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Publication numberUS3510032 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 5, 1970
Filing dateJul 13, 1967
Priority dateJul 13, 1967
Publication numberUS 3510032 A, US 3510032A, US-A-3510032, US3510032 A, US3510032A
InventorsCarver Paige E
Original AssigneeCarver Paige E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Necktie assistant
US 3510032 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1970 P. E. CARVER 3,510,032

' NECKTIE ASSISTANT Filed July 15, 1967 [/VVE/VTOB Paqq' e E Char/en B) United States Patent US. Cl. 223-411 12 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A necktie assistant which is independent of any index mark or other indicia affixed to the necktie and also is independent of the users shirt button as a gaging means. The necktie assistant includes a measuring rod having a hook on the upper end for engaging the users shirt collar. The measuring rod depends along the front of the users shirt and the lower end of the rod is provided with scaled indicia for use in measuring and recording the proper length of the inward end portion of the necktie prior to tying the necktie knot. A sliding index member can be slidably mounted on the rod for cooperation with the scaled indicia or for denoting the proper position directly of the inward or small end of the necktie prior to tying.

The present invention relates to novel means for assisting the user in properly tying a necktie or the like, and more particularly to such means which can be adjusted in a novel fashion to accommodate the necktie assisting means to differing sizes of neckties and to different sizes of users of the necktie assistant.

The commonly used method for gaging the free length of the smaller or inner end portion of the necktie when tying the necktie, involves the use of one of the users shirt buttons. The user drapes the necktie about his neck and extends the inner free end thereof downwardy to a preselected one of his shirt buttons. Purportedly the free inner length of the necktie prior to commencement of the tying is thus established. This rather cr-ude method is not very satisfactory in most cases inasmuch as the lengths of neckties differ depending upon the style and the manufacture. In addition, the elevation of a given button on the users shirt also varies owing to variations in shirt button spacing and in size and type of the shirt, as dictated by the brand of a given shirt.

Accordingly the tying of neckties is largely a matter of trial and error. Frequently the wearer must retie the necktie several times in order to achieve the proper proportions of the free end thereof in order to present a stylish appearance. If neckties were of a standardized length, the wearer in time might develop a sense of proportion as to the proper length of the inward end portion before tying the necktie knot, however, the lengths of neckties vary considerably from manufacturer to manufacturer during a given style period. Necktie lengths moreover vary from year to year in general with yearly style changes. Even if all neckties were or could be made of a standard length differing thicknesses of material resulting in differing knot sizes would dictate differences in length of the inward end portions prior to tying. Thus, some means for precisely gaging the free inward length of the necktie prior to tying the necktie knot are highly desirable.

In the past various attempts have been made to provide suitable means for assisting the tying of neckties in a manner to secure the proper free lengths thereof. For example, Pinsuti Pat. No. 2,385,726 discloses a series of slits in the lining material of the necktie to facilitate shaping the knot. While the slits may aid to some extent in locating the necktie knot, it requires means to be installed Patented May 5, 1970 ice on every necktie by the manufacturer, which is not likely to occur. Rhein Pat. No. 2,499,260 utilizes a pair of indictators suitably spaced from each end of the necktie and placed on the back surfaces thereof. In use, the wearer aligns the indicating means to a given horizotnal level in order to position the necktie for tying. The Rhein arrangement suffers from the same disadvantages as that noted for the previously mentioned patent. A somewhat similar arrangement is shown in Minters Pat. No. 3,025,- 528 which employs a single indicating member positioned on the back surface of 'the tie and removed from one of the ends thereof. The last mentioned prior arrangement also requires an addition to each necktie manufactured to be of any practical value.

De Jean Pat. No. 3,271,780 discloses the use of a measuring strip, movable indicia, or a mark secured to the back of the necktie, all of which are intended to cooperate with one of the users shirt buttons to pre-position the necktie prior to tying the knot. The disadvantages of employing a shirt button as a gage for necktie lengths has been pointed out previously. The De Jean arrangement in addition suffers from the disadvantages pointed out in connection with the previously mentioned patents.

