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Publication numberUS3500600 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 17, 1970
Filing dateMar 19, 1968
Priority dateMar 19, 1968
Publication numberUS 3500600 A, US 3500600A, US-A-3500600, US3500600 A, US3500600A
InventorsBagley Obie E Sr
Original AssigneeBagley Obie E Sr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Trim for shiplap siding
US 3500600 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 17, 1970 o. E. BAGLEY, SR

TRIM FOR SHIPLAP SIDING 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 19, 1968 Fig.3

v E m @w b V. 0 B

March 17, 1970 o. E. BAGLEY, SR 3,500,600

TRIM FOR SHIPLAP SIDING Filed March 19, 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Obie- E. Bag/2y, 5r.

INVENTOK BY 0 40m United States Patent 3,500,600 TRIM FOR SHIPLAP SIDING Obie E. Bagley, Sr., Rte. 2, Box 75, Rock Hill, S.C. 29730 Filed Mar. 19, 1968, Ser. No. 714,175 Int. Cl. E06b 1/12; E04f 19/02 US. Cl. 52-211 4 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Various types of siding materials have been provided for covering the exterior of a building. One type of siding which has been extensively installed is shiplap siding constructed of aluminum or other metallic materials or non-metallic materials. Such siding material quite frequently is placed over existing siding on a building to enhance the appearance characteristics of the building and also to enhance the weatherproofing characteristics, insulation characteristics and the like. Such siding, in some instances, includes a layer of insulation material on the inner surface thereof and when installing the siding, it is necessary to measure the distance between framing members, corners and the like in order to have the siding fit properly. There have been provided corner members to be associated with aluminum siding or the like which is attached to the existing wall of the building and receives the ends of the siding panel. However, due to the fact that existing buildings quite frequently are not square, it is rather difficult to lit the siding properly without measuring each individual piece. Further, due to expansion and contraction of the siding and the installation with the ends of the siding engaging the framing members, the siding quite frequently will be buckled or bent or otherwise damaged and will also produce substantial noise during the expansion and contraction.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a trim arrangement for shiplap siding which overlaps and engages the outer surface of the siding adjacent the end thereof to enable the ends of the siding to be spaced from the framing members to allow expansion and contraction without buckling, bending or the like and to provide a finished appearance to the siding by virtue of the trim having a shape in configuration closely approaching the exterior shape and configuration of the siding.

Another object of the present invention is to provide trim in accordance with the preceding object for use in association with a window frame and siding material in which the window frame may be either completely enclosed or left exposed.

A further object of the present invention is to provide trim in accordance with the preceding objects including a corner member to extend around a corner of a building and be associated with a siding panel on two sides of the building.

Still another feature of the present invention is the provision of trim for shiplap siding which is simple in construction, easy to assembly, long lasting and relatively inexpensive in construction and installation.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the ac companying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of a portion of a building with siding material and the trim of the present invention installed thereon;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged fragmental perspective view of a corner portion of the building illustrating the relationship of the trim to the siding and corner member;

FIGURE 3 is a transverse, sectional view taken substantially upon a plane passing along section line 3-3 of FIGURE 2 illustrating further structural details of this construction;

FIGURE 4 is a fragmental, enlarged partial perspective view of a window frame employing a trim member in accordance with this invention;

FIGURE 5 is a transverse, sectional view taken substantially upon a plane passing along section line 5-5 of FIGURE 4 illustrating further structural details thereof;

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view, with portions broken away, illustrating another type of trim associated with the window frame and siding; and

FIGURE 7 is a transverse, sectional view taken substantially upon a plane passing along section line 7-7 of FIGURE 6 illustrating further structural details thereof.

Referring now specifically to the drawings, a building such as a dwelling house or the like is generally designated by the numeral 10 and is provided with siding material such as aluminum shiplap siding panels 12 or the like which are in and of themselves conventional in construction and provided with a layer of insulating material 14 such as foam plastic or the like bonded to the inner surface thereof. The siding panels 12 includes an attaching flange 16 along the upper edge thereof for receiving nails or equivalent fasteners 18 for securing the siding panels 12 to an underlying sheathing 20 which may be an existing exterior wall of the building or the like. Also, an outwardly projecting and downwardly inclined hook-like flange 22 is provided adjacent the attaching flange 16 for receiving the inturned hooklike lower edge 24 on the siding panels 12 all of which represents conventional construction and installation.

