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Publication numberUS3510386 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 5, 1970
Filing dateJun 23, 1966
Priority dateJun 23, 1966
Also published asDE1560699A1, DE1957731U
Publication numberUS 3510386 A, US 3510386A, US-A-3510386, US3510386 A, US3510386A
InventorsBritt Robert C, Goins Robert E
Original AssigneeGaf Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Antistatic carpet structure
US 3510386 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 5, I970 R. E. soms ETAL 3,510,386

ANTISTATIC CARPET STRUCTURE Filed June 23, 1966 Fibrous Pile 'q/l////////////l/%//////////% Antisiutic Layer 5 Primary Backing Polymeric Bucking Layer Secondary Backing (optional) Robert E. Goins Robert C. Brit! IN V EN TORS ATTORNEYS United States Patent Oflice 3,510,386 ANTISTATIC CARPET STRUCTURE Robert E. Goins and Robert C. Britt, Chattanooga, Tenn.,

assignors, by mesne assignments, to GAF Corporation,

a corporation of Delaware Filed June 23, 1966, Ser. No. 559,883

Int. Cl. Dc 17/02 US. Cl. 161-66 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Antistatic textile products, particularly those having a pile type structure on one side of a woven layer, such as carpets, are produced by applying to one side only (e.g., the woven side rather than the pile side in the case of carpets), an antistatic composition consisting essentially of a mixture of (a) an organic textile antistatic agent,

(b) a humectant which may be either an ionic humectant,

such as glycerin, or a nonionic humectant such as calcium chloride, and

(c) when said humectant is a nonionic humectant, an electrolyte such as calcium chloride or sodium chloride and applying a polymeric backing coating over the antistatic layer, whereby the antistatic layer is disposed between the fibrous textile layer and the polymeric backing layer.

This invention is concerned with an antistatic carpet structure. More specifically this invention relates to an antistatic carpet structure which has a fibrous layer, an antistatic, conductive coating, and a polymeric backing.

Conventional carpet structures are capable of generating and transferring substantial charges of static electricity. These charges of static electricity are created when persons in contact with the dielectric fibrous layer of the carpet move over said fibrous layer. The charge per se is created by the movement of dielectric shoe components which are in contact with the dielectric fibrous layer. These charges are then transferred to the wearer of the shoe. When the wearer subsequently becomes grounded, the accumulated charge discharges through that part of the individuals body which is in contact with the ground. This discharge procedure can result in severe discomfort for the individual. The above described problem can be eliminated if the charges of static electricity can be dispersed throughout the carpet structure, and subsequently dissipated into the air.

The prior art discloses a plurality of antistatic compositions and one antistatic carpet structure. In this antistatic carpet structure of US. Pat. 2,302,003, Cadwell et al., accumulated charges are dispersed via a plurality of conducting fibers which are positioned throughout the fibrous layer. In contrast the carpet structure of this invention disperses, quickly and thoroughly, charges of static electricity without the need of specific conducting fibers. The carpet structure of this invention bleeds olf charges of static electricity via a critical conducting layer. The con- 3,510,386 Patented May 5, 1970 tinuous conducting layer of the subject carpet structure must be such that it is capable of bleeding and dispersing charges of static electricity. However, said antistatic layer must not be of such a thickness that it interferes with the aesthetic qualities of the carpet.

'Ihe antistatic carpet structure of this invention incorporates a polymeric backing. The vast majority of the prior art antistatic compositions are not compatible with polymeric backings. Because of this incompatibility carpets which are treated with these prior art antistatic compositions could not utilize most polymeric backings, and par ticularly the commonly used natural latex backing. In contrast the antistatic coating of this composition as utilized in the carpet structure of this invention is compatible with natural latex backings and most other polymeric coating compounds. Therefore, the antistatic carpet structure of this invention can utilize a latex backing.