Moreover all of the prior devices and practices proposed for utilizing and asisting the tying of neckties failed to take into consideration differing neck sizes of users and individual preferences in tight or loose shirt collar sizes, in tight or loose necktie knots, and the like.

I overcome these disadvantages of the prior art by providing a necktie assistant which is fabricated independently of the necktie itself and which more importantly is adjustable to adapt the necktie assistant to various sizes and styles of neckties and to different sizes of users of the necktie assistant. My novel necktie assistant does not entail the addition of any index mark or other indicia to the necktie itself nor does it depend on the location of individual shirt buttons or the like. Moreover, my novel necktie assistant is arranged to take into consideration individual preferences of the user in tightness or looseness of the dress shirt collar or of the necktie knot.

I accomplished these desirable results by providing means for assisting the tying of neckties, said means comprising an elongated measuring rod, shirt collar engaged means on one end of said rod, and necktie length indicating means on said rod adjacent the other end thereof.

It also desirably provides necktie assisting means wherein said length indicating means includes scale indicia on said other rod end portion.

It also desirably provides necktie assisting means wherein said length indicating means includes a slider movable along the length of said measuring rod and means forming part of said slider for frictionally engaging said rod.

It also desirably provides necktie assisting means wherein said frictional engagement means is a spring clip having a necktie length gage plate mounted transversely thereon.

It also desirably provides necktie assisting means wherein said measuring rod is provided with scale indicia recessed into the surface thereof, and said frictionally engaging means includes means for engaging said scale indicia to index said slider along the length of said measuring rod.

During the foregoing discussion, various objects features and advantages of the invention have been set forth. These and other objects, features and advantages of the invention together with structural details thereof will be elaborated upon during the forthcoming description of presently preferred embodiments of the invention and presently preferred methods of practicing the same.

In the accompanying drawings I have shown certain presently preferred embodiments of the invention and have 3,5 3 illustrated certain presently preferred methods of practicing the same wherein:

FIG. 1 is perspective view illustrating the use of my novel necktie assistant, arranged in accord with my invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged side elevational view of the necktie assistant shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a partial rear elevational view of the apparatus as shown in FIG. 2 and partially broken away to show a feature of the invention more clearly.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the apparatus as shown in FIG. 3 and taken along reference line IVIV thereof.

FIG. 5 is a similar view, with parts removed, showing a modified slider arrangement forming part of the necktie assistant.

FIG. 6 is a front elevational view of another form of necktie assistant arranged in accordance with my invention.

FIG. 7 is a partial, side elevational view of the apparatus as shown in FIG. 6 and taken along reference line VII- VII of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view of the apparatus as shown in FIG. 6 and taken along reference line VIII VIII thereof.

FIG. 9 is a side elevational view with parts removed, of still another form of my novel necktie assistant.

Referring now more particularly to FIGS. 1-4 of the drawings the illustrative form of the invention shown therein comprises a necktie assistant 10 having an elongated measuring rod 12 having a hook 14 at the top thereof for fitting over a buttoned shirt collar at the throat of the wearer as better shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. To protect the wearer from any sharp edges or the like associated with hook end 16, a protective cap or guard 18 is slipped over the hook end 16. A similar cap 20 is slipped over lower end 22 of the measuring rod 12 to protect portions of the wearers shirt and/ or necktie which may come into contact with the lower end 22.

At least the lower portion of the measuring rod 12 is desirably provided with a series of index marks 24, preferably spaced at regular intervals along the length of the measuring rod 12 to aid in the use of the necktie assistant 10. As better shown in FIG. 1, prior to tying the necktie 26, the inner or smaller end portion 28 thereof is laid along the measuring rod 12 and the proper length thereof is determined by use of the scale or indicia 24. To facilitate measurement of the inner end portion 28 the scale 24 may be divided into inches and fractional inches as denoted in FIG. 2. Then, with a measurement being previously established for each necktie or group of neckties of a given length, that necktie or group of neckties such as the necktie 26 can be subsequently tied without trail and error by using the necktie assistant 10.