At the corner of a building, a corner framing member generally designated by the numeral 26 is provided which includes outer corner panels 28 and 30 oriented in right angular relation to each other with the outer edge of the panel 28 being reversely curved or bent as at 32 and the outer edge of the panel 30 being similarly reversely bent as at 34. Extending inwardly from the reversely curved portion 32 and 34 is a panel 36 inte gral with the panel 28 and reversely curved edge 32 and a panel 38 integral with the panel 30 and reversely curved edge 34 in which the panels 28, 30, 36 and 38 define substantially a hollow vertical framing member. Extending outwardly from the edge of the panel 36 is an attaching flange 40 and extending out from the panel 38 is an attaching flange 42 with the attaching flanges 40 and 42 being perpendicular to each other for engagement with adjacent surfaces of the corner of the sheathing or building wall 20 as illustrated in FIGURE 3 and secured thereto by suitable fastening devices such as nails or the like 44.

The reversely curved edges 32 and 34 and associated panels 36 and 38 form outwardly facing channels to receive the ends of the siding panels 12. However, when the ends of the siding panels 12 are abutted against the panels 36 and 38, the expansion and contraction of the siding panels 12 causes not only buckling of the side panels 12 but also damage to the corner framing member 26 and also forms considerable noise during the expansion and contraction.

In the present invention, the siding panels 12 are cut so that the ends thereof are spaced from the panels 36 and 38 respectively as illustrated in FIGURE 3. While this eliminates buckling of the panels 12 and eliminates damage to the corner member 26, it leaves an exposed end at the panels 12 and permits water to enter this area and is also unsightly. Accordingly, the trim strip generally designated by the numeral 48 is provided which substantially is L-shaped in configuration or right angular in configuration with flanges 50 and 52 being at right angles to each other with the outside corner 54 thereof engaging the outside corner defined by the panels 28 and 30. The panels 50 and 52 of the trim Strip 48 are disposed alongside of the panels 28 and 30 and are secured to either or both of the panels 28 and 30 by rivets or other suitable fasteners 56. As illustrated in FIG- URE 3, the panels 50 and 52 are substantially longer than the panels 28 and 30 respectively and are of sufficient length to terminate in overlying relation to the ends of the siding panels 12 even though the siding panels 12 may be spaced from the panels 36 and 38. The remote or free ends of the panels 50 and 52 of the trim strip 48 have an inturned flange 56 and 58 respectively formed thereon with the inner edge of the flange 56 and the inner edge of the flange 58 being notched or cut with inclined edge portions 60 which closely fit and conform with the exterior surface of the shiplap siding 12 as illustrated in FIGURE 2. Thus, the inner edge of the flanges 56 and 58 respectively closely engage the shiplap siding 12 to conceal the space between the ends of the siding 12 and the panels 36 and 38 on the corner framing member 26 and also prevent entry of water, snow, ice, insects and the like. Thus, with this construction, contraction and expansion of the panels 12 may be compensated for while retaining the desirable appearance characteristics of the aluminum siding or the like. This also enables the person installing the aluminum siding or the like to more easily install the siding inasmuch as the length of the aluminum siding does not have to be as precisely determined as is necessary were the aluminum siding to abut against either of the panels 36 and 38.

FIGURES 4 and illustrate the structure employed at a window frame which is designated by the numeral 62. In this construction, an L-shaped framing member generally designated by the numeral 64 is employed which includes an attaching flange 66 which is attached to the siding or sheathing by suitable fasteners such as nails 68 and the like with the other flange 70 of the framing member 64 extending perpendicularly outwardly therefrom substantially adjacent the outwardly extending side surface of the window frame 62. The outer edge of the flange 70 is inclined away from the window frame and terminates in a reversely curved edge 72. In this construction, the siding panels 12 are spaced away from the flange 70 to permit expansion and contraction thereof and also to permit a standard length of siding panels to be employed even though the window frame 62 may be oriented in a manner that is not truly vertical.

A trim strip generally designated by the numeral 74 and being generally channel-shape in configuration is provided for bridging the space between the ends of the side panels 12 and the flange 70 on the framing member 64. The trim strip includes an outer panel 76 generally parallel to the sheathing 20 and edge panels 78 and 80 parallel to each other but perpendicular to the panel 76. The panel 78 extends between the flange 70 and the window frame 62 and is secured thereto by a suitable rivet 82 thus permanently affixing the trim strip 74 and the framing member 64. The flange or panel 80 extends inwardly toward and may be in engagement with the panels 12 with the inner edge of the panel or flange being notched as at 84 for close fitting engagement with the exterior surface of the shiplap siding as illustrated in FIGURE 4.