The subject antistatic carpet structure is illustrated in the single figure of the accompanying drawing. The carpet structure 2 has a conventional fibrous layer 4 which can be woven, tufted, knitted, flocked or other structure usual in carpets. This fibrous layer can be composed of any of the usual textile fibers or blends or mixtures thereof employed in carpet manufacture, such as wool, polyamides (e.g. nylon 66 and nylon 6), cotton, polyolefins (particularly polypropylene), acrylics, modacrylics, polyesters, etc. The fibrous layer 4 is woven in, tufted through, or in some other manner aflixed to a backing layer 5, usually a woven fabric of cotton or jute, although other fibers and types of construction can be employed for the backing thereof. The basic carpet structure may be any carpet manufacture, such as the well known tufted, Brussels, Wilton, Axminster, chenille, velvet, flocked, knit etc. In accordance with the present invention the underside of the fibrous or pile layer 4 with its primary backing 5 to which the fiber forming pile is afiixed or through which it is tufted, etc., is coated with an antistatic coating 6 which provides a uniform continuous layer and coats and contacts the backing and the ends of the fibers forming the pile in contact therewith. The amount of material applied as such antistatic coating should be suflicient to substantially penetrate the backing and that part of the fibers in contact therewith, but preferably should not be applied in such a manner or such an amount as to extend to the face of the fibrous (pile) layer 4, less it detract from the aesthetic properties of the fibrous layer. Normally from .01 to 12 ounces per square yard and preferably from 0.5 to 3.0 ounces per square yard of the antistatic coating is applied.

The antistatic coating composition employed for the antistatic coating layer 6 consists essentially of a mixture of a textile antistatic agent and a humectant in proportions of about 4 to 8 parts by weight of antistatic agent and 10 to 50 parts by weight of humecant. There is also preferably included from 0.1 to about 1 part by weight of a nonionic or cationic type wetting agent to assist in the penetration of the antistatic composition into the textile substrate. It is desirable to add the wetting agent in controlled amount (determined by preliminary test) to thereby control the degree of penetration of the composition into the textile substrate so that the antistatic coating composition penetrates the backing of the carpet and wets the base of the pile fabric, but does not penetrate to the outer tips of the pile. It is also preferable to incorporate in the coating composition from about 0.1 to about 1 part by weight of an electrolyte, particularly if the humectant employed is nonionic in character or is only weakly ionic, i.e. has a relatively low dissociation constant. The antistatic coating 6 is preferably applied in the form of an aqueous solution or dispersion, although other solvents or liquid dispersing mediums may be employed if desired and in the case of aqueous solutions or dispersions, volatile water-soluble solvents, such as lower aliphatic alcohols of 1 to 4 carbon atoms, acetone and the like, may be included to facilitate drying of the antistatic layer following its application.

After the antistatic coating 6 has been applied to the back of the carpet, a polymeric backing layer 8 is then applied to the carpet and forms an essential element of the carpet structure of this, application. This polymeric backing layer is preferably applied in the form of an aqueous dispersion (latex) and is preferably a known compounded natural rubber latex or compounded carboxylated butadiene-styrene rubber latex, commonly employed as latex backing for carpetings, although other polymeric coatings, such as polystyrene, vinylidene chloride, polyacrylates, butadiene styrene rubbers and the like may be employed. As examples of known natural compounded rubber latices which are commercially available may be mentioned: Lotol GX-3180, U.S. Rubber Company, and Burkote R1732, Burkart-Schier Chemical Company, compounded carboxylated styrene butadiene rubber latices such as Lotol GX-1314, U.S. Rubber Company and Burkote A2223, Burkart-Schier Chemical Company, or compounded neoprene latices, such as Lotol GX-1076, U.S. Rubber Company and Burkote R2285, Burkart-Schier Chemical Company.

While the exact reasons for the antistatic properties of the carpet structure of the present invention are not fully understood, it appears that the polymeric coating 8 serves the function of holding the antistatic coating layer 6 in place. Charges of static electricity built up in the pile 4 are dispersed throughout the entire carpet area by antistatic layer 6 and subsequently bled off into the ground or atmosphere. In order to assist bleeding suchcharges to the ground, the polymeric coating 8 may have incorporated in it a material such as carbon black or any agent which will lower the dielectric properties of the polymeric layer.

