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Publication numberUS3507660 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 21, 1970
Filing dateNov 26, 1965
Priority dateNov 26, 1964
Also published asDE1547823A1, DE1547823B2
Publication numberUS 3507660 A, US 3507660A, US-A-3507660, US3507660 A, US3507660A
InventorsNishio Fukihiko, Tuchiya Yoshinori, Yoneyama Masakazu
Original AssigneeFuji Photo Film Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Photographic materials containing long-chain alkyl sucrose urethane
US 3507660 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent PHOTOGRAPHIC MATERIALS CONTAINING LONG-CHAIN ALKYL SUCROSE URETHANE Fukihiko Nishio, Masakazu Yoneyama, and Yoshinori Tuchiya, Ashigara-Kamigun, Kanagawa, Japan, assignors to Fuji Shashin Film Kabushiki Kaisha, Ashigara- Kamigun, Kanagawa, Japan No Drawing. Filed Nov. 26, 1965, Ser. No. 510,090 Claims priority, application Japan, Nov. 26, 1964,

Int. Cl. G03c 1/38 US. Cl. 96114.5 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A gelatin containing photographic composition and a photographic light-sensitive element are disclosed. The composition contains from .05 to 100 g. per 1 kg. of dry gelatin of one of the following compounds:

CHQOR O H H HOHzC wherein R is an alkyl group of from 7 to 16 carbon atoms. The element contains a support and a photographic silver halide emulsion layer and the emulsion contains the above compound.

The present invention relates to photography and, more particularly to a gelatin-containing photographic material mainly composed of gelatin for photographic films or photographic papers, said material containing a longchain alkyl sucrose ether or urethane. By incorporating such a surface active agent as mentioned above in a photographic gelatin layer, that is, a photographic emulsion layer and/ or a protective layer, the wetting property of the layer with the surface of a support can be improved and uniform coating can be formed on the support.

It has been variously reported to add natural or synthetic surface active agents in various photographic coating solutions to improve the properties thereof. However, there is trouble in the case of adding natural surface active agents that the quality of the surface active agent is not always constant. On the other hand, it has been reported that by the addition of conventionally known surface active agents, various advantages can be obtained besides improving the wetting property. That is, an antistatic property is endowed, the photographic processing solution can be easily diffused, the troubles caused by water drops can be reduced, air bubbles formed in the case of applying a gelatin sol on a cold-set emulsion surface can be extinguished, development can be accelerated, and staining of a support by a halation preventing dye can be prevented. However, since almost all of the synthetic surface active agents are very peculiar to these actions, although they are effective for some specific photographic emulsions or gelatin compositions, they are sometimes useless to other compositions for improving wetability or preventing the formation of repellances. Therefore, most of the synthetic surface active agents can be used only within a restricted range of use. For these reasons, there have been provided uses of many different types of surface active agents for photography.

One of the most difficult problems is uniformly coating colloidal silver suspended in a diluted gelatin solution. In this case, it is considered to be impossible to obtain a uniform suspension of colloidal silver and to coat it on surfaces without the formation of bubbles and repellences.

Therefore, an object of this invention is to provide an improved gelatin-containing solution having improved coating property.

Another object of this invention is to provide a photographic emulsion or a gelatin composition not accompanied by repellences and other coating troubles.

An additional object of this invention is to provide a photographic gelatin layer on which a second gelatin layer can be easily coated by applying both layers on a support through separate coating means or by simultaneously applying them on a substratum cooled in a wet state.

A further object of this invention is to provide an antistatic effect in the case of coating a coating solution upon a film support.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a coating process while maintaining a coating solution stable, such that no precipitates are formed even in the case of melting at a high temperature.

These and other objects of this invention will become clear in view of the following descriptions.

The inventors have found that these objects can be achieved by adding in a coating solution a long chain alkyl sucrose ether or urethane.

