric quality over the pinpoints without overstretching or otherwise from wrinkles in the plies. Also, the height at which the pins extend over the table must be short and therefore, the amount of plies which can be stacked in one batch is limited.

It is a purpose of the present invention to provide a method which enhances the accuracy and speed at which the designs on such plies of cloth are blended. It is also a purpose of the present invention to provide an apparatus on which there are no pins or other physical obstructions which limit the height at which the plies can be stacked or cause overstretching or wrinkling of the cloth.

A method, in accordance with the present invention, for stacking plies of cloth having similar designs so that the designs will match in a predetermined pattern area, comprises applying a first ply of cloth bearing a design on a surface, selecting reference points on the design of said ply of cloth, projecting guide mark images on said reference points, superimposing a second ply of cloth having a similar design over the first ply of cloth and adjusting the second ply of cloth so that similar reference points on its design will coincide with the projected guide mark images, repeating this step until the required amount of plies have been stacked and cutting all the plies simultaneously in accordance with said predetermined pattern.

The apparatus for carrying out this method comprises a work table having a friction surface, a frame adapted to be located over said table, the frame adjustably mounting at least two light projectors arranged to project parallel light beams downwardly toward said table. More than two projectors would be necessary mostly for big patterns as for fronts.

Having thus generally described the nature of the invention, particular reference will be made to the accompanying drawings, showing by way of illustration, a preferred embodiment thereof and in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the apparatus taken from the front;

3,496,814 Patented Feb. 24, 1970 ice FIGURE 2 is a vertical cross section taken along line 22 in FIGURE 1 and showing the construction of the light projector;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the step of cutting a stack of plies of cloth; and

FIGURE 4 is a top plan view taken along line 44 in FIGURE 2.

Referring now to the drawings, and specifically to FIG- URE 1, the apparatus is shown as including a work table 10 which has a rough friction surface 11 and can be provided with a plurality of holes 12. The table 10 is mounted for movement on rollers 16. Adjustable legs 14 are also provided to stabilize the table when it is in a working position.

An upright 18 is provided on either side of the table 10 and is supported by a lean-to support 20. A rail member 22 is provided at the top limit of each upright 18 and extends horizontally over the table 10 in a spaced-apart and parallel relation with the table 10 and its companion rail member 22.

In the embodiments shown in FIGURE 1, a horizontally extending lateral support 23 extends between the uprights 18. A fixed beam is mounted laterally of the rail members 22 and is connected at each end to the rail members 22. A parallel traveling beam 28, which includes apertures 29 at each end, is adapted to fit on the rail member 22 and moves in a parallel relation to the fixed member 26. Locking screws 30 are provided at each end of the traveling beam 28, which, when tightened, bear against the rail member 22 to lock the traveling beam 28 in position.

In the present case, a pair of projectors 32 are shown each mounted on the beams 26 and 28. Each projector 32, as shown in FIGURE 2, includes a housing 36 on which is secured a sliding bracket 34, which is in turn adapted to slide on either beam 26 or 28. A socket 38 is provided in the uppermost portion of the housing 36 and retains a light bulb 40, of the Watts reflector type, in a downwardly extending position centrally of the housing 36. Spaced immediately below the light bulb 40 is a slide bracket '42 adapted to receive a slide 43. In the present case, the slide defines a cross-shaped slit 41. Located axially opposite the slide 43 from the light bulb 40 is a single element, short focal length, positive lens 4. When the light bulb 40 is lit, the light rays therefrom which pass through the slit 41 form a cross-shaped image 46 which is projected by the lens 44 to the top surface of the table 10.

When it is required to stack a plurality of plies of cloth for cutting a desired pattern, a first ply 48 which includes a design, for instance, a plaid design, is located on the friction surface 11 of the 'table 10 directly below the projectors 32. The light bulbs 40 in the projectors 32 are then lit, and the guide mark images 46 which are projected from the projectors 32 are adjusted to coincide with selected reference points found on the design of the first ply of cloth 48. The projectors are adjusted by sliding them laterally on the beams 26 and 28 and by moving the traveling beam 28 and forth. When the reference points have been selected and the projectors have been adjusted so as to project the guide mark images 46 on the reference points of the ply of cloth 48, the locking screws 30 are tightened, and a second ply of cloth 48a is placed over the first ply of cloth 48 under the projectors 32 so that identical reference points in the design on the ply of cloth 48a coincide with the guide mark images 46.