A number of preferred compositions for the antistatic coating layer 6 of the carpet structure of the present invention are disclosed in the copending application of Andrew Kelly and Robert C. Britt entitled Antistatic Composition and Process, Ser. No. 559,859, filed June 23, 1966 concurrently with this application. We particularly prefer those antistatic compositions disclosed in said copending application in which potassium formate is employed as humectant since it has been found that not only is potassium formate particularly effective as a humectant in such coating compositions, but compositions containing the same are compatible with the latex backings normally used on carpets, and specifically overcome premature coagulation or gelling of latex backing based on natural compounded rubber, thus not interfering with good bonding of thelatex coating with the carpet backing. ,"On..the, other hand, the antistatic coatings containing calcium chloride are incompatible with certain known latex coatings which have been used as carpet backings in that they cause premature coagulation or gelling of the late): with resultant poor adhesion of the latex to the carpet backing so that in the case of loosely woven or tufted carpets, the latex does not function satisfactorily to hold the tufts in place.

While antistatic layers based on the antistatic compositions of the above mentioned copending application are particularly preferred, it will be understood that we may employ any antistatic layer based on any known antistatic "material suitable for textiles which will disperse charges of static electricity. Such agents are normally nitrogen containing or carboxylic'containingorganic antistatic agents and as examples thereof may be mentioned the following compounds:

Burkester R1499'-lauric acid polyethylene glycol ester.

Amine oxides or quaternary ammonium salts of vinyl pyrrolidone-dimethylamino-ethylmethacrylate copolymers.

Vinyl pyrrolidone-acrylamine copolymers-such as a copolymer of 75% vinyl pyrrolidone and 25% acrylamide.

Zelec DPlauryl alcohol phosphate.

Catanac SNstearylamidopropyl dimethyl-fi-hydroxyethyl ammonium nitrate.

Ethoquad C/ 12 polyoxyethylated monium salt.

Phosphonamide sulfonate of an alcohol ethoxylate, i.e. a product of the formula quaternary amwherein R represents the hydrocarbon residue of an alkanol (such as'Alfol 1412) and n represents an integer of 8 to 30.

Partial esters of the copolymer of vinyl methyl ether and maleic anhydride with nonionic surface active agents-described in French Pat. No. 1,360,209.

Phosphate esters of the type described in U.S. Pats. 3,004,056 and 3,004,057 and Belgian Pat. 641,097.

Triesters of phosphoric acid and ethoxylated aliphatic alcohol such as the phosphate triester of lauryl alcohol condensed with 4 moles of ethylene oxide or of dodecyl alcohol condensed with about 2 moles of ethylene oxide.

Polyglycol 4000.

Sucrose octa-acetate.

Polyethoxy amides of stearic and oleic acid.

Methyl diethanolamine ethoxylate.

Ethoxylated 2,3,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyne-4,7-diol.

Polyoxyethylenemono-oleate.

Lauryl trimethyl ammonium chloride.

Undecylimidazolone.

Lauryl dimethylbenzyl ammonium chloride.

Polyoxyethyl stearyl ammonium chloride.

Oleic-monoisopropanol amide.

Vinyl acetate/styrene/acrylic acid polymers.

Ethoxylated diamines.

Long chain amine oxides.

Hydroxybutyramides.

Quaternized polymers of vinylpyridine.

Quaternized copolymers of vinylpyridine and vinylpyrrolidone.

We particularly prefer antistatic layers based on alkoxylated tertiary amines represented by the following general formula:

wherein R represents an aliphatic hydrocarbon radical of from about 8 to about 22 carbon atoms, each R represents hydrogen or methyl and n represents an average integer of at least 1, preferably 1 to about 30, although higher alkoxylated derivatives, i.e. the products obtained by condensing 1 molar proportion of a primary aliphatic (saturated or unsaturated) amine with up to 50 molar proportions of an alkylene oxide, usually ethylene oxide,

may be employed if desired. Such alkoxylated amines are well known in the art and are'prepared by condensing the primary saturated or unsaturated aliphatic amine of from 8 to 22 carbon atoms, with an alkylene oxide, usually ethylene oxide, although propyene oxide and butylene oxide may be employed if desired, until glycol groups of desired chain length are obtained. Such products have been disclosed, for example in US. Pats. 1,970,578, 2,174,762, 2,510,284 and 2,593,466.

