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Publication numberUS3511414 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 12, 1970
Filing dateFeb 26, 1968
Priority dateFeb 26, 1968
Publication numberUS 3511414 A, US 3511414A, US-A-3511414, US3511414 A, US3511414A
InventorsKinnavy James W, Orser Robert E
Original AssigneeContinental Can Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Two compartment dispensing container for admixable products
US 3511414 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 1-2, 1970 J- w. KINNAVY ETAL 3,

TWO COMPARTMENT DISPENSING dONTAINER FOR ADMIXABLE PRODUCTS Filed Feb. 26. 1968 w 6 51. INVENTORS '1 30 JAMES LU.K\MNA\/Y 25 &-IZOBERTE.ORSER BY CWLM/M, @132, M

United States. Patent 3,511,414 TWO COMPARTMENT DISPENSING CONTAINER FOR ADMIXABLE PRODUCTS James W. Kinnavy, Westmont, and Robert E. Orser, Worth, Ill., assignors to Continental Can Company, Inc., New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Feb. 26, 1968, Ser. No. 708,416 Int. Cl. B67d 5/54 US. Cl. 222-136 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A primary object of this invention is to provide a novel dispensing container comprising first and second compartments adapted to receive different dispensable products, a conduit is housed substantially entirely within the first of the compartments which is constructed of flexible material, an inlet of the conduit opens into an outermost of the compartments and an outlet thereof is connected to a selectively operable valve, and a port places the innermost compartment in fluid communication with the conduit where, upon the opening of the valve, the products of both compartments are admixed in the conduit prior to being dispensed to atmosphere.

A further object of this invention is to provide a novel dispensing container of the type described wherein the conduit is provided with a trap to prevent premature admixing of the products.

With the above and oth r objects in view that will hereinafter appear, the nature of the invention will be more clearly understood by reference to the following detailed description, the appended claimed subject matter, and the several views illustrated in the accompanying drawing.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a sectional view taken through a dispensing container of this invention with portions thereof broken away for clarity, and illustrates the manner in whch two products are admixed in a conduit prior to being dispensed to atmosphere.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of a portion of the conduit and valve of FIG. 1, and more clearly illustrates the admixture of the products subsequent to the dispensing thereof to atmosphere.

A novel dispensing container constructed in accordance with this invention is generally designated by the reference numeral 10 (FIG. 1) and includes a container body 11 which is preferably constructed from metallic or similar relatively rigid material. A lower end portion of the container or can body 11 is closed by a bottom or closure 12 which is double-seamed at 13. A dome-shaped closure 14 is likewise double-seamed at 15 to an upper end of the can body 11. The dome-shaped closure 14 terminates in a radially outwardly and downwardly directed curl 16 which in conjunction with a curl 17 clampingly secures an upper end portion 18 of a flexible, collapsible bag 20 interiorly of the can body 11.

The interior of the bag 20 defines a compartment 21 for receiving a first dispensible product (not shown) while the volume between the bag 20 and the can body 11 defines another compartment 22 for receiving another product adapted to be admixed with the product of the com- 'ice partment 21 prior to being dispensed or discharged to atmosphere.

Means generally designated by the reference numeral 23 is provided to form a path of travel for the product in the compartment 22 to atmosphere, and it is preferably a plastic tube having an inlet end 24 projecting through an opening (unnumbered) in a bottom 29 of the bag 20. The inlet 24 terminates closely adjacent the bottom 12 and is preferably adhesively secured adjacent the opening (unnumbered) of the bottom 29 by a suitable adhesive.

An upper end portion of the conduit 23 is provided with a trap 25 which prevents the products of the compartments 21, 22 from admixing prematurely prior to being discharged to atmosphere. The trap 25 consists of a portion of the conduit 23 which is bent upon itself through approximately 360 degrees.

The conduit means 23 further includes as an extension thereof a tubular portion 26 of a valve mechanism 27 which is suitably united to a conventional valve cup 28. The tubular portion includes a passage 30 and a portion 31 which place the compartment 22 in fluid communication with the conduit means 23.

The valve 27 further includes a conventional depressable plunger 32 which is normally biased to an upward or closed position by a spring 33. In the lowermost position (FIG. 2) the passage 30 is placed in fluid communication with atmosphere through a passage 34 of the valve stem 32 and a discharge orifice 35.

