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Publication numberUS3512741 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 19, 1970
Filing dateNov 14, 1966
Priority dateNov 14, 1966
Publication numberUS 3512741 A, US 3512741A, US-A-3512741, US3512741 A, US3512741A
InventorsGoldstein Irving
Original AssigneeGoldstein Irving
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Display figure supporting construction
US 3512741 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 19, 1970 1. GOLDSTEIN 3,512,741

- DISPLAY FIGURE SUPPORTING CONSTRUCTION Filed Nov. 14. 1966 5 Shets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. 15 0i? G'olzisfez'n W R y May19,1970 l. GOLIDSTEZIN I 3, I

DISPLAY FIGURE SUPPORTING CONSTRUCTION 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov.- 14, 1966 15 0572 GoZJdez'rz May 19,, 1970 l. 'GOLDSTEIN DISPLAY FIGURE SUPPORTING CONSTRUCTION 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Nov. 14, 1966 WWW United States Patent Ofiice 3,512,741 Patented May 19, 1970 3,512,741 DISPLAY FIGURE SUPPORTING CONSTRUCTION Irving Goldstein, 260 Westfieltl Road, Eggertsville, N.Y. Filed Nov. 14, 1966, Ser. No. 593,879 Int. Cl. A41h 5/00; A63h 3/50 U.S. Cl. 248206 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A display figure supporting construction including a magnet, an elongated rod-like member for mounting the magnet relative to a fixed standard, a keeper, a belt for mounting the keeper on the display figure including a flexible connection between the keeper and the belt, and a coating on the magnet for preventing abrasion of a garment location between the magnet and the keeper upon separation of the magnet from the keeper. A display figure supporting construction wherein two spaced keepers are mounted on the belt and two spaced magnets are mounted on a yoke for engagement with the spaced keepers.

The present invention relates to an improved supporting construction of the type which is used to stabilize a display figure, such as a manikin, which is used for the purpose of exhibiting apparel.

In the past various types of display figure supporting constructions have been utilized. A very common type utilized a base with a rod extending upwardly therefrom which impaled the buttocks of the manikin. Another type utilized a rod extending from a base into the calf of the leg. Other types utilized pins or the like which extended into the underside of the foot of the manikin and required a relatively complex connection, but did not provide particularly firm support.

The foregoing prior types of manikin supports are deficient in a number of respects. First of all, with the type having a rod extending into the buttocks, pants, narrow slacks, leotards, form-fitting undergarments and the like cannot be mounted on the manikin without actually destroying the garment, that is making a hole in the seat of the garment to permit the rod to extend into the buttocks. The same is generally true of the type having the rod extending into the calf of the leg except that a hole must be made in the calf of the garment or the garment must be objectionally distorted. With the type having a pin extending into the underside of the foot, socks and shoes which are mounted on the manikin have to be destroyed. In the event that socks and shoes are not used, then the manikin looks unnatural, that is, only partially dressed, and therefore hardly displays the apparel to greatest commercial advantage. Prior type manikin supports were also deficient in that the attitude of the manikin was fixed, and therefore it could not assume action poses, such as diving, bending, or the like. It is with an improved display figure supporting construction which overcomes all of the foregoing shortcomings of the prior art that the present invention is concerned.

It is accordingly one important object of the present invention to provide an improved display figure supporting construction which does not in any way interfere with the proper dressing of the figure and does not require the destruction of the garment or produce any distortion thereof. A related object is to provide an improved display figure supporting construction which permits the figure to be fully dressed, thereby displaying the apparel to greatest commercial advantage. A further related object of the present invention is to provide a display figure supporting construction which does not use an unsightly and heavy base.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved display figure supporting construction which can be used on any existing manikin and thereby convert a manikin which only had limited utility for certain types of apparel into one which can be universally used for all types of apparel.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an improved display figure supporting construction which can firmly and reliably support the manikin in any desired type of action pose to thereby display action-type of clothes to greatest commercial advantage.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an improved display figure supporting construction which provides the Window designer with great latitude of design in that the manikin can be moved about easily to assume any desired position in a display panorama, and further can be attached and detached from its supporting structure with a minimum of effort and inconvenience, as desired, without the necessity of handling heavy and cumbersome base structures.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide an improved display figure supporting construction which can be attached to practically any part of the manikin anatomy, thereby enhancing the ease with which a display decorator can work. Other objects and attendant advantages of the present invention will readily be perceived hereafter.