As a humectant in the composition of the present invention there may be used various deliquescent salts of metals of the Groups I and II, Periodic Table, particularly of the alkali metal and alkaline earth metals. Specific deliquescent salts which we prefer to employ as humectant, include the alkali metal salts of lower aliphatic carboxylic acids, such as sodium formate, potassium formate, lithium formate, cesium formate, sodium and potassium acetate, potassium butyrate and mineral acid salts like calcium chloride. There may also be used such organic humectants as glycerol, urea, ethylene glycol, sorbitol, ethoxylated sorbitol, lauric acid esters and mixtures of the same.

. It will be apparent that Where a deliquescent salt is employed as the humectant, it may also function as an electrolyte. However, where glycerine or other nonionic humectants are employed, they should be combined with an electrolyte. Also in the case of deliquescent salts, such as sodium and potassium formate which have a relatively low dissociation constant, it is preferable to 6 with 20 moles of ethylene oxide per mole of amine. The wetting agent was tridecyl alcohol which had been ethoxylated with 6 moles of ethylene oxide per mole of alcohol. The amounts of materials employed in each example are given in the appropriate column of Table I.

In all cases the antistatic coating was applied to the back of a tufted carpet having a primary loosely woven jute backing, and the type of fibers employed in the tufted pile are given in Table I as well as the amount of antistatic composition applied to the back of the carpet. After application of the antistatic coating the carpet was dried to remove excess moisture. A latex coating was then applied over the antistatic coating in such a manner that it did not encapsulate the antis-tatic coating.

The testing procedure used in these examples was the Walking Foot Scuff Test. This testing procedure is as follows: A carpet sample 9 feet longand 2 to 3 feet wide is spread on the floor. At one end of the carpet an electrostatic volt meter is positioned on a table. Beginning at the volt meter end of the carpet, the experimenter, wearing shoes having leather soles and heels, walks, shuffling his feet all the While to the opposite end, turns while still on the carpet, and returns to the volt meter end of the carpet where he immediately makes a hand contact with the probe. The electrical charge which is accumulated in the experimenter is transmitted to and registered on the volt meter. In all examples the testing was conducted at 77 F.i2 F. and at a constant relative humidity of to TABLE I Hulnectant Coating,

Parts Elecp adwt. in Charge Ex. Basic Organic Parts wetting tro- Parts ustment Carpet ozs. per build-up N0. compound Parts acid Parts amine agent lyte Parts water acid pH fiber sq. yard in kv 40 Acetic- 60 20 2 NaCl 2 210 Acetic. 6. 0-6. 5 Nylon. 2. 5 0-1. 0 40 .do 60 20 2 NaCl 6. 0-6. 5 WOOL--. 2. 0 0 56 Formic. 46 20 2 NaCl 2 6.0-6.5 Nylon. 2. 0 O 46 20 2 NaCl 2 6. 0-6. 5 W001. 2. 0 0 23 10 1 KCl 1 5. 5-6. 0 Nylon. 4. 5 1. 0-1. 5 23 10 1 KCl 1 5.5-6. 0 Wool- 2. 0 0. 5-1. 0 60 20 2 NaCl 2 6. 0-6. 5 Nylon-- 2. 5 0-1. 0 60 20 2 NaCl 2 200 .do 6.0-6. 5 W001. 2. 0 0 74 25 2 NaCl 3 500 Formic- 6. 0-6. 5 Nylon.. 5. 0 0. 5-1 5 74 25 2 NaCl 3 6.0-6.5 Wo0l--. 2. 0 0.5-1 0 56 25 3 NaCl 2. 5 6. 0-6. 5 Nylon. 2. 0 0 56 25 3 NaCl 2. 5 6.0-6. 5 1001.. 2 0 0 13 Nylon 8-15 14 1 4-9 1 Untreated control.

