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Publication numberUS3504384 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 7, 1970
Filing dateOct 14, 1964
Priority dateOct 23, 1963
Publication numberUS 3504384 A, US 3504384A, US-A-3504384, US3504384 A, US3504384A
InventorsFraser William Stuart, Moss George Ernest, Radley Jack Augustus, Thompson John Hilton
Original AssigneeRussell Research Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toilet bowl cleaning and disinfecting device
US 3504384 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1970 J. A. RADLEY ETAL 3,504,384

TOILET BOWL CLEANING AND DISINFEGTING DEVICE Filed Oct. 14, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 IIII I l 'll/11111111 I April 7, 1970 J. A. RADLEY ETAL 3,504,384

TOILET BOWL CLEANING AND DISINFECTING DEVICE Filed Oct. 14, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 i a y 12 United States Patent 3,504,384 TOILET BOWL CLEANING AND DISINFECTING DEVICE Jack Augustus Radley, William Stuart Fraser, and George Ernest Moss, Reading, and John Hilton Thompson, Liverpool, England, assignors to Russell Research Lim ited, London, England Filed Oct. 14, 1964, Ser. No. 403,833 Claims priority, application Great Britain, Oct. 23, 1963, 41,869/ 63 Int. Cl. E03d 9/03 US. Cl. 4228 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A toilet bowl cleaning and disinfecting device to be afiixed to the inside of the toilet cistern at a point intermediate the full and flushed levels of the water in the cistern. The device has a non-porous compartment which contains water soluble cleaning medium, and that compartment has at least one aperture through which the entrapped air can escape when the device is submerged in the cistern, through which a quantity of water can flow to form a concentrated solution with a portion of the cleaning medium, and from which the concentrated solution can flow when the water level in the cistern is lowered by flushing. Furthermore, there is a separate nonporous retaining means which contains a water-soluble disinfectant which may be independently exposed to the water.

The present invention relates to a device for cleaning and disinfecting toilet bowls, urinals and the like.

The normal method of cleaning toilet bowls, urinals and the like (hereinafter referred to as lavatory bowls) is by the application of a detergent, disinfectant or the like to the bowl and/ or to liquid trapped therein and this usually means that the detergent or, in some cases, an acidic bleaching or other cleaning medium, possibly with a disinfectant, is only applied at infrequent intervals and with uncertainty as to how long the charge will remain to act on any accumulated deposit on the bowl before the next flush.

Although in some cases it is possible to suspend a device containing a block of a mixture of disinfectant and detergent in the cistern so that a combined solution is flushed each time, often the detergent and disinfectant are incompatible and when used in the relative proportions which will be effective cannot effectively be mixed into one composition.

According to the present invention, there is provided a container for insertion into a lavatory cistern or urinal at a fixed location between full and flushed levels of wa ter therein and containing or adapted to contain separately a soluble cleaning medium and a solution disinfectant medium, and comprising (A) a non-porous compartment for one medium having a port or ports by which a quantity of water may flow into the non-porous compartment and on coming into contact with a surface of the medium dissolve a quantity of the medium and from which the solution formed may flow out of the compartment and into the cistern when the water level in the cistern is lowered as the result of a flushing action and, (B) a separate location for the other medium such that ice in operation a surface of the other medium will be independently exposed to the water in the cistern.

Usually the cleaning medium, e.g. detergent is in the compartment (A), and the disinfectant medium in the location (B), which is most conveniently formed as a nonporous compartment or a container. The eifect of this is that the disinfectant only comes into mixture with the dilute solution of the detergent in the body of water in the cistern and is virtually isolated from the detergent medium itself and from the more heavily charged quantity of water which has dissolved the detergent in solution and is substantially trapped in the detergent compartment. In some cases the separate location (B) contains or is adapted to contain the other medium so that the latter will be in free contact with the water in the cistern; in other cases, however, the other medium (usually disinfectant) is held in a compartment communicating with the surrounding water via ports, and forms a relatively concentrated solution between flushing the cistern.