With the arrangement as shown, the necktie assistant 10 is independent of any index means provided on the necktie 26, nor does it depend upon the location of one of the users shirt buttons.

Although the hooked measuring rod 12 and the protective end caps 18, 20 are shown as separate items, it is contemplated that the measuring rod and rounded ends thereof provided by the caps 18, 20 can be molded in one piece as described hereinafter in connection with FIG. 9. The latter arrangement is particularly desirable where the measuring rod 12 is made from a readily available plastic material.

If desired the scale 24 can be dispensed with and an adjustable slider mechanism 30 can be utilized instead to determine the length of the inner necktie end portion 28. Alternatively, the scale and sliding mechanism can be employed cooperately for setting measurements for several ties of differing overall lengths. Thus, slider 30, which is frictionally engaged with the rod 12 as described in detail hereinafter, can 'be moved along the length of the rod 12 to an elevation such as that shown in FIGS. 1, 2

or 6 where the lower inner end 32 of the necktie 26 is properly positioned prior to tying. The lower end cap 20 additionally prevents inadvertent removal of the slider 30 from the rod 12.

'Desirably the slider is provided with suitable tightening means such as knurled nut 34 which threadedly engages threaded stud 36 on the slider 30 as better shown in FIG. 4. In this arrangement the stud 36 includes an expanded inner end 38 which is entrapped in a complementary drawn apertured portion 40 of top plates 42 of the slider 30. The edges of the top plate 42 as better shown in FIG. 3 are crimped over the adjacent edges of lower slider plate 44 which is provided with a channeled portion 46 closely receiving the measuring rod 12. As better shown in FIG. 3 the enlarged end of the thus pivotably mounted screw 36 is provided with one or more grooves 48 which can be aligned with the channel portion 46. When so aligned measuring rod 12 can be readily pushed through the channel portion 46. However, tightening of the knurled adjustment nut 34 rotates screw 36 slightly to mis-align the associated groove 48 with the channel portion 46 to clamp the adjacent portion of the measuring rod 12 therebetween.

An alternative arrangement of the slider is shown in FIG. 5 of the drawing. In the latter arrangement, the slider 30 includes screw 50 secured to lower plate 44' of the slider 30', as by spot welding or brazing at either side of its channel 46 as denoted by reference characters 52. The area of the upper plate 42' need not be extruded adjacent its aperture 40' and screw 50 can freely pass therethrough, save for its securance to lower plate 44' as aforesaid. Before the screw 50 is secured to bottom plate 44' its inward portion desirably is bifurcated or otherwise provided with a longitudinally extending slit on notch 54. Threads 56 of screw 50 are desirably tapered so that tightening of a suitable adjustment nut (not shown in FIG. 5) such as the nut 34 of FIG. 4 tends to move the bifurcate inner ends 58 of screw 50 together and thereby tightening channel 46' about the adjacent portion of the measuring rod 12 to clamp the slider 30 thereof.

Referring now to FIGS. 6-8 of the drawings another arrangement of my novel necktie assistant 10 is disclosed therein. In the latter modification of my invention measuring rod 12' may or may not be provided with a measuring scale such as that shown in FIG. 2 of the drawings, depending upon whether a slider is used thereon or whether a scale is desired in conjunction with the slider when employed thereon. The alternative or co-operative use of the scale 24 applies also to FIGS. 15. FIGS. 68 illustrate another modification of the slider 30, which in certain forms thereof co-operates in a unique manner with the measuring rod 12. Thus, as better shown in FIG. 6 slider 30" includes a spring clip 60 having a transverse slit 67 therein preferably on the side of the clip 60 away from hook 14' as better shown in FIG. 7 for the reason mentioned below. Spring clip 60 is provided with a first measuring rod engaging portion 62 which is intermediate its looped and apertured end portions 64. Additional measuring rod engaging portions 66 are also disposed between the ends of the spring clip 60 (on the other side of the rod 12) adjacent each side respectively of its transverse slit 67. A gage plate 68 is secured to the spring clip 60 as by soldering or brazing or the like and the junction therebetween is stabilized by inserting a projection 70 of the inward edge of the gage plate 68 a short distance into the slit 67 of the spring clip 60. The measuring rod engaging portions 62 and 66 of the spring clip 60 preferably are laterally spaced so that a frictional engagement between the measuring rod 12 and the rod-engaging surfaces 62 and 66 of the clip 60 is preserved by the end loops 64 of the spring clip. Thus, the slider 30 is resistantly moved along the measuring rod 12 to determine the proper length of inner tie portion 28 in the same manner as noted previously in connection with sliders 30 and 30'. When moving the slider 30" side'wise swinging and release of the necktie inner or small end 32 (FIG. 1) is prevented by upwardly bent wings 69 (FIG. 6) of the gage plate 68.

