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Publication numberUS3512262 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 19, 1970
Filing dateMay 31, 1968
Priority dateMay 31, 1968
Publication numberUS 3512262 A, US 3512262A, US-A-3512262, US3512262 A, US3512262A
InventorsSmyk Walter M, Turner Frank E
Original AssigneeTurner Frank E, Smyk Walter M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf ball sphericity gauge and putting device
US 3512262 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

GOLF BALL SPHER ICITY GAUGE AND PUTTING DEVICE Filed May 31, 1 968 INVENTORS WALTER M. SMYK BY FRANK E. TURNER m MJW I ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,512,262 GOLF BALL SPHERICITY GAUGE AND PUTTING DEVICE Walter M. Smyk, 437 Valencia Drive, South San Francisco, Calif. 94080, and Frank E. Turner, 3 Greenfield Court, San Mateo, Calif. 94403 Filed May 31, 1968, Ser. No. 733,602 Int. Cl. G01b 3/34; A63b 53/04 U.S. Cl. 33-178 4 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A golf ball sphericity gauge having an aperture into which snugly fits the largest cross-sectional area of a standard-size golf ball. A support is fixed relative to the body of the device for positively supporting the golf ball in such position. The outer dimensions of the device are such that, if it is placed on a horizontal surface and contacted by a golf ball rolling on that surface, the golf ball will fall within the area defined by a standard-size golf hole.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to golfing apparatus, and more particularly, to a combination gauge for testing the sphericity of golf balls and device for use in golf putting practice.

As is well known, it is extremely important that the equipment used in the game of golf be in good condition and up to specifications. This is particularly true of the golf balls used. It has been found that an out-of-round golf ball can cause problems in golf that even great skill on the part of the golfer cannot compensate for.

While modern manufacturing techniques are used to produce golf balls with substantially perfect spherical shapes, with the use of a ball, it generally becomes deformed. This is so because of the relatively great force applied thereto by a swinging club face. When the ball becomes less spherical, its travel cannot be predicted as accurately, whether the ball is being driven or putted. This, of course, results in great problems to the golfer, which are usually reflected in his score. It would therefore be desirable to provide a gauge which can be used to test the roundness of a golf ball.

The usual type of gauge devised for such use is of the Go-No Go type as disclosed in the U.S. Pat. No. 3,310,879 to Brzezinski et al. Such a gauge has a passageway which is of accurately machined constant diameter that provides a slip fit between the interior surface of the passageway and the largest cross-section of a standard, undeformed golf ball. If the golf ball passes through the passageway, it is then rotated to a new position and another attempt is made to pass it through the passageway. This continues on until one is satisfied that the ball is satisfactorily round. Such a repeated procedure is obviously relatively time-consuming since the ball, for the test to be complete, must be passed through the passageway numerous times, in various positions.

A device of more general interest is the one disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 2,785,474 to Mages et al. Therein is shown a ball the roundness of which is tested by a precision micrometer, the overall device being quite complicated.

It is an object of this invention to provide a device 3,512,262 Patented May 19, 1970 which is capable of quickly and efiectively testing the roundness of a golf ball, meanwhile being extremely simple and convenient to use.

It is well known, of course, to provide devices which may be placed on a rug in a house to take the place of the golf hole, so that one may practice his putting in the convenience of his home. Such devices are themselves relatively complicated.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a device which, while fulfilling theabove objects, can be used for practice putting in the home, and is quite simple.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION 'Broadly stated, applicants golf ball sphericity gauge comprises a body member having a circular top portion defining a circular aperture therein of a size to snugly receive the maximum cross-sectional area of a standard, undeformed golf ball, and means fixed to and extending from the body member for supporting the golf ball in a position with its largest cross-sectional area snugly fitted in the aperture. The body member further has a circular bottom portion adapted to rest on a horizontal surface, and an upright conical surface portion interconnecting the top and bottom portions and adapted to be contacted at a pluraltiy of points thereabout by a golf ball rolling on the horizontal surface on which the bottom of the body portion rests. The points about the upright conical surface portion which may be contacted by the golf ball rolling on the horizontal surface define a circle the diameter of which is substantially 4.25-1.68 sine (angle between the conical surface portion and horizontal) inches.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS These and other objects of the invention will become apparent from a study of the following description and drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of the preferred embodiment of the device;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation, partially in section, of the device of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of another embodiment of the device;

FIG. 4 is a side elevation, partially in section, of the device of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of yet another embodiment of the device;

FIG. 6 is a side elevation, partially in section, of the device of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a schematic fragmentary side elevation of the embodiment of FIGS. 3 and 4, showing'the geometrical relationship of certain dimensions of the structure.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In FIGS. 1 and 2, a first embodiment of the device is shown generally at 10. The device 10 has a plastic body member 12 which includes a circular top portion 14 which defines a circular aperture 16. The aperture 16 is of such size to snugly receive the maximum cross section of a standard, undeformed golf ball 18 placed thereon.