The device may be formed like a cup constituting the compartment (A) and containing the cleaning medium, e.g. as a paste or block, and having the port or ports in its peripheral wall above the level of the cleaning medium, and the disinfectant medium may be in a shallow cup constituting compartment (B) and forming a lid or closure for the compartment (A) of the cup and defining a space between its base and the level of the cleaning medium to which water can have access and departure by way of the said ports. The shallow cup may be a press, screw or other suitable fit in the open top of the container above the ports, which preferably extend at least to the bottom of the shallow cup to prevent air being trapped in the space when the device is inserted into a cistern, and the disinfectant medium may be provided in this shallow cup so that when the device is properly arrnaged in a cistern the surface of the disinfectant medium will be freely exposed to the water, while a quantity of water will be practically isolated in the space aforesaid to dissolve the cleaning medium.

The disinfectant compositions used may be of a volatile character and should preferably be sealed off from the atmosphere in the cup until ready to be immersed in the water in the cistern, by a removable (e.g. peelable or water soluble) plastic or other suitable disc or cover or a sealed envelope, which can be printed with instructive or other indicia.

In an alternative and preferred embodiment of the invention there is provided a non-porous cup-like container forming the compartment (A) and containing the cleaning medium, this compartment having the port or ports in its peripheral wall above the level of the cleaning medium; and a means for holding disinfectant attached to the outside of the cup-like container and forming the separate location (B) which, in operation, affords the water in the cistern access to the disinfectant.

It is especially convenient if the means for holding disinfectant is a second non-porous cup-like container closed by the base of the first cup-like container and forming a separate compartment (B) containing the disinfectant medium.

Usually, of course, this second cup-like container will have a port or ports in and towards the top of its periph eral wall, so positioned as to prevent air being trapped in the second container when it fills with water.

A further port or ports may be provided towards the bottom of the peripheral wall, or in the base of the second container.

Preferably, the disinfectant contained in compartment (B) (e.g. in the form of a tablet) is enclosed in or covered with a water-soluble seal to prevent volatilization and/or decomposition of the disinfectant before use.

It is especially valuable if the first cup-like container has a deep crowned lid to increase the quantity of water to be held in contact with the cleaning medium. In such a preferred structure, a further port or ports may be provided at the top of the crowned lid to prevent air being trapped as water rises therein.

Where it is desired to suspend the device in the cistern, it may be provided with a deformable strip which can be formed to a hook and clamped between the top of the cistern and its cover. Another possible embodiment is provided with a rubber or plastic sucker on the outside, and can therefore adhere to the inside of the cistern. Again, an extendable wire (e.g. a coiled wire) can be attached to the device and will thus compensate for the various sizes of cistern.

The detergent medium is selected so that it will only be dissolved very slowly by the water since frequent replenishment of the material or renewal of the device is to be avoided.

It has been found that a suitable cleaning medium is a block of detergent or paste of detergent which will dissolve in static water at 17 C. at a rate of from 0.01 to 0.10 gram per hour from a surface area of 2.5 square inches. It is preferred that the detergent used should foam not greater than 100 mm. as determined on a Ross-Miles foam column and that the melting point should preferably lie between 40 C. and 70 C. The detergent composition preferably incorporates a dye for indicating purposes. In one preferred formulation, the cleaning medium comprises detergent in proportions from 50 to 99%; dyestutf from to and other water-soluble material including organic solvents from 0 to 49% Although in principle any suitably compressed solid detergent may be used, especially valuable detergents are the condensation products of propylene glycol of molecular weight 1500-1800 and about 140 moles ethylene oxide (or known as PLURONIC F. 68); 3,6-dimethyl- 3,6-dihydroxy-oct-4-yne; 2,5-dimethyl-2,S-dihydroxy-hex- 3-yne; and 3,6-dimethyl-3,6-dihydroxy-hex-3-yne.

