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Publication numberUS3508302 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 28, 1970
Filing dateJul 3, 1968
Priority dateJul 3, 1968
Publication numberUS 3508302 A, US 3508302A, US-A-3508302, US3508302 A, US3508302A
InventorsTheodore R Settanni
Original AssigneeTheodore R Settanni
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Clip device for adjustment of suspended ceilings,and ceiling incorporating the same
US 3508302 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 28, 1970 T. SETTANNI 3,508,302

CLIP DEVICE FOR ADJUSTMENT OF SUSPENDED CEILING'S, AND- CEILING' INCORPORATING THE SAME Filed July 5, 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 roam/5Y5] Apr]! 28, 1970 T. R. SETTANNI 3,508,302

CLIP DEVICE FOR ADJUSTMENT OF SUSPENDED CEILINGS, AND

' CEILING INCORPORATING THE SAME Filed July 5, 1968 2 Sheets$heet 2 INVENTOR. TA EODOBE P. .557'74/V/V/ United States Patent CLIP DEVICE FOR AD JUSTMENT 0F SUSPENDED CEILIN GS, AND CEILING INCORPORATIN G THE SAME Theodore R. Settanni, 1422 S. Hesperian, Santa Ana, Calif. 92704 Filed July 3, 1968, Ser. No. 742,208 Int. Cl. A44b 21/00; E04g 17/18; E04b 7/14 US. Cl. 2471.2 11 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A clip comprising spaced and paralley face portions integrally connected to each other at one set of corresponding edges. Socket means are provided on the clip to permit insertion of the end of a screwdriver for turning of the clip (about a horizontal axis) and consequent bending and shortening of a ceiling-suspended wire disposed between the face portions. A substantial number of corresponding apertures are provided in the face portions for reception of nails or the like, the arrangement being such that different degrees of shortening may be achieved. The invention further comprises the combination of the clip with a ceiling construction.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention The invention relates to the filed of ceilings which are suspended by means of wires from beams or other supporting structures.

Description of the prior art Acoustical ceilings and the like are conventionally suspended by means of realtively thick metal wires from supporting structures such as wooden beams, etc. More specifically, the wires are connected to T-sectioned elements adapted to support the edge portions of acoustical panels, the connections being conventionally effected by wrapping the end of the wire after inserting the same through a hole in the stem of the T. It frequently occurs that after passage of a period of time, for example about six months, warping of the beam causes the suspended ceiling to sag in a wavy and irregular manner. It is therefore necessary to shorten numerous suspension wires by different desired amounts adapted to make the ceiling again level. conventionally, this was done by unwrapping the lower end of the wire, tightening the wire, and then rewrapping the end. Since the wire is normally thick and thus hard to bend, this was a laborious operation. Furthermore, it was difiicult to judge the degree of leveling effected, and this frequently necessitated repeating the operation several times for each wire.

The prior art contains numerous examples of wireshortening devices, for examples those shown in Patents 515,340; 638,298; 973,034; 1,982,444; 2,589,543; 2,648,- 109 and 2,741,818. However none of these was sufilciently simply and economical to be permanently incorporated in a wire adapted to suspend an acoustical ceiling or the like. Furthermore none permitted the shortening to be achieved in a very simple manner which is readily gauged or judged, and which utilizes a simple hand tool such as a screwdriver in order to provide the necessary rotation with very little effort.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention, spaced and parallel face plates may be formed of extremely economical material such as galvanized iron or steel, the plates being connected together at one set of corresponding edges.

The web which connetcs the face portions together forms one part of a socket to receive the end of a screwdriver or the like, which screwdriver then readily effects turning or rotation of the device in order to shorten the ceiling-suspending wire. The remainder of the socket may be formed in an economical manner as by inserting a nail through holes provided adjacent the web. The clip further comprises corresponding holes in the face portions to receive nails or the like, the relationship being such that different desired degrees of shortening of the wire may be achieved in a rapid, economical, and relatively effortless manner.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIGURE 1 is a view showing the present ceiling assembly incorporating the wire-shortening clip;

FIGURE 2 is a plan view of the clip;

FIGURE 3 is an end elevation thereof, 'illustrating its generally hairpin-shaped section;