It is considered that the above long-chain monoalkylsucrose ether and urethane can be shown by the following general formula:

onion 0 H H H Home 0 H H OH HO OH H omoH i i OH H H OH (IDHaOCNHR H H H Homo 0 H H OH HO OH 0 l I CHzOH l H OH H H OH wherein R represents an alkyl group containing from 7 to 16 carbon atoms. In this case, if the carbon number is less than 7, the compound has no surface-active property and, if the carbon number is higher than 16, the compound becomes insoluble in water. In both cases the objects of this invention become unattainable.

The surface active agent in this invention may be added in a photographic coating solution in an amount of 0.05 g. per 1 kg. of dried gelatin, and preferably in an amount of 0.1-50 g.

By the addition of the surface active agent, the surface tension of the coating solution is remarkably lowered, the coating solution becomes free of bubbles, and extremely uniform coating can be obtained not only by usual-speed coating, but also by high-speed coating. Further, if a large amount of the surface active agent is incorporated in a photographic emulsion, it does not give yellow fogging which is inevitably accompanied with the use of other conventional nonionic surface active agents. It also does not have a bad influence on the photographic properties. Furthermore, the surface active agent of the invention may be used together with other known surface active agents.

Example 1 A silver bromochloride photographic emulsion containing 7% gelatin and 5% silver halide was prepared. Into the thus prepared photographic emulsion was added the monododecyl ether or sucrose in an amount of 0.5 g. per 1 kg. of emulsion. The photographic emulsion was coated on a baryta paper and set by cooling without drying. On the thus coated layer there was coated a gelatin solution containing di-2-ethylhexyl sodium sulfosuccinate in an amount of 0.2 gin 1 l. of the 2.5 gelatin solution and it was dried after setting by cooling. The thus obtained photographic emulsion layer and the protective film layer were satisfactory. That is, no bubbles were observed in either the photographic emulsion layer or the protective film layer, and they could be applied at a high speed as compared with that by usual coating method.

Example 2 Coating was conducted in the same manner as in Example l, but using sucrose monodecyl urethane as the surface active agent. This case gave satisfactory results as in Example 1.

Example 3 A silver bromo-chloride photographic emulsioncontaining 7% gelatin and 5% silver halides was prepared. Into the photographic emulsion was added sucrose monododecyl urethane varying the amount in a range of 0.1- 3.2 g. per 1 kg. of photographic emulsion. In this case, the sucrose monodecyl urethane was added as a 2% aqueous solution. The emulsion was coated on a baryta paper and dried. The number of repellences and oil spots on thus obtained emulsion-coated photographic papers were investigated in various concentrations of the surface active agent and the results are shown in the following table, which shows that the numbers of repellences and oil spots are aflFectively reduced by an increase in the addition amount of the surface active agent.

Concentration of the surface active agent Number of repellences Number of oil spots in emulsion (g.lkg.) (No./1O sq. m.) (No./10 sq. m.)

Example 4 The procedure as in Example 3 was repeated using sucrose monodecyl ether, which showed as in Example 3, that the number of repellences and oil spots is remarkably reduced as the amount of the surface active agent is increased.

Example 5 S.D.S., gJkg. Em.

s.M.D.U., g./kg. Em. 2 4 s 16 32 In the preceding table, a number in the parenthesis represents the number of oil spots in 10 sq. m. and a number outside the parenthesis represents the number of repellences in 10 sq. m.

From the above results is was found that the surface properties of the coated baryta papers were very improved in the range of the balance of the addition amounts (S.M.D.U.:S.D.S.) being 3 :1 to 8:1.

Example 6 A high-sensitivity photographic emulsion for X-ray photography containing 7% gelatin and 6% silver iodobromide was prepared. Into the photographic emulsion was added sucrose mono-dodecyl urethane in an amount of 0.2 g. per 1 kg. of emulsion. The photographic emulsion was coated on a triacetyl cellulose support and, without drying, was set by cooling. On the thus formed layer there was applied a gelatin solution containing sodium long-chain alkylbenzene sulfonate in an amount of 0.1 g. per 1 l. of a 2.5% gelatin solution and, after setting by cooling, the coating was dried. In this case, no bubbles were observed in both photographic emulsion layer and protective layer. Also, the coatings were applied with a sufficient speed. Moreover, the photographic film obtained by this process has very excellent anti-static properties.