Thus, with this construction, the framing member 60 and the trim strip 74 may be installed against the window frame 62 and even though the window frame may not be plumb or square, the pieces of siding 12 disposed between the window frame 62 and the corner framing member 26 may be cut to a standard length after a single measurement and will be properly positioned thus eliminating the necessity of measuring each individual siding piece in the event either the window frame or the corner frame member is not square or truly vertical.

In this construction, the lower end of the framing member 64 as well as the lower end of the trim strip 74 may terminate flush with the lower edge of the window sill 86 and the upper edge thereof may terminate flush with the top surface of the top frame member 88 or a lintel plate or the like.

FIGURES 6 and 7 illustrate another type of trim strip generally designated by the numeral 90 which is associated with a window frame 92 in the usual manner with the siding 12 attached to the sheathing or existing siding 20 in the same manner as FIGURES 4 and 5 with the end of the siding 12 being spaced from the framing member 92 as illustrated in FIGURE 7.

The trim strip 90 includes a panel 94 of relatively wide construction and of a sufficient length to extend completely across the face of the framing member 92 and into overlapping relation to the end edge portion of the siding 12. One edge of the panel 94 is provided with a laterally inwardly extending flange or panel 96 secured to the interior edge of the frame member 92 by a fastener such as as nail 98 or the like. Similar fasteners or nails 100 secure the panel 94 to the outer surface of the frame member 92. The other edge of the panel 94 is provided with and inwardly extending flange or panel 102 perpendicular thereto having notches or inclined recesses 104 formed therein to conform with and closely engage the exterior surface of the siding 12.

The upper end of the trim strip 90 is provided with an inturned flange 106 which overlies the top plate or top frame member 108 and is engaged with or joined with the flange 102 at the outer edge thereof. The inner flange 96 is, of course, notched to receive the top frame member 108. At the bottom of the trim strip 90, the front panel 94 and the inner flange or panel 96 is notched or recessed at 110 to fit around the window sill 112.

The trim strips are provided with coating such as baked on enamel or the like of the same appearance characteristics as the siding 12 or if desired, contrasting materials may be employed depending upon the desires of the particular homeowner or the like.

With the present invention, the siding panels between the corner framing member and the window frame or door frame may be cut with a single measurement and will fit sufficiently close even though the window frame, door frame or corner frame member, either an inside or an outside corner is not perfectly vertical. The exterior panels of the trim strip having the inwardly extending flange or flanges thereon fitting and conforming with the exterior surface of the siding panels provides a neat appearance while yet retaining freedom of expansion and contraction of the siding panels which incidently is permitted because the nail holes which secure the siding panels to the underlying siding or sheathing are elongated to permit such movement.

Both the top and bottom ends of the trim members 48 and 74 may also be closed by suitable flanges or panels attached thereto in the form of caps which are separated from the trim members or the closure members may be integral therewith.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. In combination with a wooden wall of a building including a framing member projecting outwardly from the surface of the wall and defining an opening therein, siding panels attached to the wall with the terminal ends thereof spaced from the framing member to enable expansion and contraction of the panels relative thereto, a trim panel comprising a panel extending from the framing member to a position overlying the ends of the siding panels, said trim panel having an inwardly extending flange eX- tending toward the siding panels with the inner edge of the flange on the trim panel remote from the flange configuration of the siding panels, but being free thereof to enable expansion and contraction of the siding panels longitudinally in relation to the trim panel and framing member to eliminate buckling of. the siding panels.

2. The structure as defined in claim 1 wherein said trim panel is of one-piece construction and substantially channel-shaped with inturned flanges at each edge thereot, the flange on the trim panel remote from the flange conforming with the siding panels being disposed against the side surface of the framing member remote from the sid ing panels, and the web of the trim panel overlying and being secured to the outer surface of the framing member.

3. The structure as defined in claim 1 wherein said Wall also includes a corner framing member opposed to the opening defining framing member with the siding panels spaced from the corner framing member, a corner trim panel of substantially L-shaped configuration including two panels disposed perpendicular to each other, one of the perpendicular panels being secured on the outer surface of the corner framing member, each of the panels of the L-shaped trim panel having inturned flanges overlying and conforming with the siding panels on opposite sides of the corner framing member with the siding panels being free of the trim panels.