We have obtained particularly good results with the following composition (referred to in the example :below as Part 1):

Grams PLURONIC F. 68 flake 58.5 Disulphide blue VN150 1.5

It is of advantage for economic reasons and so that the indication of the dye should also serve to indicate the state of near exhaustion of the disinfectant that the disinfectant and the detergent be in such relative proportions and so respectively selected as to their dissolving rates that they will be exhausted as far as possible at or about the same time, or the disinfectant will outlast the detergent.

The disinfectant composition should preferably be chosen so as to dissolve in static water at 17 C. at a rate of from 0.005 to 0.05 gram per hour from a surface area of 2.5 square inches, preferably at a rate not exceeding 0.03 gram per hour.

If the embodiment where the disinfectant is packed in the lid of the detergent container is used, it is suitable for the detergent composition and the disinfectant composition to be present within the ratios of 2:1 to 4:1 by weight.

A suitable disinfectant serving as an efficient bacteri- Grams FICLOR 91 12.0 p-Dichlorobenzene 8.0

This is referred to in the example as Part 2. p-Dichlorobenzene may be replaced by another suitable vehicle such as a metallic gel, e.g., a stearate of aluminum, zinc, or magnesium, gelled with one or more hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, mineral oils or turpentine.

EXAMPLE We employed (in the device of FIGS. 1 and 2) an amount by weight of the disinfectant composition of 20 grams and an amount by weight of the detergent composition of 60 grams. The disinfectant composition was made to fill its cup to the brim in a dry compact form and the detergent medium filled its compartment save for a top space under the first said cup of about 4 cubic inches, a surface area of the disinfectant block of about 2 square inches and of the detergent block of about 2.25 square inches being provided.

Tests have been carried out as to solution rates for different disinfectant formuations (Part 2 aforesaid). In an accelerated test, specimens were placed in running water (40 gallons per hour) for 17 hours and the Weight losses were:

Formulation: Loss (grams) 50% FICLOR 0.33 60% FICLOR 0.37 67% FICLOR 0.40

In a static test, each sample was immersed in one gallon of water for 15 minutes. The chlorine content of the water was then determined, and was as follows:

Formulation: Chlorine (p.p.m.) 50% FICLOR 0.25 60% FICLOR 0.35 67% FICLOR 0.6

We consider that the most favourable concentration limits for Ficlor 91 should be from 57-62%.

The solution ratio as between Parts 1 and 2 was found in accelerated tests (running water) to be about 5:1 and in real (static) use tests to be approximately 4:1 but it is preferred that the ratio chosen be somewhat lower, e.g., 3:1 to ensure that Part 2 shall outlast Part 1.

The tests for bactericidal efficiency under normal use conditions showed that about 99% of bacteria were killed in 0.10 second following flushing.

The invention is hereinafter more particularly described with reference to the accompanying drawings which diagrammatically illustrate by way of example two devices according to the invention. In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is an exploded vertical section of a device according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the device of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a vertical section of an alternative embodiment of the device of the invention.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2 it will be seen that the device comprises a deep non-porous cup-shaped container 1 constituting compartment (A) and containing the block or compact 2 of detergent material including the dye. It is about 3.2" deep and has an inside diameter of about 1.7" at the surface of the detergent block or compact, the volume of the block being about 3 cubic inches. The

peripheral wall 3 of the container is formed with diametrically opposite slot-like ports 4. The block or compact 5 of the disinfectant material fills a shallow nonporous cup 6 constituting compartment (B) and this cup is a press fit in the top of the container 1 but leaves the bottom of the ports 4 open to define a space of, say, 3-5 cubic inches, between the bottom of the shallow cup and the surface of the block or compact 2. The fact that the ports 4 extend at least to the bottom of the shallow cup 6 ensures that air is not trapped in the said space when the device is inserted into a cistern.