What is claimed is:

1. A gelatin-containing photographic composition containing the compound:

II CHzOCNHR HzC 0 H e e HO OH H 011.011

OH H

HOH

wherein R represents an alkyl group having from 7 to 16 carbon atoms.

2. The gelatin-containing photographic composition as claimed in claim 1 wherein said compound is contained in said composition in an amount of from about 0.05 to g. per 1 kg. of dry gelatin.

3. The gelatin-containing photographic composition as claimed in claim 1 wherein said compound is contained in said composition in an amount of from about 0.1 to 50 g. per 1 kg. of dry gelatin.

4. The gelatin-containing photographic composition as claimed in claim 1 wherein said photographic compo sition is a photographic silver halide gelatin emulsion.

5. The gelatin-containing photographic composition as claimed in claim 1 wherein said photographic composition is a protective coating composition.

6. A photographic light-sensitive element comprising 6 wherein R represents an alkyl group having from 7 to 16 support and a photographic silver halide emulsion layer carbon atoms.

containing the compound: References Cited H UNITED STATES PATENTS CHZOCNR 5 3,170,915 2/1965 Gaertner 252 451 l 3,220,847 11/1965 Knox et al 96-94 H H H HOHZG O 3,300,413 1/1967 Ames 252 -351 3,314,936 4/1967 Ames 252 351 HO OH H 1 011201:

\I 6 H FOREIGN PATENTS H OH 642,936 7/1964 Belgium. wherein R represents an alkyl group having from 7 to 16 OTHER REFERENCES carobn atoms.

7. A photographic light-sensitive element comprising a. support, a photographic silver halide emulsion layer, and a protective layer containing gelatin, at least one of said layers containing the compound:

V. R. Gaertner: Journal of the American Oil Chemists Society, Sucrose Ether and Ester-Linked Surfactants,

VOl. 38, 1961, pp. 410-418.

Chem. Absts., vol. 64, 1966, 17702 f. Chem. Absts., vol. 60, 1964, 9350 c.

o 0112011161116 20 NORMAN G. TORCHIN, Primary Examiner MARY F. KELLEY, Assistant Examiner

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3170915 *Apr 11, 1960Feb 23, 1965Monsanto CoSucrose ethers
US3220847 *Feb 23, 1962Nov 30, 1965Eastman Kodak CoPhotographic gelatin layers containing the water-soluble salts of various half esters of substituted succinic acid as coating aids
US3300413 *Jul 12, 1965Jan 24, 1967Ames Geoffrey RSurface active compositions containing mixtures of mono- and di-alkyloxymethyl ethers of sugar
US3314936 *Aug 14, 1963Apr 18, 1967Geoffrey R AmesProcess for the production of ethers of organic polyhydroxy compounds
BE642936A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5582963 *Oct 30, 1995Dec 10, 1996Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Containing nonionic surfactants
US6071688 *Jul 29, 1998Jun 6, 2000Eastman Kodak CompanyContacting coating material on a support with uniform cloud of additive vaporized by flowing carrier gas through liquid phase additive
US6153034 *Aug 3, 1998Nov 28, 2000Micromod R.P. LtdRapid prototyping
US7250202Jun 18, 1999Jul 31, 2007Ilford Imaging Ch GmbhSupport with image receiver sheet
EP0112162A2Dec 13, 1983Jun 27, 1984Konica CorporationLight-sensitive silver halide photographic material
EP0549496A1 *Dec 23, 1992Jun 30, 1993Eastman Kodak CompanyGlycoside surfactants as coating aids for photographic layers
Classifications
U.S. Classification430/635, 106/146.1, 430/640
International ClassificationG03C1/30
Cooperative ClassificationG03C1/303
European ClassificationG03C1/30G