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Publication numberUS3501737 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 17, 1970
Filing dateMay 13, 1968
Priority dateMay 13, 1968
Publication numberUS 3501737 A, US 3501737A, US-A-3501737, US3501737 A, US3501737A
InventorsArthur F Davy, Gerald Harris
Original AssigneeTrim Line Connectors Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Captivated centre conductor connector
US 3501737 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 17, 1970 HARRIS ET AL 3,501,737

CAPTIVATED CENTRE CONDUCTOR CONNECTOR Filed May 15, 1968 INVENTORS GERALD HARRIS ARTHUR FREDERICK DAVY ATTORN EYS United States Patent 3,501,737 CAPTIVATED CENTRE CONDUCTOR CONNECTOR Gerald Harris, Rexdale, Ontario, and Arthur F. Davy,

Weston, Ontario, Canada, assignors to Trim-Line Connectors Ltd., Weston, Ontario, Canada Filed May 13, 1968, Ser. No. 728,657 Int. Cl. H01r 17/18, 13/58 US. Cl. 3 39-177 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates toa connector for electrically connecting the end of a coaxial cable used for communication signal transmission to an electronic device such as an amplifier, receiver, transmitter, control box, junction, etc.

It is practice to connect coaxial cables that carry television and like signals to electronic devices where they connect with a communication circuit by means of connectors that are adapted to be as weather-tight as possible. Provision must be made for connecting both the outer conductor and the centre conductor of the coaxial cable to the circuit. In this connection it is usual to provide a socket to receive the centre conductor, but difiiculty has been encountered in providing a satisfactory means for securing the centre conductor with respect to its socket. This invention provides a simple and positive way for securing the centre conductor of the coaxial cable with respect to the connector so that a positive connection can be made that will not with time pull out or be displaced.

It is therefore an object to provide a simple and effective device for clamping the inner conductor of a coaxial cable with respect to a connector that is adapted to connect the cable to a circuit control box or the like.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a connector that will effectively grip the outer conductor as well as the inner conductor.

With these and other objects in view, a connector for coaxial cable according to this invention has a socket for the centre conductor and comprises a tubular casing adapted to conduct electricity having at least a tubular base and a tubular base cap, the tubular base and the tubular base cap having principal axes aligned and being relatively movable with respect to each other along their aligned principal axes, a tubular cable clamp carried by one of the tubular base and tubular base cap, said tubular base clamp having an outer collar of metal and an inner collar of a resilient electricity insulating material, said outer collar and said inner collar each being radially compressible, said outer collar being formed with a clamping surface at an incline to its principal axes and being adapted to yield to force thereagainst to radially compress the outer and the inner collar, said inner collar being resilient and adapted to re-assert itself upon release of force applied to the outer collar to return the outer and the inner collar to their normal position upon the release of force on said clamping surface of said outer collar, said tubular base and said tubular base cap being adapted to confine said outer collar as they are moved towards each other to exert a force on said clamping surface of said outer collar, said inner collar being adapted to receive and grip said socket for said centre conductor to exert a clamping force thereon that will grip and retain a conductor therein.

The invention will be clearly understood after reference to the following detailed specification read in conjunction with the drawings.

In the drawings,

FIGURE 1 is an exploded view of a connector according to the invention, and

FIGURE 2 is a cross-sectional view of the connector of FIGURE 1.

The connector has a tubular casing, the principal parts of which are the base 10 and the base cap 12. A section 14, which will be referred to later, is adapted to provide a moisture seal around the outside of the cable 16 that is retained thereby.

The clamp is adapted to electrically connect an end of a coaxial cable 1'6 to a circuit in a junction box or the like, and it has a socket contact 18 which is electrically insulated by means of the plastic insulating material 20 from the metallic parts 10, 12 and 14 of the tubular casing. The contact 18 extends through the plastic material 20 and has a yieldable tubular socket 22 concentrically arranged within the base 10 of the casing. Socket 22 is formed with longitudinally extending slits so that it can be compressed to rigidly grip the inner conductor 24 of the coaxial cable 16.

A tubular cable clamp composed of an outer metallic collar 26 and an inner plastic collar 28 of an electricity insulating material is carried by the cooperating sections of the casing 10 and .12 and is adapted upon manipulation of the sections 10 and 12 to grip the yieldable socket 22 to compress it to securely retain therein the inner condoctor 24 in use.

Both the outer metallic collar 26 and the inner plastic collar 28 of the cable clamp are each formed with a split 30 and 32 respectively so that they can be compressed radially to perform their clamping function on the tubular socket 22. It should be noted that the outer collar 26 is made of a metal similar to themetal of the casing, which is in turn made similar to the metal of the outer conductor for the purpose of avoiding corrosion. This metal is commonly aluminum, and aluminum notoriously has little or no resilient properties. The inner collar is made of a plastic material for the purpose of electrically insulating the outer conductor of the cable 16 from the inner conductor and for the purpose of giving resilience to the clamping member. The inner collar, therefore, must have the required di-electric strength and it must also have sufficient resilience to expand the metallic outer conductor when clamping pressure is released therefrom so that the clamping action on the socket 22 is released. Suitable plastic materials for the inner collar are resilient acetals, nylons, phenolics which have electricity insulating characteristics.

