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Publication numberUS3499679 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 10, 1970
Filing dateJan 17, 1968
Priority dateJan 17, 1968
Publication numberUS 3499679 A, US 3499679A, US-A-3499679, US3499679 A, US3499679A
InventorsOlander Kemuel B
Original AssigneeOlander Kemuel B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Glare shield attachment for vehicle sun visors
US 3499679 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

-Mar h 10,1919 K, B. OL NDER 4 3,499,679

7 GLARE SHIELD ATTACHMENT FOR VEHICLE SUN VISOBS Filed Jan. 17, 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 E5) Fa-('28 9 I INVENTOR. FILE?! 5 [(EMl/EL z. ozmwrz @ZM 7M 4rrom/zrs March 10, 1970 n a. OLANDER GIJARE SHIELD ATTACHMENT FOR VEHICLE SUN VISORS 2 Sheets-S1199; 2

Filed Jan. 17, 1968 United States Patent GLARE SHIELD ATTACHMENT FOR VEHICLE SUN VISORS Kemuel B. Olander, 301 Parkview Terrace, Minneapolis, Minn. 55416 Filed Jan. 17, 1968, Ser. No. 698,509 Int. Cl. B60j 3/02 US. Cl. 29697 6 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates generally to glare shields as used I in vehicle passenger compartments to shield the rays of the sun, oncoming headlights and the like from the eyes of the driver or front seat passenger. It more particularly concerns such glare shields as are attached to a conventional automobile sun visor and are readily adjustable through various paths of movement to the desired position.

Virtually all automotive vehicles of present day manufacture are provided, at least in front of the drivers position, with a sun visor which can be adjusted about a transverse horizontal axis between a lowered position and a raised or stored position. Frequently such visors are also pivoted near one end to the vehicle roof for swinging movement about a vertical axis. While such a visor is generally adequate for shielding the driver's eyes from the sun in relatively high positions, it cannot be adjusted to block or diffuse rays from the sun or oncoming headlights entering through the lower area of the vehicle windshield, nor would it be practical nor safe to do so since automobile visors are commonly not translucent or transparent and such adjustment would dangerously block the drivers field of vision.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a glare shield of the proper tinting to effectively modify the blinding glare but which still allows visibility in the field of vision inscribed by the glare shield and having means for attachment to a vehicle sun visor which can be readily adjusted to cover virtually any selected area between the users eyes and the vehicle windshield.

Another and more specific object of the invention is to provide a glare shield which can be adjusted along three different pathways and locked at any selected position on each with a single control for unlocking the shield for movement along all pathways.

The above and additional objects of the invention will be brought to light during the course of the following specification, reference being made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view looking forwardly toward the windshield of an automobile and showing the glare shield mounted on the drivers windshield visor and depending therefrom in a position to shield the glare of oncoming headlights. The storage position of the shield is shown in broken lines.

FIG. 2 is an elevation view of the visor mounted shield with one position shown in full lines and another in broken lines.

ice

FIG. 3 is a horizontal section taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 2 and looking downwardly.

FIG. 4 is a vertical section taken on line 4-4 of FIG. 2 and showing the shield in end elevation. An alternate position of the shield is shown in broken lines.

FIG. 5 is a section taken on line 55 of FIG. 2 through the glare shield pivot.

FIGS. 6 and 7 are sections taken on line 6-6 and 77 of FIG. 5 and looking in opposite directions.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings reference characters will be used to denote like parts or structural features in the different views. In FIG. 1 there is shown the forward portion of a conventional automobile or truck drivers compartment with a roof 10, a windshield 11, steering wheel 12, and rear view mirror 14. The numeral 15 denotes a sun visor mounted on a rod 16 which has one end supported by bracket 17 attached to the roof 10. It will be understood that the visor 15 is adjustable about the axis of rod 16 between forwardly and rearwardly extending positions and various positions of adjustment depending downwardly from rod 16. Also rod 16 may be swingable in bracket 17 for movement of the visor 15 toward the side window '18 of the drivers cornpartment. This is all conventional vehicle sun visor construction.

