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Publication numberUS3496974 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 24, 1970
Filing dateJun 21, 1967
Priority dateJun 21, 1967
Publication numberUS 3496974 A, US 3496974A, US-A-3496974, US3496974 A, US3496974A
InventorsMunsil Willett C, Silvey Robert L
Original AssigneeSilvey Robert L, Munsil Willett C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for constructing carpentry frames
US 3496974 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 24, 1970 w. c. MUNSIL ETAL 3,496,974

METHOD FOR CONSTRUCTING CARPENTRY FRAMES Filed June 21, 1967 &2 Y/

INVENTORS WILLETT C. MUNSIL ROBERT L. SILVEY BY W Q/M- ATTORNEYS United States Patent Office 3,496,974 Patented Feb. 24, 1970 FRAME Willett C. Munsil, 3331 N. th Ave. 85013, and Robert 85021, both of L. Silvey, 126 W. Northview Ave. Phoenix, Ariz.

Filed June 21, 1967, Ser. No. 647,716 Int. Cl. B27m 3/08 U.S. Cl. 144-318 3 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A method of constructing a carpentry frame having a flush face. The frame consists of a plurality of horizontal stiles and vertical stiles affixed in an end-to-edge relationship. The method includes the steps of drilling an inclined hole extending from the back face to the end of a first stile; placing the first stile and a second stile, finished face down, on a flat surface; abutting the stiles such that the drilled end of the first stile abuts the edge of the second'stile; clamping the stiles against the flat surface; and inserting a screw through the drilled hole and engaging the second stile.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to carpentry.

More particularly, the invention concerns a method of constructing a carpentry frame.

In a further aspect, the invention concerns a method of constructing a carpentry frame comprising a plurality of substantially horizontal stiles and a plurality of substantially vertical stiles, in which the stiles are afiixed in an end-to-edge relationship.

In a still further aspect, the invention concerns a method of constructing a carpentry frame of the above type particularly adapted for assembly line technique and insuring that each frame has a flush face surface.

A routine carpentry exercise is the construction of frames having a plurality of horizontal rails and a plurality of vertical stiles, in which the stiles are afiixed in an end-to-edge relationship. (For convenience herein, the term stiles will be used to mean either vertical or horizontal members.) This type of frame is utilized extensively in cabinet making where the frame is commonly referred to as a face frame. Face frames, according to the prior art, are conventionally assembled with dowels, mortise and tenon, half lap joints, or cleats. An essential requisite of a face frame is the flush face surface. The above assembly methods result in a flush face surface only under ideal conditions, usually individually hand fitted joints which requires an exacting layout. Hastily assembled joint-s usually result in poor surface alignment. This disparity is further aggravated by the frequently varying thickness of the stiles. One or several passes through a sander is then required to obtain the desired flush surface face.

A preponderance of present day carpentry is accomplished by mass production or an adaptation or assembly line technique. For example, it is common practice for a contractor to build a quantity of similar homes having prefabricated walls, roof sections, and cabinets. The effectiveness, savings in time and cost, of preassembled modular units is further enhanced if the cabinetwork face frames are constructed of prefinished materials. However, prefinished materials must be properly aligned during assembly to produce a flush outer face surface.

It would be highly advantageous therefore, to provide an expeditious method of constructing a cabinetry frame having flush surface alignment of the frame parts.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is a principal object of the present invention, to provide an improved method of constructing a carpentry frame having a plurality of substantially horizontal stiles and a plurality of substantially vertical stiles affixed in an end-to-edge relationship.

Another object of the invention is to provide a method of constructing a carpentry frame wherein the assembled frame has a flush face surface regardless of the thickness of the individual stiles.

Still another object of the invention is the provision of a method for constructing a carpentry frame of the above type in which the stiles may be prefinished.

Yet still another object of the invention is the provision of a carpentry frame construction method which is rapid and accurate and requires comparatively few processing operations and minimum equipment.

Briefly, to accomplish the desired objectives of my improved method of constructing a cabinetry frame in which the stiles are afiixed in an end-to-edge relationship and having a flush face surface, I first cut the stiles to length. The stiles to be secured by their ends are then drilled with an inclined hole, the inclined hole extending from the face to the end of the stile. The stiles are then placed, face down, on a fiat surface such that the drilled end of one stile abuts against the edge of a second stile. The stiles are now clamped against the flat surface and a screw is inserted through the drilled hole and engages the second stile.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Further and more specific objects and advantages of the present invention will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description thereof taken in conjunction with the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a partial perspective view of a cabinet face frame constructed in accordance with the method of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an elevational view, partly in section, illustrating the preparation of the end affixed stile;

FIG. 3 is a partial perspective view of one joint of tltie frame of FIG. 1 during an intermediate assembly S P;

FIG. 4 is an elevational view, in section, taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 3 and specifically illustrating the final assembly of the stiles; and

FIG. 5 is a partial perspective view of the frame of FIG. 1 during assembly and showing a preferred method for obtaining proper spacing between parallel stiles.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Turning now to the drawings, in which the same reference numerals indicate corresponding elements throughout the various figures, FIG. 1 illustrates a face frame constructed in accordance with the presently preferred method of the invention and shows the horizontal stiles 10 and 10a and the vertical stiles 11 and 11a affixed in an end-to-edge relationship. The frame herein illustrated is shown back face up as characteristic positioning during the entire construction method.