A flexible strip, wire or the like S (not shown in FIG. 1) is threaded through the ports and can be deformed in to hook form at its free end for clamping by the cover of the cistern onto the top edge of one of the walls of the cistern. The shallow cup may have longitudinal locating ribs 7 to co-operate with slots or grooves 7a' in the top of the container 1, the length of the slots being such as to limit the extent to which the shallow cup 6 can be inserted in the top of the container 1.

The disinfectant composition used in the embodiment shown is of a volatile or decomposable nature and accordingly is required to be sealed off until such time as the device is inserted into a cistern, and this may be done by means of a peelable plastic disc D having a finger tab d whereby it may be gripped which is shown partly removed in FIG. 2.

The preferred device shown in FIG. 3 again comprises a deep non-porous cup-shaped container 1 constituting compartment (A) and containing a block or compact 2 of detergent material. The peripheral wall of the container 1 is formed with slots 4. The peripheral wall 3 is flanged at 5 around the mouth of the container and is covered with a deep crowned lid 6 with ports 7 in the top. This lid is a press fit within the top of container 1.

A second non-porous cup-like container 8 fits on at the base of container 1. In the example shown, a simple press fit is indicated, but a screw-fit or some other positive attachment may be used. Alternatively, the two containers may be attached by an adhesive or otherwise stuck together. This container also has parts 9 in its peripheral wall 10 and ports 9a in its base. Ports 9 are so located that no air is trapped in the container 8 when it fills with water. Within this container 8 is a tablet 11 of a disinfectant composition within a sachet 12 of a water-soluble film formed of polyvinyl alcohol derivatives or mixtures or compounds thereof to prevent volatilization or decomposition of the disinfectant in storage.

The whole device may be suspended by a loop of wire 13.

This device is placed in a cistern so that within a period of time (say 48 hours) the water-soluble film has dissolved, preferably within one hour.

As the cistern empties, relatively concentrated solution of detergent leaves from ports 4 followed by a solution of disinfectant from ports 9a as the water level falls still lower.

As the cistern fills up again, water enters compartment (B), dissolving further disinfectant and thereafter enters compartment (A), dissolving further detergent. It will be noted that the detergent and disinfectant are separate from one another so that even if they are incompatible no drawbacks are caused.

What is claimed is:

1. A toilet bowl cleaning and disinfecting device capable of being suspended in the toilet cistern at a fixed location between the full and flushed levels of the water therein, and comprising a non-porous compartment containing a water soluble cleaning medium, said compartment having at least one aperture through which entrapped air may escape when said device is submerged in the cistern, through which a quantity of water flows in and forms a concentrated solution with a portion of cleaning medium, and from which said solution flows out when the water level in the cistern is lowered by flushing; and a separate non-porous retaining means containing a'water soluble disinfectant medium which is independently exposed to the water in said cistern.

2. A device as claimed in claim 1, wherein said compartment is a cup-like container-having said aperture in its peripheral wall above the level of said cleaning medium; and said retaining means is a shallow cup constituing a closure for said cup-like container such that a space is defined between the base of said shallow cup and the level of said cleaning medium to which water can have access and departure solely by way of said aperture.

3. A device as claimed in claim 1, wherein said aperture is in the peripheral wall above the level of the cleaning medium in said compartment, and said retaining means is attached to the outside of said compartment.

4. A device as claimed in claim 1 wherein if the two said mediums are not exhausted at the same time, said disinfectant medium will outlast said cleaning medium.

5. A device as claimed in claim 1 in which said cleaning medium is a detergent which will dissolve in static water at 17 C. at a rate of from 0.01 to 0.10 gram per hour from a surface area of 2.5 square inches.

6. A device as claimed in claim 1 wherein the deep said disinfectant medium is such as will dissolve in static water at 17 C. at a rate of from 0.005 to 0.05 gram per hour from a surface area of 2.5 square inches.

7. A device as claimed in claim 3, in which said retaining means is a cup-like container closed by the base of said compartment.