The glare shield denoted generally at 20 is made up of four major components, namely, a mounting bar 21, a clamp bracket 22, the shield itself 24, and a control mechanism 25. The mounting bar 21 consists of a straight length metal rod or tube 26 having its ends connected to aligned spring clips 27 as by L-shaped olfset members 28 so that the rod 26 is offset from the plane of visor 15 when the clips are attached thereto, as best seen in FIG. 4. Screw and nut assemblies 29 connect members 28 to the bight portions of the clips 27 so that the compressive gripping force of the clips might be adjusted.

The clamp bracket 22 comprises a pair of hinge plates 30 and 31 interconnected near their upper edges by a hinge pin 32 for relative opening and closing movement. Immediately below the hinge pin, as the bracket is viewed in FIGS. 4 and 5, plates 30 and 31 are respectively. provided with complementary recesses 34 and 35 which joint 1y receive rod 26. It will be observed that the plates 30 and 31 do not meet below the rod 26, thus providing the space at 36 allowing selective tightening or releasing of the clamping action of the plates on the rod.

The bottom edges of the hinge plates 30 and 31 are.

rounded on a common axis (FIG. 6) and the plates are respectively provided with apertures 37 and 38 on said axis, with the adjacent ends of said apertures being enlarged as at 39. The outer or front face of plate 31 is formed with multiple serrations extending radially from the aperture 38 to form a face 40 for a friction clutch which will shortly be more fully explained.

The glare shield 24 is preferably a molded sheet 42 of transparent material which is tinted to screen or diffuse bright light rays. Near one end of sheet 42 a disk 44 is molded therein having a diameter equal to face 40. and the outer face 45 of disk 44 is provided with multiple radial serrations extending from an aperture 46 in sheet 42 and adapted to mate and rotationally interlock with the face 40.

The control mechanism 25 includes a mounting strip 48 riveted to the sheet 42 as at 49 and 50 and a fixed plate spring 51 also secured at 49 and diverging from strip 48. Spring 51 is held in a stressed position by a bolt 52 which extends through apertures in the spring and strip 48 as well as apertures 46, 38, and 37 and held by nut 54. A spiral spring 55 encircles the bolt 52 between the seats 39 to yieldably urge hinge plates 30 and 31 in a separating direction. Spring 51 thus serves as a control device for unlocking the shield 24 to selectively move it between various positions.

It will be understood that the glare shield may be used to supplement the shielding effect of the visor or may be used with the visor 15 in raised position. In either event the rod 26 will be disposed in substantially horizontal position being secured by clips 27 to extend along one longitudinal edge of the visor.

The shield is movable along three different pathways relative to its mounting bar 21 and visor 15. First it can be moved along rod 26 by sliding the clamp 22 therealong (FIG. 2). Secondly, it can be rotated about the axis of the rod, again with clamp 22 moving relative to the rod (FIG. 4). Finally, the shield can be moved about the axis of bolt 52 (FIG. 1).

It will also be understood that the single control mechanism 25 will lock the shield 24 against movement in any of the above mentioned directions. With the clamp 22 held tightly against rod 26 by the bolt 52 which is spring tensioned by spring 51, the shield cannot be moved along or around the rod. By the same manner bolt 52 holds the shield firmly against hinge plate 31 with the serrated faces 40 and 45 in mesh prohibiting rotary movement of the shield about the axis of bolt 52.

By squeezing the sheet and spring 51 together between the thumb and fingers the shield becomes completely unlocked for movement along any of the three pathways of movement. With the bias of spring 51 removed from bolt 52, the spring 55 will spread the hinge plates and 31 sufliciently to allow movement of the clamp 22 along or around rod 26. This also releases the compressive force holding faces and in firm engagement to allow rotary slippage of these faces and resultant adjustment of the shield 24 about the axis of bolt 52.

