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Publication numberUS3511533 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 12, 1970
Filing dateNov 17, 1967
Priority dateNov 25, 1966
Also published asDE1529497A1, DE1960807U
Publication numberUS 3511533 A, US 3511533A, US-A-3511533, US3511533 A, US3511533A
InventorsFritz E Drabert
Original AssigneeFritz E Drabert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chairs
US 3511533 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

CHAIRS Filed Nov. 1v. 19s? 2 sheets-sheet 1 INVENTOR HEUTE, Dansen.

3,511,533 CHAIRS Fritz E. Drabert, Marienstrasse 37, Minden, Westphalia, Germany Filed Nov. 17, 1967, Ser. No. 684,014 Claims priority, application Germany, Nov. 25, 1966,

im. c1. A47c 15/00 U.S. Cl. 297--337 11 Claims ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE A chair with a seat which is adjustable forwardly and rearwardly with respect to a backrest. The seat carries pins which selectively engage holes in a transverse support.

This invention relates to chairs.

Working chairs in general have the seat rigidly secured to the lower framework. This non-adjustable seat often has disadvantages for the user, whether seated at a desk or at a machine. According to the users size, including thigh length, which differs from one person to another, there is a desire to adjust the distance between the front edge of the seat and the chair back and to adapt it to the sitting position of the moment, so that the seated person may still feel the benefit of the backrest, whatever his posture. Thus, for example, a shorter seat length is desirable in front of a typewriter and of oice machines in general, because of the forward posture, than for reading at a desk, for which purpose the sitters torso is positioned further back. An object of the invention is to provide a general purpose chair incorporating the best seating characteristics and suitable for all places of work. This means, in other words, that the distance between the front edge of the seat and the chair backrest can lbe readily adjusted by the user.

In conjunction with this, the backrest may be resilient, that is to say, it can be tilted, but it ihas no horizontal adjustment in the plane of the seat. There are, too, some working positions in which the torso is supported by the pelvis in what may be called a standing seat position. For this, an inclined and perhaps tiltable seat can be fitted to an extra high chair ibase, so that the seat can be moved as far as desired, until it presents but a short supporting surface, as is usual with the standing seat.

Seat adjustment according to the invention is very simple to carry out. For this, the seated person raises his thighs a little, so as to take his weight off the seat, and he can then move the seat forward or back with one hand, as he wishes, no locking mechanism being required.

According to one feature in accordance with the invention, the positioning rails are fixed to the seat bearer.

Another feature in accordance with the invention is that at least two retainers are fixed to the underside of the seat, to prevent this from coming completely adrift from the sea bearer. These retainers are formed from Z-sectioned angle iron.

In accordance with a further feature, the clearance between the one horizontal arm of each retainer and the corresponding positioning rails is such that, when the seat is raised, the peg just clears the corresponding holes in the positioning rail.

Each positioning rail has a stop against which the retainer comes to Ibear when the seat is in one of its extreme positions. This stop is formed by bending over one end of each positioning rail.

Various practical examples of chairs, embodying the United States Patent O Patented May l2, 1970 rice invention are described hereinafter in conjunction with the accompanying purely diagrammatic drawings, in which:

FIGS. 1 and 2 are side elevations of a chair as herein proposed, with the seat in the front and rear positions respectively;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation of a chair as herein proposed, with an extra high -base and a tilting seat having a short supporting face;

FIGS. 4 and 5 are side elevations of a slightly modified version of the chair shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 6 is a partial section along the line I-I in FIG. l;

FIG. 7 is a partial section along the line II-II in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 8 is a discontinuous longitudinal section of the seat of a chair in accordance with the invention.