FIG. 2 illustrates the preparation of an end abutted stile, as for example, the vertical stile 11. A combination drill and counterbore 12 enters the back face 13 of the stile 11 at a shallow angle of approximately 15 to 20 degrees. The counterbored hole 17, thus drilled, extends through the stile 11 from the back face 13 through the end 18.

FIG. 3 illustrates the end 18 of the stile 11 abutted against the edge 19 of the stile 10 during assembly. The

stiles are positioned on a flat surface or easel 20 to insure flush face surface alignment and clamped with a self-aligning swivel pad 21 to compensate for possible thickness variation between the stiles 10 and 11. It will be readily understood by those skilled in the art that a plurality of self-aligning swivel pads 21 may be carried by a mechanical or hydraulic arrangement to be selectively positioned over the easel 20.

FIG. 4 illustrates the final assembly of the components of FIG. 3. Specifically noted in this view is the relative difference between the stiles 10 and 11 and the compensating action of the self-aligning swivel pad 21. After the stiles have been clamped a screwdriver 22, either hand or power driven, is used to insert a screw 23 through the counterboredhole 17 to engage the stile 10.

FIG. 5 shows the use of a gauge block 27, a drop-in removable wooden spacer, to position the stile a along the stile 11 relative to the stile 10.

It is apparent that the stiles herein illustrated in the foregoing detailed description of the presently preferred embodiment of the invention may have been variously processed. In the simplest form the stiles are only cut to length from appropriate sized lumber. In a more sophisticated application, the stiles may have been cut to width and length from a sheet of plywood or other construction material having a pre-laminated facing of veneer or plastic.

Having fully described the invention in such manner as to enable those skilled in the art to understand and practice the same, we claim:

1. A method of constructing a carpentry frame having a flush face surface, which frame includes a plurality of stiles disposed substantially horizontally in situ and a plurality of stiles disposed substantially vertical in situ, said stiles affixed in end-to-edge relationship, which method includes the steps of:

(a) cutting said stiles to length;

. 4 (b) drilling an inclined hole through a first one of said stiles, said inclined hole extending from one face to an end of said stile;

(c) sinking a counterbore into the face end of said inclined hole;

(d) placing said stiles on a fiat surface;

(e) arranging said first stile and a second stile such that the drilled end of said first stile abuts the edge of said second stile;

(f) clamping said stiles against said flat surface; and

(g) inserting a screw through said drilled hole and engaging said second stile.

2. The method of claim 1 in which said stiles are cut to width and length from a sheet of material having a prefinished face and an unfinished face and in which:

(a) said hole is drilled from said unfinished face to said end of said first stile; and

(b) said finished face is placed against said fiat surface.

3. The method of claim 1 including the additional step of positioning a gauge block parallel to said second stile and abutting said first stile to space a third stile.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,045,223 11/1912 Uhlinger 52-584 2,394,147 2/1946 Brunton et a1. 52-582 2,982,321 5/1961 Hancock 144310 3,057,384 10/1962 Patterson et a1. 144318 FOREIGN PATENTS 858,534 11/ 1940 France.

GERALD DOST, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1045223 *Sep 9, 1910Nov 26, 1912Western Refrigerator & Mfg CoWall-section and connection.
US2394147 *Apr 22, 1944Feb 5, 1946Bernard BruntonPanel or unit for buildings and buildings constructed therefrom
US2982321 *Aug 7, 1959May 2, 1961Stanley HancockDoor straightening clamp
US3057384 *Jan 19, 1961Oct 9, 1962John F Long Properties IncJig for prefabricating gables
FR858534A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4603719 *Oct 4, 1985Aug 5, 1986Durney Max WDrilling and counterboring apparatus and method for toe fastening
US4944627 *Nov 17, 1988Jul 31, 1990Durney/AlexanderApparatus and method for joining workpieces
US5553645 *Mar 10, 1995Sep 10, 1996Castle Tool Machinery, IncorporatedDrilling and counterboring apparatus and method for forming screw pockets
US6955508 *Nov 26, 2002Oct 18, 2005Radcliffe Gregory PApparatus and method for separately boring precisely aligned opposing screw holes in individual frame members to be joined at a miter joint
US7044460Apr 15, 2003May 16, 2006Carl William BoltonConcealed fastener, system, and associated methods
US7165300Aug 1, 2005Jan 23, 2007Black & Decker Inc.Portable pocket cutter
US7967534May 22, 2007Jun 28, 2011Black & Decker Inc.Pocket hole jig tool system
US8430141Apr 12, 2010Apr 30, 2013Mark D. GarnettWoodworking fixture
US20060032035 *Aug 1, 2005Feb 16, 2006Alan PhillipsPortable pocket cutter
DE4127679C2 *Aug 21, 1991Nov 4, 1999Max W DurneyVorrichtung zur Ausbildung eines taschenförmigen Zapfenlochs mit Bohrungen
WO2003089186A1 *Apr 15, 2003Oct 30, 2003Carl William BoltonConcealed fastener, system, and associated methods
Classifications
U.S. Classification144/365, 29/525.12, 403/7, 52/745.19, 144/353, 29/432
International ClassificationF16B12/00, F16B12/46
Cooperative ClassificationF16B12/46
European ClassificationF16B12/46