Plastic means 20 are included for supporting the golf ball 18 in such position (i.e., with its largest cross-sectional area snugly fitted in the aperture 16). Means 20, in the embodiment, are made up of a plurality of arms 22 fixed to the body member 12 and extending inwardly therefrom,

and a pillar 24 fixed to the inner ends of the arms 22. The pillar 24 supports the golf ball 18 with the greatest cross sectionl area thereof in the aperture 16-.

If it is desired to test the roundness of a golf ball 18, it is placed in the aperture 16 and rests on the pillar 24. Of course, with the golf ball 18 in one position, it cannot be told whether the golf ball 18 is satisfactorily spherical, because only one cross section thereof is being tested. However, the golf ball 18 may be repositioned in a continuous manner by running the fingers over it to rotate it while it rests on the pillar 24. The arrows of FIG. 2 show this being done in one direction. It will be understood, of course, that that direction can be changed at will, and that the ball 18 will have substantially all of its maximum cross sections disposed in the aperture 16 within a matter of seconds. Each of these cross sections must fit snugly within the aperture 16 for the ball to rotate relatively freely. If the ball is out-of-round or deformed, jamming between the ball 18 and the aperture 16 will occur, requiring a relatively great force to rotate the ball 18. Such jamming, of course, is an indication that the ball 18 is deformed.

The embodiment shown in FIGS. 3 and 4 is similar to that of FIGS. 1 and 2, being a plastic body member 26 which includes a circular top portion 28 which defines a circular aperture 30. Plastic means 32 are included for supporting the golf ball 18. Means 32 are made up of a plate 34 fixed to the body member 26, and a pillar 36 fixed to the plate 34. The pillar 36 supports the golf ball 18 with the greatest cross-sectional area thereof in the aperture 30*. The operation of the embodiment is the same as that of the previous embodiment.

The embodiment shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 is similar to the two previously described embodiments, but is made entirely of metal, with the means for supporting the golf ball 18 being an annular member 38 fixed to a body member 40 and defining a bore 42 the periphery of which supports the golf ball 18.

A study of FIGS. 3 and 4 reveals that the body member 26 has a circular bottom portion 44 which is adapted to rest on a horizontal surface 46, and an upright conical surface portion 48 interconnecting the top and bottom portions 28 and 44. With the bottom portion 44 resting on the horizontal surface 46, the conical surface portion 48 is adapted to be contacted at a plurality of points thereabout by a golf ball 18 rolling on the horizontal surface 46. These points which may be contacted define a circle 50, as shown in FIG. 3. The diameter D of the circle 50 and the angle at (FIG. 4) between the conical surface portion 48 and the horizontal surface portion 46 have an important relation ship, which will now be described in detail. Reference is also made to FIG. 7, which more clearly shows this relationship.

A standard-size golf ball has a diameter of 1.68 inches. If golf balls 18 are positioned at A and B, on opposite sides thev contact the conical surface portion 48. They also contact the horizontal surface 46 at points X and Y respectively. Z represents the distance between points X and Y. If the diameter of circle 50 is represented by D, it will be seen that the distance from point X to point Y, that is, the distance Z =D+F G Since the balls 18A and 18B are substantially identical, F=G, and the distance Z=D+2F Since the triangles J and K are similar, angle tz=angle a (FIG. 7). Thus the distance F= /2 (diameter of ball 18) sine a:

/2 (diameter of ball 18) sine c: /2 (1.68) sine a Z=D+2( /2)1. 68 sine or:

D+1.68 sine a.

If Z is chosen as 4.25 inches,

4 4.25:D+1.68 sine a, or

D=4.25-l.68 sine 0c inches.

It will be seen that if a golf ball 18 is putted toward a device resting on the horizontal surface 46, and the diameter D of the circle 50 defined by the possible points of contact between the ball 18 and conical surface portion 48 is D:4.25l.68 sine 00 inches the ball 18, if it contacts the device at all, would have to pass over the edge of an imaginary circle 4.25 inches in diameter. The diameter of a normal hole in a golf course is 4.25 inches, and so, if the dimensions are chosen as described, the device can be used for putting practice.

The other embodiment shown and described incorporates th same relationship of dimensions, with D and at being varied in accordance with D=4.251.68 sine 00 inches and can be used in the same way.