Assuming that a liquid product entirely fills the compartment 21 and a liquid and a propellant are in the compartment 22 an admixed spray of the products can be effected simply by depressing the stem 32 of the valve 27 whereupon the pressure of the propellant in the compartment 22 forces the liquid therein through the conduit 23, the trap 25 and into the passage 30 whereupon the venturi effect draws the product of the compartment 21 into the passage 30 through the port 31. The products are admixed as they pass upwardly beyond the port 31 and during the passage thereof through the passage 34 and the discharge opening 35 whereupon they are emitted to atmosphere in an admixed spray S. The trap 25 is effective both during a dispensing operation and the filling of the dispensing container by in the first case preventing the product within the compartment 21 from flowing through the conduit 23 and into the compartment 22 whereat it would prematurely admix with the liquid therein. Likewise, during a filling operation, the compartment 21 is first filled prior to being clamped into position by the valve cup 27 whereupon the trap 25 prevents the liquid in the fully filled compartment 21 from flowing outwardly therefrom through the port 31 and the conduit 23. The dispensing container is then inverted and the compartment 22 is filled with a suitable liquid and again the trap 25 serves to prevent the liquid of the second compartment from flowing through the conduit 23 prior to the eventual charging of the compartment 22 with propellant and the closure thereof by the bottom 12.

It is also pointed out that due to the collapsible nature of the bag 20 the propellant in the chamber 22 continually reduces the volume of the compartment 21 as dispensing operations continue whereupon the level of the liquid within the compartment 21 is maintained at all times above the port 31.

An experimental dispensing container was constructed in accordance with this disclosure and was successfully experimentally tested. The bag 20 of the experimental dispensing container was filled with between -140 ml. of a 1% NaOH solution while 40-50 ml. of water was added to the compartment 22 prior to the double seaming of the closure 12 thereto. The container was charged with a regenerating propellant, such as Freon, although nonregenerating propellants may be used. With a charging pressure of 40 p.s.i.g. the dispensing rate of the admixed liquids from both compartments was approximately 1 ml. per second. The ratio of the components of the admixture was checked and varied between 1:9 to 1:1 /2, although it has been found that these ratios can be altered by changing the inlet 24 of the conduit 23 and the size of the port 31.

We claim:

1. A dispensing container comprising first and second means defining respective first and second product receiving compartments, conduit means placing said first and second compartments in fluid communication, said conduit means being housed in said first compartment but having an inlet opening into said second compartment, valve means for selectively placing said conduit means in fluid communication with atmosphere, port means placing said first compartment in fluid communication with said conduit means whereby upon the opening of said valve means a pressurized product in said second compartment is forced through said conduit means and is admixed with a product from the first compartment prior to being dispensed to atmosphere through said valve means, and said conduit means includes means between said port means and said inlet opening for preventing premature admixture of the products.

2. The dispensing container as defined in claim 1 wherein said preventing means is a trap formed by a portion of said conduit means bent upon itself through at least approximately 180 degrees.

3. The dispensing container as defined in claim 1 wherein said preventing means is a trap formed by a portion of said conduit means within said first compartment bent upon itself through at least approximately 180 degrees.

4. The dispensing container as defined in claim 1 wherein said first compartment is constructed from collapsible material.

5. The dispensing container as defined in claim 1 wherein said compartments are in generally telescopic relationship, said compartments each have bottoms, and said inlet terminates contiguous the bottom of the second compartment.

6. The dispensing container as defined in claim 3 wherein said first compartment is constructed from collapsible material.

7. The dispensing container as defined in claim 3 wherein the portion of said conduit means bent upon itself is bent through at least approximately 360' degrees.

8. The dispensing container as defined in claim 3 Wherein the portion of said conduit means bent upon itself is bent through at least approximately 360 degrees, said first compartment is constructed from collapsible material and includes a bottom fixedly secured to said conduit means adjacent said inlet opening.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,172,581 3/1965' Nanni 222464 3,217,936 11/1965 Abplanalp 222136 3,241,722 3/1966 Nissen 222136 3,260,421 7/ 1966 Rabussier 222464 X 3,325,056 6/1967 Lewis 222136 X STANLEY H. TOLLBERG, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 222193

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3172581 *Apr 19, 1963Mar 9, 1965Nanni MartinFluid withdrawal means for tanks
US3217936 *Jan 9, 1963Nov 16, 1965Robert Henry AbplanalpDispenser for materials under pressure
US3241722 *Dec 24, 1963Mar 22, 1966Warren I NissenDispensing device
US3260421 *Sep 3, 1965Jul 12, 1966Precision Valve CorpDispensing device for aerosol pressure containers
US3325056 *Feb 23, 1966Jun 13, 1967Du PontApparatus for codispensing a plurality of liquids
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3869070 *Apr 10, 1973Mar 4, 1975Mdt Chemical CorpAerosol dispensing container for separately stored fluids
US4801465 *Apr 20, 1987Jan 31, 1989Sponer Richard ADispenser apparatus for a solid particulate material and a fluid
US7455195 *Jun 26, 2003Nov 25, 2008Daizo Co., Ltd.Container for discharging plural contents, a dispenser using the container, and a process for producing the dispenser
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/136, 222/635
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/682
European ClassificationB65D83/68B