incorporate a small amount of a salt of a strong base and strong acid having a high dissociation constant, such as sodium chloride, potassium chloride or calcium chloride. Salts which are not sufficiently deliquescent such as sodium chloride, sodium sulfate,. potassium nitrate, so that'they do not function wholly satisfactorily as both humectant and electrolyte, can be employed in combination with a nonionic humectant, such as glycerine or urea or in combination with a more highly deliquescent salt, such as potassium formate or calcium chloride. Thus in the composition of the present invention, the humectant and electrolyte may be either a single compound or a mixture of compounds.

. If desired a further backing, such as a jute backing,

illustrated as 10 in the drawings, may be applied over the latex coating, but is not an essential element of the carpet structure of this invention.

The details of the present invention will be apparent from consideration of the following specific examples in which the parts are by weight.

EXAMPLES 1-14 In these examples the antistatic composition was prepared by adding the base and organic acid to water to form the humectant in situ. The alkoxylated amine employed was stearyl amine which had been ethoxylated EXAMPLES 1541 In these examples the samples treated Were nylon and Wool tufted carpet structures. In all cases the antistatic coating was applied to the base of the carpet fibers and primary jute and dried. A latex coating was then applied over the antistatic coating in such a fashion that it did not encapsulate the antistatic coating.

In these examples the humectant was formed in situ by the reaction of a basic component with an acidic component. The amine and wetting agent were the same as described in regard to Examples 1 to 12.

The testing procedure used in these examples was the Stationary Foot Scuff Test. This procedure is as follows:

The carpet to be tested is spread on the floor (18" x 18 minimum) and the person testing, wearing shoes having leather soles and heels stands on the carpetwith one foot stationary. While holding a volt meter in one hand, the experimenter rubs his other foot briskly on the carpet pile, a maximum of 15 strokes or until the meter reaches equilibrium, Any charge generated is transmitted through the person and registered on the volt meter. This testing was conducted at 77 F.:2 F., and at a constant relative humidity'of 35 to 40%.

The composition of the antistatic coating, as well as the test results and other pertinent information for these examples are given in Table II.

TABLE II Hnmectant Coating,

Parts ElecpH adwt. in Charge Ex. Basie Organic Parts wetting tro- Parts uStment Carpet ozs. per build-u No compound Parts aei Parts amine agent lyte Parts Water acid pH fiber sq. yard in kv.

60 20 2 NaCl 2 210 Acetic..-" 6. -6. Nylon.-. 2. 6 0. 5-1. 5 60 20 2 NaCl 2 210 -do 6.0-6.5 2. 0 0 46 20 2 N 9.01 2 180 Formica 6. 0-6. 5 2. 0 0 46 20 2 NaCl 2 6. 0-6. 5 2. 0 0 23 1 KCl 1 5. 5-6. 0 4. 5 1. 0-2. 0 23 10 1 KCl 1 5. 5-6. 0 2. 0 0. 5-1. 0 K 60 2 2 6. 0-6. 5 2. 5 0-1. 5 22. KOH 56 ..do 00 2 2 6.0-6.5 2 0 23..." KOH 56 Propionie- 74 2 3 6. 0-6. 5 5.0 1. 0-2 0 KOH 56 do 74 2 2 6. 0-6. 5 2. 0 1. 0-1 5 56 3 5 6. 0-6. 5 2 0 56 3 5 6. (H5. 5 2 0 60 2 2 6. 0-6. 5 4. 5 1. 0-2. 0 46 2 2 6. 0-6. 5 4. 5 1. 0-2. 0 74 2 2 6. 0-6. 5 6. 0 1. 5-2. 0 8-15 4-9 1 Untreated control.

EXAMPLES 32-46 In these examples the samples treated were nylon and wool tufted carpet structures. In all cases the antistatic coating was applied to the base of the carpet fibers and primary jute back and dried to remove the excess moisture. In these examples the wetting agent utilized was in accordance with the description given in regard to Examples 1 to 15. A latex coating was applied in such a fashion that it did not encapsulate the antistatic coating.