Obviously, with possible movement of the shield on three different pathways relative to the rod 26 and with further possible adjustment of visor 15 about two different axes, there are innumerable different positions into.

which the glare shield may be adjusted. Two positions where the shield is found to be particularly useful are shown in full lines in FIG. 1, to dim the bright lights of oncoming cars and in FIG. 2 to shield a low sun.

Of primary importance is the fact that the driver can quickly and easily adjust the shield to any desired position by merely depressing the control member 51. The tension on control mechanism 25 may be varied by adjustment of the nut 54 on bolt 52.

Having now therefore fully illustrated and described my invention, what I claim to be new and desire to protect,'by Letters Patent is:

1. In a glare shield for attachment to the sun visor of an automobile,

(a) a straight rod which is round in cross section,

(b) means at each end of the rod for removably attaching the rod to a.horizontal edge of the visor with the rod disposed on a substantially horizontal plane,

(c) a bracket mounted on the rod for movement therealong or about the axis of the rod,

(d) first means releasably locking the bracket on the rod against such movement,

(e) a glare shield pivoted to the bracket for movement about an axis perpendicular to the rod,

(f) second means releasably locking the shield against movement about the latter axis,

(g) a single spring tensioned control means for instantly releasing both of said locking means to allow concurrent movement of the shield on or about the rod axis or the pivot axis.

2. In a glare shield for attachment to the sun visor of an automobile,

(a) a straight rod which is round in cross section,

02) m a s at sash end of the e fo reme b y a taching the rod to a horizontal edge of the visor with the rod disposed on a substantially horizontal plane,

(c) a bracket mounted on the rod for movement therealong or about the axis of the rod,

(d) first means releasably locking the bracket on the rod against such movement,

(e) a glare shield pivoted to the bracket for movement about an axis perpendicular to the rod,

(f) second means releasably locking the shield against movement about the latter axis,

(g) a single control means for releasing both of said locking means to allow concurrent movement of the shield on or about the rod axis or the pivot axis,

(h) said bracket comprising a pair of clamp halves having complementary recesses for jointly receiving the rod,

(i) spring means biasing the clamp halves toward each other, and

(j) said control means adapted to overcome said spring means.

3. The subject matter of claim 2 wherein a second spring means is interposed between the clamp halves to urge them in a separating direction when the control means has been operated to overcome said first mentioned spring means.

4. In a glare shield for attachment to the sun visor of an automobile,

(a) a straight rod which is round in cross section,

(b) means at each end of the rod for removably attaching the rod to a horizontal edge of the visor with the rod disposed on a substantially horizontal plane,

(c) a bracket mounted on the rod for movement therealong or about the axis of the rod,

(d) first means releasably locking the bracket on the rod against such movement,

(e) a glare shield pivoted to the bracket for movement about an axis perpendicular to the rod,

(f) second means releasably locking the shield against movement about the latter axis,

(g) a single control means for releasing both of said locking means to allow concurrent movement of the shield on or about the rod axis or the pivot axis,

(h) said second means including interlocking serrations on the glare shield and bracket extending radially from their interpivot, and

(i) spring means acting upon the bracket and shield to yieldably hold the serrations in interlocking engagement.

5. In a glare shield for mounting in an automobile compartment, an elongated cross-sectionally circular rod adapted to be mounted on a portion of the compartment to extend horizontally in front of the drivers position, a shield, means mounting the shield on the rod for selective movement of the shield in first, second and third separate planes, said mounting means including a bracket slidably journaled on the rod for movement therealong on said first plane and about the axis thereof on said second plane, and also including a pivotal connection between the shield and bracket for movement of the shield about a pivot axis perpendicular to said rod on said third plane, and a control mechanism connecting the bracket and shield for releasably locking the shield against or free it for movement in any of said planes, said control mechanism having a single manual control for releasing the shield for movement in any of said planes, and spring means yieldably retaining the control in shield locking position.