The operator then presses down with both palms of his hands on the second ply of cloth 48a, thus flattening the ply so that a certain amount of adherence inherent in the fabric is present which results in a friction similar to the high friction between the first ply of cloth 48 and the friction surface 11. After these steps have been repeated and the required number of plies has been obtained (up to 300 or more plies mainly for big patterns, and to about 150 plies for small ones, as collars, etc.), pins 52 can be pushed through the bottom of the plies, through the holes 12, and locked thereto with a cork 54. A stacked bundle can then be removed from the table and placed on the cutting table 55. It has been found, in practice, that when the fabric used is fairly rough, the stacks do not have to be bundled with the pins 52 and the cork 54. However, when smooth, slippery fabrics, such as silk or terylene are used, then it is preferable to use the pins and cork to remove the stacks from the table 10.

Once the bundle is placed on the cutting table 55, the electric cutting knife, which is indicated at 56, is used to cut the desired pattern. For small patterns, like collars, cuffs, etc., it was found quite simpler and more precise to cut a stack with a hand knife using a hard pattern (usually of Masonite) as a guide. Pressing with one hand on the pattern and cutting wtih the hand knife with the other hand, provided ply heights are not exceeding 100 plies.

It is to be noted, as well, that material used to construct this apparatus need not be necessarily of timber, as rough sketches would suggest, if aluminum tubes or beams could be used to provide better smoother performance.

The present embodiment has been illustrated as including the combined table and projector frame. However, it has been anticipated to provide a frame mounting the projectors, which can be moved up to a standard working table or cutting table. It has also been shown in the drawings that beam 26 is fixed to the rails 22. However, it is obvious that these beams can be mounted in any conventional manner and that they can both be movable or both be fixed.

I claim:

1. A method for stacking plies of cloth having similar designs so that the designs will match in a predetermined pattern area, comprising applying a first ply of cloth bearing a design on a surface, selecting reference points on the design of said ply of cloth, projecting guide mark images on said reference points, superimposing a second ply of cloth having a similar design over the first ply of cloth and adjusting the second ply of cloth so that similar reference points on its design will coincide with the projected guide mark images, and repeating this step until the required amount of plies has been stacked.

2. A method as defined in claim 1 wherein the stacked plies are then cut in accordance with a predetermined pattern.

3. A method as defined in claim 1 wherein the reference points on the design are selected at random and the projected guide mark images are adjustably arranged to project on said selected reference points.

4. A method as defined in claim 1, wherein the surface on which the first ply of cloth is applied is a friction surface, and the first ply of cloth is flattened to make it adhere to said surface.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,957,682 5/1934 Turner 8329 FRANK T. YOST, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 83520, 522, 648

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1957682 *Jun 29, 1933May 8, 1934Turner Marris RMethod of and material for manufacturing apparel
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3880029 *Jun 19, 1974Apr 29, 1975Ppg Industries IncMethod for ganged scoring of glass
US4532839 *Dec 21, 1983Aug 6, 1985Tektronix, Inc.Method for simultaneously cutting a plurality of circuit boards
US4885967 *Aug 25, 1988Dec 12, 1989J. Gibson Mcilvain CompanyLaser alignment device for sawmills
US5996460 *Aug 18, 1997Dec 7, 1999Waite; Lance H.Cut line indicator for power cutting material
US6116128 *Apr 15, 1998Sep 12, 2000Eastman Kodak CompanyMethod for producing a rounded corner at each corner of a pile of sheets
US6397717 *Nov 24, 1999Jun 4, 2002Lance H. WaiteCut line indicator for power cutting material
US6481322 *Jan 13, 2000Nov 19, 2002Limate CorporationSawing apparatus combined with marking device
US6578459Jun 3, 2002Jun 17, 2003Lance WaiteMethod for power saw having cut line indicator
US7398719Jun 17, 2005Jul 15, 2008Eastway Fair Company LimitedMiter saw having a light beam alignment system
US7926398Jan 11, 2005Apr 19, 2011Black & Decker Inc.Cutter with optical alignment system
US20030233921 *Jun 19, 2002Dec 25, 2003Garcia Jaime E.Cutter with optical alignment system
US20050126356 *Jan 11, 2005Jun 16, 2005Delta International Machinery Corp.Cutter with optical alignment system
US20050217445 *Jun 17, 2005Oct 6, 2005One World Technologies LimitedMiter saw having a light beam alignment system
EP0239665A2 *Aug 1, 1986Oct 7, 1987Investronica S.A.Matching method and device for automatic cutting of patterned fabrics
EP0239665A3 *Aug 1, 1986Aug 16, 1989Investronica S.A.Matching method and device for automatic cutting of patterned fabrics
EP1157793A1 *May 26, 2000Nov 28, 2001Thea FelberApparatus and method for adjusting a marker to the surface of a material
Classifications
U.S. Classification83/29, 83/522.15, 83/520, 83/648
International ClassificationA41H43/02, A41H43/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41H43/00, A41H43/0271
European ClassificationA41H43/02R, A41H43/00