8. A device as claimed in claim 7, in which said cuplike container also has at least one opening in and towards the top of its peripheral wall, so positioned as to prevent air being trapped therein when it fills with water.

9. A device as claimed in claim 8, in which at least one further opening is provided in the base of said cup-like container.

10. A device as claimed in claim 3, in which said compartment has a deep crowned lid to increase the quantity of water to be held in contact with said cleaning medium.

11. A device as claimed in claim 10, in which at least one further aperture is provided at the top of said crowned lid to prevent air from being trapped as water rises therein.

12. A device as claimed in claim 5, in which said detergent consists essentially of from 50 to 99% detergent, 0 to 5% dyestulf and from 0 to 49% of other watersoluble or miscible material including organic solvents.

13. A device as claimed in claim 5-, in which said detergent is selected from a group consisting essentially of the condensation product of propylene glycol of molecular weight 1500-180O and about moles ethylene oxide; 3,6-dimethyl-3,6-dihydroxy-oct-4-yne; 2,5-dimethyl- 2,5-dihydroxy-hex-3-yne; or 3,6-dimethyl-3,6-dihydroxyhex-3-yne.

14. A device as claimed in claim 2 in which said aperture in the peripheral wall of said cup-like container extends upwards to the level of the base of said shallow cup to prevent air being trapped in the space between said cup and said cleaning medium.

15. A device as claimed in claim 2 wherein said cleaning and disinfectant mediums are present within the ratios 2:1 to 4:1 by weight.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 429,384 6/ 1890 Manwaring 4-228 730,494 6/1903 Venners 4228 2,086,937 7/1937 Harborne 4228 2,789,078 4/1957 Trusler l67--30 2,807,807 10/ 1957 Harper 4228 3,093,835 6/1963 Kaplan 4-228 3,121,236 2/1964 Yadro et a1. 4228 3,169,905 2/ 1965 Lambert 2158 (Other references on following page) 7 UNITED STATES PATENTS Lambert 16742 Symes 167-'-33 Saulson 4-112 Kowalski 167-33 Kristensen et a1. 4227 Ressler 2158 Gross et a1. 21-58 Nikawitz 21-458 Davis et a1. 2158 Walker 21- -58 Finkbiner 4-228 Wilson 4-1 12 Great Britain. Great Britain. Great Britain. Great Britain. Great Britain. Belgium.

LAVERNE D. GEIGER, Primary Examiner 10 D. B. MASSENBERG, Assistant Examiner

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Classifications
U.S. Classification4/227.6
International ClassificationE03D9/02, E03D9/03
Cooperative ClassificationE03D9/038
European ClassificationE03D9/03D6
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 27, 1983AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: AMERICAN HOME PRODUCTS CORPORATION, A DE CORP.
Effective date: 19830119
Owner name: BOYLE-MIDWAY, INC., 685 THIRD AVE, NEW YORK, NY A
Jan 27, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: BOYLE-MIDWAY, INC., 685 THIRD AVE, NEW YORK, NY A
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:AMERICAN HOME PRODUCTS CORPORATION, A DE CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004091/0332
Effective date: 19830119
Jun 29, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: AMERICAN HOME PRODUCTS CORPORATION, 685 THIRD AVE,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:THOMPSON AND CAPPER LIMITED;REEL/FRAME:003864/0736
Effective date: 19801121
Jun 29, 1981AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: AMERICAN HOME PRODUCTS CORPORATION, 685 THIRD AVE,
Effective date: 19801121
Owner name: THOMPSON AND CAPPER LIMITED
Jun 5, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: THOMPSON & CAPPER LIMITED, 3 GODDARD RD. ASTMOOR I
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:RUSSELL RESEARCH LIMITED;REEL/FRAME:003858/0372
Effective date: 19800926
Jun 5, 1981AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: RUSSELL RESEARCH LIMITED
Owner name: THOMPSON & CAPPER LIMITED, 3 GODDARD RD. ASTMOOR I
Effective date: 19800926