In the embodiment of the 'invetnion shown the outer collar 26 of the cable clamp is also adapted to function as a clamping device for the outer conductor 34 of the cable 16; and in this respect it will be noted that it is formed with teeth that engage with the outer conductor 34. The clamping function, however, of the outer conductor can be performed by other and independent clamping means.

It will be apparent that by reason of the split ring construction of the collars 26 and 28, they can be compressed radially to perform the clamping functions referred to. This in practice is achieved by means of the clamping surface 36 on the collar 26 which is at an incline to the principal axis thereof and which is also adapted to yield to forces thereagainst to radially compress the ring. This is achieved in use by threading the sections of the frame and 12 relatively closer to each other by turning them with respect to each other so that the clamping surface 36 slides under the free end 38 of the casing section 10 to radially compress the outer ring 26 and therefore the inner ring 28 to achieve the clamping functions. When the threadedly engaging parts 12 and 10 are moved in the opposite direction, the resilience of the inner ring 28 permits it to re-insert itself and to expand the outer ring whereby clamping arrangement on the socket 22 and on the outer surface of the cable is released.

Numeral 14 refers to a third casing section that threadedly engages in the open end of the section 12, and when tightened compression an O-ring 40 to provide a moisture seal around the outer surface 34 of the cable 16. An O-ring 42 is provided for a similar purpose between the casing sections 10 and 12.

Numerals 44 and 46 refer to a mounting nut and washer, respectively, for mounting the connector on the wall of a control box where the cable is connected. Once mounted by means of the mounting means 44 and 46-, circuit connections within the box can be made in the usual way with the socket contact 18 and the outer conductor. It will be appreciated that the outer ring 26 serves to effect a good electrical connection between the parts of the casing and thereby continue the other conductor through to the control box in use.

Embodiments of this invention other than the one illustrated will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

What we claim as our invention is:

l. A connector for coaxial cable comprising a tubular casing of electricity conducting material, having at least a tubular base and a tubular base cap, said casing having a contact electrically insulated therefrom, said contact having a yieldable tubular socket adapted to receive the centre conductor of a coaxial cable, said base and said tubular base cap having their principal axes aligned and being movable relatively to each other along their principal axes, a tubular cable clamp carried by one of said base and said base cap, said tubular cable clamp having an outer electricity conducting metallic collar and an inner collar of a resilient electricity insulating material, said outer collar and said inner collar being radially compressible, said outer collar being formed with a clamping surface at an incline to the principal axis thereof, said base and base cap being formed to receive said outer collar therebetween and to exert a force on said clamping surface thereof to radially compress said clamp as said base and base cap are moved towards each other.

2. A connector for coaxial cable as claimed in claim 1, in which said outer collar and said inner collar are each in the form of a split ring.

3. A connector as claimed in claim 1, in which said outer collar and said tubular base and said tubular base cap are all made of a similar metal.

4. A connector as claimed in claim 2, in which said outer collar and said tubular base and said tubular base cap are all made of a similar metal.

5. A connector for coaxial cable as claimed in claim 1, in which said outer collar is formed with an inside diameter adapted to receive and clamp the outer conductor of a coaxial cable.

6. A connector for coaxial cabl as claimed in claim 2, in which said outer collar is formed with an inside diameter adapted to receive and clamp the outer conductor of a coaxial cable.

7. A connector as claimed in claim 1, in which said outer collar and said tubular base and said tubular base cap are all made of a similar metal and in which said outer collar is formed with an inside diameter adapted to receive and clamp the outer conductor of a coaxial cable.

8. A connector as claimed in claim 2, in which said outer collar and said tubular base and said tubular base cap are all made of a similar metal and in which said outer collar is formed with an inside diameter adapted to receive and clamp the outer conductor of a coaxial cable.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,292,136 12/1966 Somerset 339-103 X FOREIGN PATENTS 920,725 3/1963 Great Britain.

RICHARD E. MOORE, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 3 391 03

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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GB920725A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3671926 *Aug 3, 1970Jun 20, 1972Lindsay Specialty Prod LtdCoaxial cable connector
US3675184 *Oct 17, 1969Jul 4, 1972United Carr IncCombined cable clamp and seal for a backshell
US3683320 *May 8, 1970Aug 8, 1972Bunker RamoCoaxial cable connectors
US3686623 *Nov 13, 1969Aug 22, 1972Bunker RamoCoaxial cable connector plug
US3706958 *Oct 28, 1970Dec 19, 1972IttCoaxial cable connector
US3744011 *Oct 28, 1971Jul 3, 1973IttCoaxial cable connector
US3831004 *Jul 27, 1973Aug 20, 1974Fast Heat Element Mfg CoElectric heater
US3854789 *Oct 2, 1972Dec 17, 1974Kaplan EConnector for coaxial cable
US3997232 *May 19, 1975Dec 14, 1976Century Electric Motor Co.Submersible electric motor and electrical connector assembly
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US5586910 *Aug 11, 1995Dec 24, 1996Amphenol CorporationClamp nut retaining feature
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Classifications
U.S. Classification439/584
International ClassificationH01R13/646, H01R9/05
Cooperative ClassificationH01R2103/00, H01R9/0521, H01R24/52
European ClassificationH01R24/52, H01R9/05P