In these examples the humectant was not formed in situ, but instead was added directly to the antistatic composition, In examples 38-41 the calcium chloride functioned as both a humectant and electrolyte. The test procedure utilized in Examples 32., 33, 35, 36, 38, 39, 41-44 was Stationary Foot Scuff Test as is described above in regard to Examples to 31. The Walking Foot Scuff Test was used in Examples 34, 37 and 40 as per the description given in regard to examples 1 to 15. These tests were conducted at 77 F.- 2 F., and at a constant relative humidity of 35 to 40%.

The composition of the antistatic coating, as well as the test results and other pertinent information for these examples are given in Table III.

with the description given in accordance with Examples 1 to 15. In these examples a wetting agent was not utilized so as to prevent the antistatic coating from completely penetrating the textile.

In these examples the humectant was formed in situ by the reaction of a basic component with an acidic component as in Examples 1-15. The procedure for these examples was as follows:

The samples were cut and coated with the antistatic coating. In these examples the coating weight was based on the weight of the fabric in question. A polymeric backing was then applied to the fabric and dried at a temperature of from about 200 to 325 F. for a period of time of from about 10 to 30 minutes. The dried fabric was then conditioned for at least six hours at a temperature of i5 F. and 35 to 40% relative humidity. The coated material was then tested on an Atlab Tester, as developed by the Atlas Chemical Co., Wilmington, Del. The test procedure consists essentially of a means of controlled rubbing of a strip of fabric across a pair of static-generating (Teflon) bars and across a stainless steel bar which transfers the friction-generated charge to an electrostatic voltmeter for measurement. This testing was conducted at TABLE III Coatin Parts 911 adwt. in Charge Parts wetting Elec- Parts justment Carpet ozs. per build-up Humectant Parts amine agent trolyte Parts water acid pH fiber sq. yard inkv.

Sorbitol ester 10 20 1 NaCl 1 70 Acetic 5. 5-6. 5 Nylon 5 1 02.0 C 20 20 2 100 do.- 6. 5-6. ..d0.. 2 1.0-1. 5 20 20 100 do 5.5-6.5 do 2 .51.0 20 20 100 do 5.5-6.6 Wool. 2 0-1.0 30 20 110 -.-do. 5. 0-5.5 Nylon..... 2 '3 51.0 20 110 --.do.. 5. 0-5.5 ...d0 2 0 30 20 110 do 5. 0-5.5 W001 2 0-1.0 40 20 120 ...do 5. 0-5.5 Nylon.-- 2 0 40 20 120 -..do 5. 05.5 do 2 0 40 20 120 do 5. 0-5.6 Wool 2 0-1.0 10 10 10 Formie.. 6.0-6.5 Nylon.--" 3 1. 01.5 30 3 10 1 ..do.-... 5. 0-5.5 .d0 4 1.5-2. 0 30 4 10 100 Aeet 5.0-5. 5 3 1. 5-1. 5 8:3

1 Ethoxylated sorbitol laurie acid ester.

9 Humeetant was electrolyte.

B N-octyl, N-ethyl morpholinium ethosulfate. 4 Quaternary diethyl sulfate imldazolme.

5 Untreated control.

EXAMPLES 47-75 In these examples the samples treated were conventional Woven and nonwoven fabrics. In all cases the antistatic coating was applied to the textile and dried to remove the excess moisture. The amine utilized was in accordance 77 F.: :2 F., and at a constant relative humidity of 35 to 40%.

The composition of the antistatic coating, as well as the test results and other pertinent information for thes examples, are given in Table IV.