4. The structure as defined in claim 1 wherein said trim panel includes an L-shaped member having one flange secured to the wall adjacent the framing member and a second flange extending alongside the framing member and terminating outwardly beyond the edge of the framing member facing the siding panels, and a channel-shaped member having one flange extending between the framing member and the second flange on the L-shaped member and being secured to said second flange, the other flange of the channel-shaped member overlying and conforming with the siding panels and being free of the siding panels.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,521,938 l/l925 Gartenberg 52278 X 1,959,880 5/1934 Sims 52376 2,667,242 1/1954 Kullmer 52 288 X 2.678.476 5/1954 Carter 52-717 X 3,304,676 2/1967 iSallie et al. 52-276 ALFRED C. PERHAM, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 52-278, 288, 573

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1521938 *Jun 9, 1924Jan 6, 1925Morris GartenbergMetal siding for buildings
US1959880 *Aug 28, 1930May 22, 1934Sims Ernest MMetal building structure
US2667242 *Sep 13, 1949Jan 26, 1954Soule Steel CompanyPrefabricated metal panel joining member
US2678476 *Aug 20, 1946May 18, 1954Carter John ETrim strip for building structures comprising detachable adjustable filler strips
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3631642 *Sep 3, 1969Jan 4, 1972King Mfg CoSelf-mounting siding
US3775917 *Jul 15, 1972Dec 4, 1973Silver Top Mfg Co IncSuspended skirting for below dwelling,
US3906699 *Dec 3, 1974Sep 23, 1975Leddy RobertWater sealing component for installing siding
US4129971 *Apr 29, 1977Dec 19, 1978Republic Steel CorporationEdge cover trim
US4196553 *Jan 16, 1978Apr 8, 1980Veach Clifton REnd joining piece adaptable to either hollow or insulated backing siding
US4389824 *Mar 3, 1980Jun 28, 1983Carl AndersonWindow and door trim for use with siding
US4608800 *Dec 19, 1984Sep 2, 1986Richard FredetteCorner piece for vinyl siding retainers
US4680912 *Mar 28, 1986Jul 21, 1987Antonio PantaloneStructure for metal constructions in general, in particular for trestlework constructions, accomplished by means of section bars and jointing elements
US4726152 *Nov 24, 1986Feb 23, 1988Vagedes Industries, Inc.Bracket for mounting a fixture on a wall
US4766710 *Jun 26, 1987Aug 30, 1988Tompkins Charles AColumn support for drywall panel
US4875318 *May 10, 1988Oct 24, 1989Tapco Products Company, Inc.Plastic building product
US4887195 *Aug 1, 1988Dec 12, 1989Donelan John MIlluminated house number enclosure
US5000409 *Dec 4, 1989Mar 19, 1991Tapco Products Company, Inc.One piece wall mounting bracket
US5275366 *Nov 18, 1992Jan 4, 1994Aluminum Company Of AmericaFixture mounting bracket and associated fixture assembly
US5517794 *Mar 10, 1995May 21, 1996James Michael WagnerApparatus for forming vinyl siding corners extending over walls intersecting at obtuse angles
US5542222 *Dec 14, 1994Aug 6, 1996Abco, Inc.Corner post support member
US5596852 *Jul 20, 1994Jan 28, 1997Mid-America Building Products CorporationPlastic building product
US5664375 *Apr 10, 1996Sep 9, 1997Canplas Industries, Ltd.Exterior building product device
US5664376 *Apr 29, 1996Sep 9, 1997Abco, Inc.Corner post support member
US6029415 *Oct 24, 1997Feb 29, 2000Abco, Inc.Laminated vinyl siding
US6041555 *May 20, 1997Mar 28, 2000Alpi; George M.Integrated corner piece leader
US6195952Feb 9, 2000Mar 6, 2001Abco, Inc.Laminated vinyl siding
US6341458 *Jun 8, 2000Jan 29, 2002Crane Products Ltd.Extruded composite corners for building construction
US6418610 *Mar 22, 2001Jul 16, 2002Pactiv CorporationMethods for using a support backer board system for siding
US6684587Jun 20, 2002Feb 3, 2004Certainteed CorporationCedar impression siding corner
US7219477 *Aug 22, 2003May 22, 2007Leffler Scott TSiding trim
US7510153May 9, 2003Mar 31, 2009Tapco International CorporationSingle piece mounting frame
US7654050May 25, 2004Feb 2, 2010Brett C JusticeCorner trim piece for siding
US8572910Jul 7, 2006Nov 5, 2013Tapco International, Inc.Cap-on-cap mounting block
US20130263541 *Apr 9, 2012Oct 10, 2013Gary L. LedgerwoodVinyl Siding Sealer System
US20140311072 *Apr 21, 2014Oct 23, 2014Ernest R. AndersonSiding Seal
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/58, 52/288.1, 52/278
International ClassificationE04F19/02, E04F19/06
Cooperative ClassificationE04F19/06
European ClassificationE04F19/06