In accordance with another arrangement of my novel necktie assistant 10' the scale indicia 24' desirably are recessed into the material of the measuring rod 12 as 'better shown in FIGS. 6 and 7. In co-operation with the indicia 24', which may include intermediate half-inch markings 24" also recessed, the inwardly projecting edge 70 of the gage plate 68 projects through the slider slit 67 and slightly inwardly of the adjacent measuring rod engaging portions 66 of the spring clip 60. Thus, as the slider 30" is moved along the length of the measuring rod 12 the inner edge 70 of the gage plate 68 snaps into a given one of the recessed indicia 24' or 24" to position the gage plate 68 in alignment therewith so that the slider can be indexed along that length of the measuring rod 12' on which the measuring indicia are thus provided.

From the foregoing it will be seen that novel necktie assistant means have been disclosed herein which do not require any index mark or other attachment to be secured to individual neckties of the user and which are independent of the position of shirt buttons or the like. Moreover, my novel necktie assistant such as the assistant 10 or 10' can be installed on the shirt of the user and manipulated after the top or collar button thereof is fastened so that my necktie assistant is independent of the neck size of the wearer and also of the tightness or looseness of the collar fit which the wearer may prefer. My novel necktie assistants do not require any modification in either the necktie itself or in the shirt selected by the user. It is constructed to prevent wearing engagement with the users clothing particularly with the necktie and the shirt and also to prevent abrasion or other injury to the users skin particularly at the collar hook 14.

When the measuring rod 12 is molded with integral rounded ends from a plastic material, it is contemplated that the measuring rod such as the rod 12" in FIG. 9 can be provided with a rounded lower end 72 so as not to increase the diameter of the measuring rod 12", when one of the aforementioned sliders or equivalent is to be slipped thereon. Measuring rod 12" can be provided with a similar end portion adjacent its hooked end 14" or with a balled end 74 as shown.

From the foregoing it will the apparent that novel and efficient forms of necktie assistant have been described herein. While I have shown and described certain presently preferred embodiments of the invention and have illustrated presently preferred methods of practicing the same it is to be distinctly understood that the invention is not limited thereto but may be variously embodied and practiced within the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. Means for assisting the tying of neckties, said means comprising an elongated measuring rod, shirt collar engaging means on one end of said rod, said engaging means being shaped to fit closely over a buttoned shirt collar and to depend said rod therefrom, said rod being shaped to depend along the central front area of said shirt, and necktie length indicating means on the other end thereof.

2. The combination according to claim 1 wherein the ends of said rod are provided with abrasion reducing cap members respectively.

3. The combination according to claim 1 wherein said length indicating means includes scale indicia on said other rod end portion.

4. The combination according to claim 1 wherein said length indicating means includes a slider movable along the length of said measuring rod, and closely fitted relative to at least that side of said rod from which said collar engaging means extend, and means forming part of said slider for frictionally engaging said rod.

5. The combination according to claim 4 wherein said frictionally engaging means include a screw clamp arrangement mounted on said slider at a side of said rod generally opposite from said collar engaging means side, said clamp arrangement being positioned to denote said necktie length.

6. The combination according to claim 4 wherein said frictionally engaging means is a spring clip having a necktie length gage plate mounted transversely thereon.