TABLE IV Humectant pH ad- Percent Charge Basic Organic Amine Electro- Parts justment Nylon coating build-up Ex.No. compound Parts acid arts parts lyte Parts water acid pH textile weight in kv. 47 NaOH 40 Acetic-.- 60 20 NaCl 2 210 Acetic-.." (3.0-6.5 2 1.0 48- NaOH 60 20 NaCl 2 6. -6.5 .5 49- NaOH 60 NaCl 2 6. 0-6.5 2 1.0 50- NaOH 60 20 NaCl 2 60-65 5 0 51- KOH 46 20 NaCl 2 6. 0-6.5 2 .5 52. KOH 46 20 NaOl 2 (5.0-6.5 5 0 53. X011 46 20 NaCl 2 6. 0-6.5 2 0.5 54- KOH 46 20 NaOl 2 6. 0-6.5 5 0 55- NaOH 23 10 K01 1 5.5-6.0 2 .5 56. NaOH 23 10 K01 1 5.5-6.0 5 0 57. NaOH 23 10 KCl 1 5.5-6.0 2 .5 58. NaOH 23 10 K01 1 5.5-6.0 5 .5 59- 60 20 NaCl 2 60-65 2 0 0 60 20 NaCl 2 6. 0-6.5 5 0 60 20 NaCl 2 6.0-6.5 2 .5 60 20 NaOl 2 6.0-6.5 5 0 74 25 NaCl 3 6.0-6.5 2 1.5 74 25 NaCl 3 6. 06.5 o 5 1 74 25 NaCl 3 6.06.5 Upholstery. 2 1.5 74 25 NaCl 3 (5.0-6.5 5 1 56 25 NaOl 25 (5.0-6.5 2 0 56 25 NaCl 25 (1.0-6.5 5 0 56 25 NaOl 25 60-65 2 .5 56 25 NaGl 25 (5.0-6.5 5 0 60 20 NaCl 2 60-65 2 0-1 121 Formic 46 20 NaOl 2 (5.0-6.5 2 0-1 121 Acetic. 74 20 NaCl 2 60-65 2 1 1 Untreated.

EXAMPLES 76-108 In these examples the samples treated were conventionally woven and nonwoven fabrics of the type and fibers shown in Table V. In all cases the antistatic coating was applied to the back of the textile sample and 35 dried to remove excess moisture. A polymeric backing was then applied to the fabric and cured at a temperature of from 200325 F. for from 10-30 minutes. The

coated material was then tested on an Atlab Tester in the manner described above in connection with Examples 74-75. In these examples the humectant was not formed in situ, but instead was added directly to the antistatic composition.

The composition of the antistatic coating as well as test results and other pertinent data for these examples are given in Table V.

TABLE VI Wetting EleepH ad- Percent Charge Amine agent 2 tro- Parts ustcoating build-up Ex. No. Humectant Parts parts parts lyte Parts water ment acid pH Textile 4 weight in kv. Sorbitol ester 10 20 1 N aCl 1 Acetic 5. 5-6. 5 Tafieta 2 1 d 1 20 1 NaCl 1 70 do 5. 5-6. 5 do 5 0 20 1 NaCl 1 5.5-6.5 d0 10 0 20 1 N aOl 1 5. 5-6. 5 Nylon rayon filled 2 1 uphostery. 20 1 NaCl 1 5. 5-6. 5 d 5 5 20 1 N a0] 1 5. 5-6. 5 10 0 l0 0 CaCl: 5 6. 0-6. 5 2 1 10 0 021012 5 6. 0-6. 5 5 0 10 0 CaClz 5 6. O-6. 6 10 0 10 0 C8012 5 6. 0-6. 5 2 1 10 0 CaClz 5 6. 0-6. 5 5 0 10 0 CaClz 5 6. 0-6. 5 10 0 20 0 0 5. 5-6. 5 3 0 20 0 0 5. 5-6. 5 5 0 20 0 0 5. s-e. s 10 o 20 0 0 5. 5-6. 5 3 0 20 O 0 5. 5-6. 5 5 0 20 0 0 5. 5-6. 5 0 0 20 O 0 5. 0-5. 5 3 0 2O 0 0 5. 0-5. 5 5 0 20 0 0 5. o-5. 5 10 0 20 0 0 5. 0-5. 5 3 0 20 0 0 5. 0-5. 5 5 0 2O 0 0 5. 0-5. 5 l0 0 20 0 5. 0-5. 5 3 0 20 0 0 5. 0-5. 5 5 0 20 0 0 5. 0-5. 5 l0 0 20 0 0 5.0-5. 5 3 0 20 0 0 5. 0-5. 5 5 0 20 0 0 5. 0-5. 5 10 0 1 l0 1 Nacl 1 Formic 5. 0-5. 5 2. 5 0-1 1 10 1 Nacl 1 110 do 5. 0-5. 5 Nylon rayon filled 5 0-1 upholstery. 10 1 Nael 1 110 do 5. 0-5. 5 Nylon rayon non- 5 5 woven.