FIGURE 4 is an isometric view illustarting the clip in position around a ceiling-suspending wire, preparatory to turning of the clip in order to shorten the wire a desired amount;

FIGURE 5 illustrates the position of the parts after shortening is fully effected, the screwdriver tip being shown in phantom lines;

FIGURE 6 is a view corresponding to FIGURE 5 but illustrating the operation of the device when a greater degree of shortening desired.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The ceiling-adjusting clip 10 of the present invention is preferably formed of sheet metal, for example galvanized iron or steel, although it may be formed of plastic or other materials. It is illustrated to comprise an elongated rectangular strap-like metal member which is bent at its center to provide a hairpin-like shape (FIGURE 3). Thus, spaced and parallel face portions 11 and 12 are provided and are connected by an integral web 13 which extends between corresponding edges of the face portions. The face portions 11 and 12 correspond exactly to each other, and contain holes which also correspond exactly to each other. Thus, only the front face 11 is illustrated in the drawings, it being understood that the rear face 12 is identical thereto realtive to configuration, hole size, and hole location.

The spacing between face portions 11 and 12 is sufficient to permit reception therebetween of a relatively large-diameter metal wire 15 of the type frequently employed to support acoustical ceilings and the like. Such wire is normally formed as a single strand of extruded metal. Thus, it is relatively difficult to bend, and normallyretains its set once bent. It is pointed out that acoustical ceilings may be relatively heavy, one reason being that they frequently support light fixtures, air-conditioning fixtures, etc.

Referring to FIGURE 1, a wire 15 is suitably connected to a screw-eye 16 which is threaded into a wooden beam 17 forming part of the building in which the ceiling is mounted. At its lower end, wire 15 is extended through a hole in the stem portion 18 of a T-sectioned supporting element 19, the element 19 having cross-arm portions 20 on which the edges 21 of acoustical ceiling panels 22 are adapted to rest. The realtively stiff end of the wire 15 is wrapped about itself through several turns, as indicated at 23, in order to connect the wire to the stem 18. It is this joint at 23 which is difficult to unwind and re-form in order to cause the ceiling panels 22 to be level despite the fact that the beam 17 frequently sags after the installation has been in place for a number of months.

Means are provided on the clip 10 to form a socket for reception of a small hand tool of a type normally carried by workmen. Such tool may be a scewdriver, the tip of which is indicated in phantom at 25 in FIGURES 5 and 6. The socket-forming means comprises a portion 13a at one end of the web 13, and a cooperating nail 26 which is inserted through corresponding holes 27 formed in face portions 11 and 12. More specifically, the nail 26 and the holes 27 are located adjacent the upper edges of face portions 11 and 12, and spaced sufliciently far away from web portion 13a to permit reception of the screwdriver tip 25 as illustrated.

It is pointed out that the nail 26 may be left in place after completion of the ceiling adjustment operation, or it may (if desired) be removed and reused in another clip 10. The nail 26 may be eliminated and replaced by suitably dimpded (or otherwise formed) portions of the face plates 11 and 12.

Second and third nails 28 and 29 are extended through holes 30 and 31, respectively, formed in face ortions 11 and 12. Such nails 28 and 29 comprise the main bending nails since they create a couple and bear against opposite sides of wire 15 in response to turning of the clip about a horizontal axis, by means of the screwdriver, thus providing a bend in the Wire in order to shorten the same as desired. The nail 28 and the holes 30 therefor are located adjacent the lower edges of face portions 11 and 12 and also relatively adjacent the web 13. However, such location is not sufficiently close to web 13 that the latter may engage and tend to cut the wire.

The nail 29 and its associated holes 31 are located generally between the holes 27 and 30 (nails 26 and 28), being relatively adjacent web 13 but preferably spaced farther therefrom than are the nails 26 and 28. Also, nail 29 (and holes 31) are relatively close to nail 26. The nail 29 and its holes 31 are preferably located in off-center relationship relative to arcuately-arranged locking holes which permit wire-locking functions and which will next be described. This permits relatively large amounts of kinking of the wire when certain locking holes are employed, and smaller amounts when others are employed.