The present invention relates to an improved display figure supporting construction comprising magnet means, means for mounting said magnet means relative to a supporting base, a keeper for being selectively engaged by said magnet means, and means for mounting said keeper relative to said display figure, whereby attraction between said keeper and said magnet means can support said display figure relative to said base. In its more specific aspects, the improved supporting construction includes a belt which mounts the keeper on any circular part of the manikin anatomy with sufiicient looseness so that it can move into firm magnetic contact with the magnet. The magnet in turn is mounted on a rod-like link, which can be selectively attachedto a suitable base, such as a wall or any suitable type of standard. The magnet is mounted with a certain degree of looseness so that it too can move to provide firm magnetic contact with the keeper. The link which mounts the magnet relative to the base can be flexible, extensible, or a combination of both to provide the greatest latitude of usage. The present invention will be more fully understood when the following ortions of the specification are read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a manikin being supported by the improved construction of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the manikin of FIG. 2 and showing the supporting construction for the manikin;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary view of a manikin showing an alternate manner in which the improved supporting construction can be mounted on the manikin;

FIG. 4 is a view, partially in cross section, taken substantially along line 4-4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 but showing certain details of construction of the improved supporting construction of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a view partially in cross section taken along line 66 of FIG. 5 and showing the details of a bracket arrangement which may be used for mounting the supporting construction relative to a suitable base;

FIG. 7 is a view of a pole-type of standard which may be used to mount the supporting construction;

FIG. 8 is a view of an alternate type of linkage which may be used to carry the magnet of the supporting construction;

FIG. 9 is a view of a still further type of linkage which may be used to mount the magnet;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary view of an alternate magnet construction;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary perspective view of the arrangement for mounting the keeper on the belt;

FIG. 12 is a view of an alternate embodiment of the present invention taken substantially in the same direction as line 4-4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 13 is a view taken substantially along line 1313 of FIG. 12; and

FIG. 14 is a perspective view of a preferred manner of securing the keepers of FIG. 12 on the belt.

In FIGS. 1 and 2 a manikin 10 is shown in unclothed condition except for stockings 11 and shoes 12. Encircling the waist of the manikin is a fabric belt 13 having a buckle 14 mounted thereon. As is well understood, the belt can be mounted on and removed from the manikin by the use of the buckle. An elongated rectangular keeper 15 of magnetic material, such as soft iron, is loosely mounted on belt 13 by means of a loop of fabric-like material 16, which may be cloth, plastic tape, or the like. Keeper 15 is approximately the width of the belt and of a length to extend fully across the poles of magnet 17. By virtue of the loose connection between belt 13 and keeper 15, the latter can move to a limited degree to provide firm magnetic engagement with magnet 17.

The magnet 17 is loosely mounted at one end of link 18 having its other end secured to bracket 19 which is selectively mountable on wall 20' which can be covered by a decorative curtain 20'. As can'be seen from FIG. 5, link 18 includes a metallic core 21 which is preferably of non-magnetic material, such as brass. The end portion of core 21 extends through hole 22 in the magnet, said hole being larger than core 21 to permit a limited amount of play therebetween, which further enhances alignment between the magnet 17 and keeper 15. A non-magnetic wing nut 23 threads onto end 24 of core 21 to hold magnet 17 against separating from said core. The core 21 has a multiply coating thereon consisting of layers 23 and 24. The purpose of the buildup of a plurality of layers is to provide a shoulder 25, which abuts the outer edge of the magnet to limit movement thereof on core 21. It can thus be seen that the limits of movement of magnet 17 longitudinally on core 21 are defined by the facing portions of wing nut 23 and shoulder 25. In addition, because of the existence of oversized hole 22, a certain amount of lateral movement between core 21 and magnet 17 is realized. While a multi-ply coat has been shown, it will be appreciated that a single ply can be used and the sheath can be fabricated from a suitable plastic tubular material. It is to be noted at this point that link 18 can be bent by digital pressure to assume any desired configuration. The distance of manikin 10 from wall 20 is determined in part by varying the length of link 18 between bracket 19 and magnet 17, and also by positioning bracket 19 in various locations, as will become more apparent hereafter.

At this point it is to be noted that an article of apparel 26 (FIG. 5), such as a dress, slip, leotards, slacks, coat or the like is intended to be mounted on the manikin outside of keeper 15. In other words, keeper 15 is completely covered and the magnetic attraction between magnet 17 and keeper 15 is through the layer of apparel 26. It will be appreciated that this type of supporting engagement obviates any necessity to punch holes in the ap parel or otherwise destroy or distort it incidental to displaying it on the manikin. To terminate engagement between magnet 17 and keeper 15, it is merely necessary to twist the magnet relative to the keeper. It is to be noted that magnet 17 includes a fabric coat 27 which covers all portions thereof, especially the poles which engage the keeper. This is for the purpose of preventing a frictional force between the keeper 15 and magnet 17 when they are twisted relative to each other incidental to effecting their separation, This frictional force could score or even tear a garment 26 in the event that the latter was of the fragile type normally used in lingerie, leotards or expensive dresses. The fabric covering 27 is shown extending over the entire magnet, but, if desired, need only cover the pole pieces thereof, or may be applied to the keeper only. The coating can be applied by floccing or by gluing or by any other suitable type of attachment. For general applications, the coat 27 is not used, but is reserved only for delicate fabrics.