The drawings show a chair underframe or support 1, to which is fixed a seat bearer 2. A movable seat 3, rests on the bearer 2, which is made up of rectangular-sectioned tubing. Below the seat 3, rails 4 of a two-part means or Apositioning device are fixed to the rectangular tubing, following the direction of the seat. These positioning rails 4 contain a number of holes 5. A peg 6, firmly fixed to the underside of the seat 3, fits into one or other of the holes 5 in each positioning rail 4 lwhen the seat 3 rests on the bearer 2, in contact with the positioning rail the two-part means are rigid with the underside of the seat and with the seat bearer respectively and are capable of selective interengagement at a plurality of positions from a rearward extrerne position to a forward extreme position whereby the effective seating depth from front to back is adjustable. In the rearward extreme position a portion of the seat extends through and beyond an opening defined between the lower edge of the back rest and the seat bearer, whereas in the forward extreme position the rear edge of the seat lies in in the opening. j

To -prevent the seat 3 from becoming completely disengaged, it has substantially Z-shaped retainers 7, fixed to it. The clearance between the one horizontal arm of each retainer 7 and its corresponding positioning rail 4 is such that, when the seat 3 is raised, the peg 6 just clears the corresponding holes 5 in the positioning rail 4, so that the pegs 6 can travel along above the rails 4 and be introduced in the next -pair of holes.

The rail 8 fixed at the rear end of the bearer 2 below the seat 3 contains no holes at all, ibeing intended only to provide the seat 3 with uniform support.

The purpose of a bent-over stop 9 is to limit the range of adjustment of the seat. A backrest 11 has a lower edge 12 spaced upwardly from the seat bearer 2 to define an opening 13.

FIGS. 4 and 5 show a chair, the seat 3 of which is provided with a wedge-shaped support for the pelvis. In the normal position (FIG. 4), this support is fully effective, whereas, with the seat 3 in the position shown in FIG. 5, the wedge support 10 has passed below the backrest in the course of adjustment of the seat 3 and is therefore more or less ineffective. In each embodiment the chair has a back rest 11 which is fixed to prevent horizontal adjustment relative to the supporter underframe 1.

Iclaim:

1. In a chair comprising a support,

a seat bearer means,

a seat mounted on the seat bearer means,

a backrest fixed to prevent horizontal adjustment relative to the support, and a lower edge thereof being spaced upwardly from the seat bearer means to define an opening, and

two part means rigid with the underside of the seat and with the seat bearer means respectively capable of selective interengagement at a plurality of positions from a rearward extreme position in which a portion of the seat extends through and beyond the said opening to a forward extreme position in which the rear edge lies in said opening whereby the effective seating depth from front to back of the chair is adjustable progressively `by movement of the seat relative to the seat bearer means.

2. A chair according to claim 1, -wherein the seat is self'locking relatively to the seat bearer means in its adjusted position.

3. A chair according to claim 1 comprising a wedgeshaped support for the user at the rear of the seat.

4. A chair according to claim 1 wherein said two-part means includes at least one positioning rail having a plurality of holes therein,

and a -peg secured to the seat so as selectively to iit into and be retained in one of the holes of the corresponding positioning rail when in the position for locking. v

5. A chair according to claim 4 comprising a plurality of said rails, each rail being secured to the seat bearer means.

6. A chair according to claim 4 comprising at least two retainers secured to the underside of the seat to prevent the latter from becoming completely disengaged from the seat bearer means.

7. A chair according to claim 6, in which each retainer is in the form of a substantially Z-section member.

8. A chair according to claim 7, in which the clearance between the one horizontal arm of each retainer and its corresponding positioning rail is such that, when the seat is raised, a corresponding said .peg just clears the corresponding holes in the positioning rail.

9. A chair according to claim 6, in which each positioning rail has a stop, against which the retainer abuts -When the seat is in one extreme position.

10. A chair according to claim 9, in which each stop is formed by a bent-over end of each positioning rail.

11. A chair comprising,

a support,

Cil

a seat bearer means,

a back rest xed against horizontal movement relatively to the support and a lower edge thereof being spaced upwardly from the seat bearer means to define an opening, and

a seat mounted on the seat bearer means, and

said seat bearer means including a pair of parallel positioning rails each having a plurality of holes apertures spaced along the length thereof,

a corresponding pair of pegs secured to the underside of the seat so as selectively to tit into and .be retained in one of the holes of the corresponding positioning rail when in the position for locking, and

at least two Z-section retainers secured to the underside of the seat to prevent the seat from becoming dis-engaged from the rails, said seat bearer means serving to support the seat and to permit adjustment in a horizontal sense at and between two extreme positions in one of which positions a portion of the seat extends through and beyond the said opening and in the other of which positions the rear edge of the seat lies in the opening.