Provided in generally arcuate arrangement about the face portions 11 and 12 are locking holes 32-43 adapted selectively to receive a locking pin or nail 44. The end holes 32 are adjacent the upper edges of face portions 11 and 12, wheras the other end holes 43 are relatively adjacent the lower edges of such face portions. The central holes 35-39 are relatively adjacent the clip edges which are opposite web 13.

If desired, screws or the like may be employed instead of the illustrated nails. However, it has been found that nails are highly satisfactory and economical, and that they do not vibrate out of position since the tension of the Wire 15 tends to locks the nails in place.

OPERATION Let it be assumed that deflection of beam 17 (FIG- URE 1) has lowered the T-sectioned support element 19 until the acoustical panels 22 sag in an undesired manner. It is then merely necessary for an operator to insert nails 26 and 28 through holes 27 and 30, and then move the sheet metal clip to such position that the wire is straddled as illustrated in FIGURE 4. Thereafter, nail 29 is inserted through holes 31, and the screwdriver tip is inserted into the socket formed by the elements 13a and 26. As shown in FIGURE 5, the screwdriver is preferably oriented in such manner that one edge of the tip bears against the shank of nail 26, whereas the base portion of the opposite edge of the tip bears against the end 13a of web 13.

It is then merely necessary for an operator grasping the handle of the screwdriver to move the same downwardly in the manner of a crank and thus effect rotation (or torqueing) of the clip about a horizontal axis until the nails 28 and 29 form bends in the Wire 15. Such rotation is continued until the resulting shortening of the wire 15 elevates the support 19 and thus causes the ceiling panels 22 to be in the level position desired (or slightly above such level positionto compensate for the reverse bending indicated below).

The operator continues to hold the screwdriver handle and thus maintain the requisite bends in the wire adjacent nails 28 and 29, the portion of the wire above nail 29 then passing near one of the sets of holes 32-43 (depending upon the degree of bending of the wire). The operator then inserts the locking nail 44 through the hole set which is adjacent the wire, and is also between the wire and the screwdriver, for example the hole set 35 as indicated in FIGURES 2 and 5.

Thereafter, the operator releases the pressure on the screwdriver and withdraws the screwdriver from the socket. The weight of the ceiling normally causes clip rotation in the reverse direction until an additional bend is formed in the wire around the locking nail 44. The three nails 28, 29 and 44 thus form a permanent kink in the wire and, furthermore, are themselves held in posi tion (against longitudinal displacement due to vibration or other factors) due to the pressure (resulting from the weight of the ceiling) exerted by the wire against the shanks of the nails. If the ceiling weight is relatively small at the wire being shortened, it may be necessary to pull downwardly on the lower wire portion in order to form the bend around nail 44.

The operation is then repeated at other Wires in the ceiling construction, namely at all regions where sagging has ocurred. As shown in FIGURE 6, a wire 15a is provided at a ceiling portion wherein the degree of sagging has been relatively extreme. The amount of turning effected by the screwdriver is then caused to be much greater, and the locking nail 44 is inserted through a hole set 40 relatively adjacent the bottom edges of the face portions 11 and 12. It follows that the kink formed in the wire is much larger than in the situation shown in FIG- URE 5, so that the amount of raising of the support 19 and associated ceiling elements 22 is greater.

The holes 31 (and nail 29 contained therein) are off center, as above stated, being relatively close to holes 27. Stated otherwise, holes 31 are closer to holes 27 (nail 26) than is the center of the arcuate row formed by holes 32-43. This permits formation of large kinks (FIGURE 6) in order to raise the associated ceiling portion a substantial amount.

The foregoing detailed description is to be clearly understood as given by way of illustration and example only, the spirit and scope of this invention being limited solely by the appended claims.

What is claimed is: 1. A clip device for adjustment of suspended ceilings, which comprises:

first and second spaced and substantially parallel face elements,

one edge of said first element being fixedly connected to the corresponding edge of said second face element, means of said face elements to form a socket adapted to receive the tip of a hand tool, first bearing means provided on said face elements for bearing engagement with a ceiling-suspending wire, second bearing means provided on said face elements for bearing engagement with said wire,

said second bearing means being spaced from said first bearing means, and locking means provided on said face elements for bearing engagement with said wire after rotation of said connected face elements by said hand tool,

said locking means cooperating with said first and second bearing means to form a kink in said wire and thus shorten the same. 2. The invention as claimed in claim 1, in which said face elements are spaced apart by a distance at least equal to the diameter of said wire, and in which said corresponding edges of said face elements are connected to each other by means of an integral web.