7. The combination according to claim 6 wherein said spring clip is provided with a transversely extending slit and said plate is closely fitted into said slit.

8. The combination according to claim 7 wherein said measuring rod is provided with scale indicia recessed into the surface thereof, and said gauge plate includes an edge portion projecting through said slit and inwardly of said spring clip for resilient and indexing engagement in said recessed indicia as said spring clip is slid along said measuring rod.

9. The combination according to claim 4 wherein said slider includes a channeled portion closely fitted about said measuring rod, screw adjustment means on said slider and including a threaded stud having bifurcate inner end portions secured respectively to opposed sides of said channel, and tapped member threadedly engaged with said stud for moving said bifurcate portions toward one another when said tapped member is tightened on said stud to tighten said channel portion about said measuring rod, said tapped member being positioned to denote said necktie length.

10. The combination according to claim 4 wherein said measuring rod is provided with scale indicia recessed into the surface thereof, and said frictionally engaging means includes means for resilient insertion into said recessed scale indicia to index said slider along the length of said measuring rod.

11. The combination according to claim 6 wherein said gage plate is provided with upwardly bent wing portions adjacent the ends thereof respectively.

12. The combination according to claim 4 wherein said collar engaging means are provided with an abrasion reducing cap member, and means are provided on said other rod end for retaining said slide on said rod.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 649,011 5/ 1900 Szafka.

865,137 9/1907 Wallen. 1,390,340 9/1921 Carlson 33-15 1,655,239 1/ 1928 Priputnevich 33-165 1,856,149 5/1932 Ball 248-411 2,122,868 7/1938 Morgan 248-408 XR 2,913,790 11/ 1959 Meisen 24-124 3,019,504 2/ 1962 Castagliuolo 24-124 XR 3,348,745 10/ 1967 Basile et al. 223-92 XR MERVIN STEIN, Primary Examiner G. H. KRIZMANICH, Assistant Examiner UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,510,032 May 5, 1970 Paige E. Carver It is certified that error appears in the above identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 2, line 5, "horizotnal" should read horizontal line 25, "asisting" should read assisting line 63, "objects" should read objects, Column 3, line 52, "trail" should read trial Column 4, line 9, "plates" should read plate Column 5, line 59, after "on" insert said rod adjacent Column 6, line 49, "slide" should read slider Signed and sealed this 5th day of January 1971.

(SEAL) Attest:

WILLIAM E. SCHUYLER, JR.

Edward M. Fletcher, Jr.

Commissioner of Patents Attesting Officer

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US649011 *Aug 3, 1899May 8, 1900Joseph SzafkaSurface-gage.
US865137 *Sep 1, 1906Sep 3, 1907Nannie L WallenShower-bath apparatus.
US1390340 *Sep 18, 1920Sep 13, 1921Carlson John CDevice for indicating the length and hang of coat-sleeves
US1655239 *Sep 26, 1925Jan 3, 1928Alexander PriputnevichHeight gauge
US1856149 *Aug 2, 1930May 3, 1932Howard BallCollapsible scaffold
US2122868 *Jun 1, 1937Jul 5, 1938American Seating CoClamp
US2913790 *Jan 19, 1955Nov 24, 1959Johann MeisenCable clamp
US3019504 *Apr 29, 1959Feb 6, 1962Burroughs CorpTape and terminal fitting assembly
US3348745 *Mar 30, 1965Oct 24, 1967Basile Concetta AGarment hanger with end loading slot
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5326004 *Oct 13, 1992Jul 5, 1994Daily Jr Ralph DNecktie positioning device
US5601318 *Oct 12, 1995Feb 11, 1997Rusing; Robert M.Necktie knot tying device
WO2002065865A1 *Jan 17, 2002Aug 29, 2002Dubief LaurentPosition-finding method for positioning a necktie
Classifications
U.S. Classification223/111
International ClassificationA41D25/00, A41D25/08
Cooperative ClassificationA41D25/08, A41D25/00
European ClassificationA41D25/00, A41D25/08