References Cited UNTTED STATES PATENTS BOBBY R. GAY, Primary Examiner G. O. FINCH, Assistant Examiner

Patent Citations
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US1247521 *Mar 27, 1917Nov 20, 1917Frank F FischerAuditorium-chair.
US1838199 *Nov 10, 1928Dec 29, 1931Thomas Arvine NAdjustable seat
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US2078961 *Jul 10, 1933May 4, 1937Leo A MeltzerTheater chair
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US2678681 *Aug 4, 1952May 18, 1954Jules HaltenbergerAutomotive seat adjustment
US3235308 *Jul 27, 1964Feb 15, 1966Flexible Air Seat CorpAdjustable seat apparatus
US3362746 *Jun 13, 1966Jan 9, 1968John R. HuygeAdjustable driver's seat for commercial vehicles
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4054318 *Aug 20, 1976Oct 18, 1977Lear Siegler, Inc.Seat cushion mounting arrangement
US4240663 *Mar 14, 1979Dec 23, 1980Giroflex Entwicklungs AgAdjustable stacking chair
US4738487 *Apr 18, 1986Apr 19, 1988Ergoform Inc.Tilting seat
US4798414 *Feb 22, 1988Jan 17, 1989Vincent HughesPhysiotherapeutic chair like device
US4875734 *Dec 30, 1987Oct 24, 1989Tachi-S Co., Ltd.Automotive seat
US4893826 *May 6, 1987Jan 16, 1990Canhart Industries, Inc.Mobility support device
US5035466 *Apr 3, 1989Jul 30, 1991Krueger International, Inc.Ergonomic chair
US5301968 *Oct 15, 1991Apr 12, 1994Guardian Products, Inc.Mobility support device
US5755488 *Mar 6, 1997May 26, 1998Steelcase Inc.Chair with adjustable seat
US7159942Aug 24, 2005Jan 9, 2007L & P Property Management CompanySeat slide adjustment mechanism
US7252336 *Nov 5, 2002Aug 7, 2007Matthew Stephen FrisinaPivotable boat seat
US7293825 *Sep 12, 2005Nov 13, 2007Advantage Branch & Office Systems, LlcMulti-position chair
US7341233Sep 19, 2003Mar 11, 2008L & P Property Management CompanyHorizontal adjustment mechanism for use on a chair seat
US7357315Sep 12, 2005Apr 15, 2008Advantage Branch & Office Systems, LlcCustomer interaction console and configurable console system
US7478880Nov 3, 2005Jan 20, 2009L&P Property Management CompanyMulti-purpose adjustment chair mechanism
US8220872 *Dec 14, 2011Jul 17, 2012Simon Yeonjun HongSit-stand chair
US20110304192 *Jun 15, 2010Dec 15, 2011Augustat Betty AErgometric Chair Apparatus
US20120086252 *Dec 14, 2011Apr 12, 2012Simon HongSit-Stand Chair
US20120319444 *Jun 14, 2012Dec 20, 2012Paul OnopaSitting and Standing Chair
WO1988010082A1 *Jun 23, 1988Dec 29, 1988Kurt Aron ErikssonAppliance for disabled persons
WO1990011707A1 *Apr 2, 1990Oct 18, 1990Krueger Int IncErgonomic chair
WO2001070072A1 *Mar 17, 2001Sep 27, 2001Brueske JoachimSeat
WO2004078089A1 *Mar 7, 2003Sep 16, 2004Glasgow School Of ArtPatient support apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/337
International ClassificationA47C1/023, A47C1/022, A47C9/00, A47C9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47C1/023, A47C9/02
European ClassificationA47C9/02, A47C1/023