1 N-octyl, N-ethyl morpholinium ethyl sulfate.

2 Condensate of tridecyl alcohol with 6 moles of ethylene oxide. 8 Ethoxylated sorbitol lauric acid ester.

4 Nylon-unless otherwise specified.

a Humectant was electrolyte.

We claim:

1. An antistatic textile product consisting essentially (1) a fibrous textile layer of thepile type having fibrous pile secured to a primary backing,-

(2) an antistatic coating composition layer on the primary backing and extending into the fibrous pile, said antistatic layer consisting essentially of a mixture of a (a) an organic textile antistatic agent,

(b) a humectant selected from thev group of ionic and nonionic humectants, and 1 when such humectant is a nonionic humectant,

an electrolyte, and

(3) a polymeric backing layer covering said antistatic layer, said antistatic layer being disposed between said fibrous textile layer and said polymeric backing layer.

2. An antistatic textile product consisting essentially (1) a fibrous textile layer of the pile type having the fibrous pile anchored in and extending from one side of a woven textile structure,

(2) an antistatic coating composition layer on the woven side of said pile type textile and extending into the fibrous pile, said antistatic layer consisting essentially of a mixture of (a) an organic textile antistatic agent,

(b) a humectant selected from the group of ionic and nonionic humectants, and

(c) when such humectant is a nonionic humectant,

an electrotyle, and

(3) a polymeric backing layer covering said antistatic layer, said antistatic layer being disposed between said fibrous textile layer and said polymeric backing layer.

3. An antistatic textile product as defined in claim 2,

wherein said fibrous textile layer is a tufted carpet structure having pile fibers tufted through a woven backing.

4. An antistatic textile product. as defined in claim 2, wherein said antistatic coating composition is applied at a concentration of from about 0.1 to 12 oz. per square yard.

5. An antistatic textile product as defined in claim 2, wherein said antistatic coating composition is applied at a concentraton of from about 0.5 to 3.0 oz. per square yard.

6. An antistatic textile product as defined in claim 1, wherein said organic antistatic textile agent is an alkoxylated tertiary amine.

7. An antistatic textile product as defined in claim 2, wherein said organic antistatic textile agent is an alkoxylated tertiary amine.

8. An antistatic textile product as defined in claim 3, wherein said organic antistatic textile agent is an alkoxylated tertiary amine.

9. An antistatic textile product as defined in claim 4, wherein said organic antistatic textile agent is an alkoxylated tertiary amine.

10. An antistatic textile product as defined in claim 5, wherein said organic antistatic textile agent is alkoxylated tertiary amine.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,302,003 11/1942 Caldwell et al. 161-67 XR 3,033,699 5/1962 Aarons et a1. 106286 3,132,065 5/1964 Barsy et a1. 317-2 XR 3,196,315 7/1965 Peterson 3172 3,371,247 2/1968 Mullenger 3172 ROBERT F. BURNETT, Primary Examiner R. H. CRISS, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

@2 3 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3 ,510, 386 Dated May 5 1970 Inventor(s) E. AL

It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 1, line 21, for "ionic", read nonionic i.n.e 22 for "nonionic", read ionic Signed and sealed this 27th day of June 1972.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER, JR. ROBERT GOTTSCHALK Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

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Classifications
U.S. Classification428/95, 428/97, 361/220
International ClassificationD06M23/00, D06N7/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06N7/0036, D06N7/0042, D06M23/00
European ClassificationD06N7/00B8B, D06N7/00B6, D06M23/00