6. The subject matter of claim 5 wherein said bracket comprises a pair of facing clamp halves engaging against opposite sides of the rod, the shield engaging against the outside of one of the clamp halves, a bolt extending through said halves and the shield, said spring means acting between the bolt and shield to yieldably hold said halves and shield together, and said one clamp half and shield having intermeshing teeth projecting radially from the bolt axis to interlock said half and shield against relative rotary movement about said bolt axis.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 6 5/1968 Stamp 29697 LEO FRIAGLIA, Primary Examiner JOHN A. PEKAR, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3126191 *Jan 19, 1960Mar 24, 1964 holden
US3158396 *Jul 26, 1963Nov 24, 1964Hans BergerGlare shield attachment for automotive vehicles
US3336073 *Aug 16, 1965Aug 15, 1967Hans BergerGlare shield for automobile visors
US3383132 *Nov 24, 1965May 14, 1968Floyd R. StampVehicle windshield sun visor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3695658 *Nov 9, 1970Oct 3, 1972Vacha FredGlare shield
US3988033 *Sep 8, 1975Oct 26, 1976Vacha Fred PGlare shield
US4003597 *Aug 25, 1975Jan 18, 1977Jerry Doyal AcuffVehicle sun blindness eliminator
US4681363 *Nov 7, 1985Jul 21, 1987Prince CorporationVisor system
US4690450 *Nov 2, 1984Sep 1, 1987Prince CorporationVisor system
US4762359 *Mar 5, 1987Aug 9, 1988Prince CorporationVisor system
US4783111 *May 23, 1986Nov 8, 1988Prince CorporationVisor
US4818011 *May 13, 1987Apr 4, 1989Gabe CherianAnti-glare visor system
US4858982 *Feb 25, 1988Aug 22, 1989Prince CorporationVisor
US4925232 *Jun 6, 1988May 15, 1990Prince CorporationVisor
US4976486 *Apr 20, 1990Dec 11, 1990Rifaat Mahassen SSun visor
US4989910 *Jan 31, 1990Feb 5, 1991Prince CorporationPivoted slide-out visor panel
US5015027 *Apr 30, 1990May 14, 1991Rifaat Mahassen SSun visor
US5080420 *Feb 1, 1990Jan 14, 1992Prince CorporationVisor
US5390973 *Aug 2, 1993Feb 21, 1995United Technologies Automotive, Inc.Side window sun visor assembly
US5417466 *Nov 4, 1993May 23, 1995United Technologies Automotive, Inc.Sun visor system
US5951091 *May 19, 1998Sep 14, 1999Prince CorporationAdjustable visor
US8403430Feb 7, 2011Mar 26, 2013Brass Smith, LlcAdjustable food shield
US8585160Mar 22, 2013Nov 19, 2013Brass Smith, LLC (BSI Designs)Adjustable food shield
US8936223May 3, 2012Jan 20, 2015Andrew H. McGrathAdjustable bracket assembly
US20050218689 *Mar 4, 2005Oct 6, 2005Edmonds Rodney L SrAnti-Glare Sunshade Combo\Dual Visor
US20110001332 *Jul 6, 2010Jan 6, 2011James WeberShade panel assembly for all vehicles
US20110169384 *Jan 13, 2010Jul 14, 2011Brass Smith, LLC (Subsidiary of Kevry Corp.)Food shield
EP0223522A2Nov 7, 1986May 27, 1987Prince CorporationVisor system
EP0246930A2 *May 26, 1987Nov 25, 1987Prince CorporationVisor system
EP0400552A1 *May 28, 1990Dec 5, 1990Sipi Societa Internazionale Progetti E InnovazioniDevice suitable for auxiliary sunvisors of motor-vehicles, for improving the protection capability
WO1986002322A1 *May 14, 1985Apr 24, 1986Einar LarsenAuxiliary sun visor for a motorvehicle
WO1990005071A1 *Nov 10, 1988May 17, 1990Gabe CherianAnti-glare visor system
Classifications
U.S. Classification296/97.6, 248/286.1
International ClassificationB60J3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB60J3/0208
European ClassificationB60J3/02B1