3. The invention as claimed in claim 2, in which said socket-forming means comprises one end of said web, and also comprises an elongated element inserted through holes provided in said face elements adjacent corresponding edges of said face elements and in spaced relationship from said web end, the spacing between said web end and said elongated element being sufficient to receive the end of a screwdriver or the like.

4. The invention as claimed in claim 3, in which said first bearing means comprises an elongated element extended through corresponding holes which are provided in said face elements adjacent corresponding edge portions thereof and near the end of said web which is remote from said one end thereof.

5. The invention as claimed in claim 4, in which said second bearing means comprises an elongated element extended through holes which are provided in the central regions of said face elements.

6. The invention as claimed in claim 1, in which said locking means comprises a generally arcuately-arranged row of openings provided in said face elements and adapted selectively to receive an elongated bearing element, the opening in which said bearing element is received depending upon the degree of rotation of said face elements in order that the size of said kink may be varied.

7. The invention as claimed in claim 6, in which said second bearing means in disposed in off-center relationship relative to said arcuately-arranged row of openings.

8. The invention as claimed in claim 1, in which said face elements comprise pieces of sheet metal correspond ing edges of which are connected to each other by means of an integral web, in which said first and second bearing means and said locking means comprise nails inserted through openings in said face elements, and in which said socket-forming means comprises a nail inserted through holes in said face elements relatively adjacent one end of said Web, the spacing between said last-mentioned nail and said one web end being sufiicient to re ceive the tip of a screwdriver or the like.

9. The invention as claimed in claim 8, in which said locking means comprises a substantial number of holes spaced from said second bearing means and adapted selectively to receive a nail, said holes forming said locking means being generally arcuately arranged.

10. The invention as claimed in claim 9, in which said second bearing means is off center relative to the arcuatelyarranged holes forming said locking means, being closer to said one web end than is the center of the are formed by said arcuately-arranged holes.

11. The invention as claimed in claim 1, in which said clip device is provided in combination with said wire in a ceiling construction which is suspended from a support in a building, said ceiling construction further comprising support means adapted to support edge portions of acoustical panels or the like.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS STEPHEN J. NOVOSAD, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3707022 *Sep 23, 1970Dec 26, 1972Diehl AlanTie down clamp
US4446818 *Jun 1, 1982May 8, 1984Chore-Time Equipment, Inc.Hanger for conveyor tubes and the like
US6588759 *Jul 18, 2000Jul 8, 2003Action Target, Inc.Target baffle bracket
US7653979Jul 20, 2007Feb 2, 2010Action Target Inc.Method for forming ballistic joints
US7775526Jul 26, 2006Aug 17, 2010Action Target Inc.Bullet trap
US7793937Oct 13, 2008Sep 14, 2010Action Target Inc.Bullet trap
US8091896Jul 2, 2010Jan 10, 2012Action Target Inc.Bullet trap
US8128094Jul 2, 2010Mar 6, 2012Action Target Inc.Bullet trap
US8276916Jul 20, 2007Oct 2, 2012Action Target Inc.Support for bullet traps
US8469364May 7, 2007Jun 25, 2013Action Target Inc.Movable bullet trap
US8485529Nov 22, 2011Jul 16, 2013Action Target Inc.Bullet trap
US8827273Jul 22, 2011Sep 9, 2014Action Target Inc.Clearing trap
US20130068910 *Sep 16, 2011Mar 21, 2013David Nicholas Lloyd HowellTechnical field and industrial applicability of the invention
WO2001069043A1 *Nov 21, 2000Sep 20, 2001Tomarco Contractor SpecialtiesSeismic cable attachment assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/71.1, 248/328, 52/83, 242/388.2, 248/343, 24/909
International ClassificationE04B9/20
Cooperative ClassificationE04B9/20, Y10S24/909
European ClassificationE04B9/20