Each of the embodiments of the devices disclosed herein can thus be used for two purposes. Each can easily and conveniently be used to test accurately whether a golf ball is deformed to any degree. This is so because each embodiment includes a positive support for the ball being tested to hold it in the gauging aperture and on which the ball can be rolled. It is insured by such support that the ball is held in proper position, with its largest cross-sectional area in the gauging aperture. Each embodiment can also easily and conveniently be used as a putting device, merely by placing it on the rug of ones home. This is so because of applicants dimensional relationship described above, which insures that, if a rolling ball strikes the device, the ball would roll over the edge of a standard-size hole, or inward thereof. It will be noted that, besides being capable of such uses, each embodiment is extremely simple and convenient for such uses.

Obviously, the invention can be carried out in many different ways, of which the embodiments shown and described are merely illustrative.

We claim:

1. A golf ball sphericity gauge comprising:

(a) a body member having a circular aperture therein of a size to snugly receive the maximum crosssectional area of a standard, undeformed golf ball, and

(b) means fixed to an extending from the body member for supporting the golf ball in positions with its largest cross-sectional area snugly fitted in the aperture, wherein the body member includes a circular top portion defining the circular aperture, a circular bottom portion adapted to rest on a horizontal surface, and an upright conical surface portion interconnecting the top and the bottom portions and adapted to be contacted at a plurality of points thereabout by a golf ball rolling on the horizontal surface on which the bottom of the body portion rests wherein the points about the upright conical surface portion which may be contacted by the golf ball rolling on the horizontal surface define a circle the diameter of which is defined by the expression D:4.25-l.68 sine a inches (on is the acute angle between the conical surface portion on the horizontal and D is the diameter).

2. A golf ball sphericity gauge according to claim 1 wherein the means fixed to and extending from the body member for supporting the golf ball comprises a plate fixed to the body member and a pillar extending from the plate and by which the golf ball is supported in said position w1th its largest cross-sectional area fitted snugly 1n the aperture.

3. golf ball sphericity gauge according to claim 1 wherein the means fixed to and extending from the body member for supporting the golf ball comprises a plurality of arms fixed to the body member and extending inwardly therefrom, and a pillar fixed to the arms and by which the golf ball is supported in said position with its largest cross-sectional area fitted snugly in the aperture.

4. A golf ball sphericity gauge according to claim 1 wherein the means fixed to and extending from the body member for supporting the golf ball comprises an annular member fixed to the body member and defining a bore the periphery of which supports the golf ball in said position with its largest cross-sectional area fitted snugly in the aperture,

References Cited LEONARD FORMAN, Primary Examiner D. A. DEARING, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2635879 *May 25, 1951Apr 21, 1953Rath William HSimulated golf cup
US2863223 *Mar 13, 1956Dec 9, 1958Reicherter GeorgGauge for testing the roundness and the diameter of cylindrical work pieces
US3310879 *Jul 10, 1964Mar 28, 1967Milliken Res CorpGolf ball sphericity gauge and utility tool
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3665757 *Apr 23, 1971May 30, 1972Int Recreation Products IncCombined golf ball concentricity and compression tester
US3797123 *Jan 22, 1973Mar 19, 1974Fraley TPortable precision golf ball sphericity gauge
US3828442 *May 14, 1973Aug 13, 1974H BernardGolf ball sphericity gauge
US3891221 *Jul 22, 1974Jun 24, 1975Harold L GordonMagnetic golf game
US4385447 *May 29, 1981May 31, 1983Bennett Charles JGolf ball sphericity gauge
US4925191 *Sep 6, 1989May 15, 1990Ogilvie Garry JPutting target
US5261670 *Mar 31, 1992Nov 16, 1993Mull Richard FPutting stroke developer
US6082015 *Apr 23, 1996Jul 4, 2000Bjorkdahl; RolfBall gauge
US6213012Jul 16, 1999Apr 10, 2001Christopher T. ArmsGolf ball marking device
US6279245 *Apr 16, 1997Aug 28, 2001Erling JohnsenBall controller for checking the diameter of a golf ball
US6453807Mar 27, 2001Sep 24, 2002Shon C. RameyGolf ball marking tool
US6679782Sep 26, 2002Jan 20, 2004Callaway Golf CompanyPutter head
US7052407 *Oct 16, 2001May 30, 2006Patterson Owen MGolf putting practice device
US7837573 *Jun 19, 2009Nov 23, 2010Bullock David CGolf putting training device
US20130053158 *Aug 24, 2012Feb 28, 2013Scott J. DowningPortable golf putting target
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/555.2, 473/187, 473/180, 473/394
International ClassificationA63B57/00, A63B71/04, A63B69/36, G01B5/00, G01B3/34, A63B63/00, A63B47/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/3676, A63B57/0056, G01B5/0023, A63B47/008, A63B71/04, G01B3/34, A63B63/00
European ClassificationA63B69/36P, G01B3/34, A63B47/00M, A63B71/04, A63B63/00, G01B5/00G, A63B57/00D