To support the magnet relative to a wall or any other suitable base, the end of link 18 remote from magnet 17 is received in mounting bracket 19, FIGS. 2 and 6. As can be seen, a hole 28 extends longitudinally of the body of bracket 19 and receives an end portion of link 18 therein. A set screw 29 tightens the end portion of link 18 in position. While link 18 is portrayed as round, it will be appreciated that it can be square or of any other non-circular configuration, and in this event, hole 28 would be of a complementary mating configuration to prevent turning of link 18 in hole 28.

Bracket 19 is received in a channel 29 which is suitably secured to wall 20 by any suitable fastening means such as screws 30. Channel 29 includes a pair of leg portions 31 which abut wall 20 and a base portion 32 having spaced slots 33 therein. These slots run longitudinally of base 32 in alignment with each other. A plurality of prongs 34, which are in alignment with each other, extend rearwardly from the body portion of bracket 19 and can be inserted into slots 33 of channel 29. Thereafter, the body portion of bracket 19 is moved downwardly so that the bracket 19 locks in position, as shown in FIG. 6.

As can be seen from FIG. 4, a plurality of channels 29 may be mounted on wall 20 in spaced relation to each other so that the manikin can be supported from any one of these channels. This provides a lateral latitude of placement of manikin 10. In addition, if desired, higher or lower slots 33 in channel 29 may be used so that bracket 19 may be mounted near the top of channel 29 or near the bottom thereof so as to be able to support the manikin in different areas, as by placing the belt 13 around the buttocks or on the thighs or, if desired, around the chest, neck or arms, depending on the type of display which is being used. The foregoing is schematically portrayed in FIG. 3 wherein belt 13 encircles the thigh of the manikin.

In FIG. 8 an alternate linkage for mounting the magnet is shown. This linkage includes an S-shaped tubular portion 35 having one end mounted on a bracket 36 having a wing-nut type of set screw 37 thereon for engaging a circular pole 38 which fits into recess 39 of bracket 36. The other end of S-shaped member 35 receives rigid rod 40 which mounts magnet 17 at its other end in the same manner shown in FIG. 5. A suitable collar may be provided on rod 40 to serve the function of shoulder 25 of FIG. 5. Rod 40 is telescoped into the upper portion 41 of S-shaped member 35 and locked in position by wingnut set screw 42. With a construction such as shown in FIG. 8, the magnet 17 can be moved toward and away from post 38, thereby permitting adjustment of the position of the manikin in a display grouping.

In FIG. 9 a still further type of linkage for supporting magnet 17 relative to a wall is shown. This linkage includes a bracket, such as 19 described in detail relative to FIGS. 5 and 6. Mounted on bracket 19 is a linkage consisting of rigid portion 44, flexible portion 45, rigid portion 46, flexible portion 47 and rigid tubular portion 48, Telescoped into tubular portion 48 is a rod 49 which carries magnet 17 on end 50 thereof. A wing type of lock nut 51 locks rod 49 in position on portion 48. Because of the telescoping connection between portions 49 and 48, the height of magnet 50 can be adjusted. In addi tion, the flexible portion 45 permits relative movement between parts 44 and 46, and flexible portion 47 permits relative movement between parts 46 and 48, so to permit magnet 17 to assume any desired orientation. The flexible portions 45 and 47 may be flexible spiral cable which retains a set.

In FIG. 7 an alternate construction for supporting bracket 29 is shown. This construction consists of a pole 55 having a base 56 which abuts floor 57 and an upper tip 58 which is spring-biased into contact with ceiling 59 by a suitable spring, not shown, housed within body portion 60 and pressing against rod 61 which telescopes into body portion 60. This is the conventional construction used in a pole lamp. The lower portion 62 of body portion 60 is square and has a plurality of slots 133 therein which are in alignment with each other. Slots 133 are identical to slots 33 shows in FIGS. 5 and 6. Furthermore, these slots are located on all four sides of square portion 62 so that a plurality of manikins may be supported from the single unit 55. In other words, a plurality of brackets such as 19 may be mounted on portion 62, either on the same face or on a plurality of faces because each of the four faces of square member 62 contain aligned slots 133.

As can be seen from FIG. 10, the magnet 17 may be modified by providing an elongated hole 53 therein which extends perpendicularly to hole 22 described in detail above. This also permits latitude of orientation of magnet 17.

In FIGS. 12 and 13 an alternate embodiment of the present invention is shown. In this embodiment a belt 55 encircles the waist of manikin and is held in position by buckle 56. A plurality of keepers 57 are spacedly mounted on belt 55 with their longitudinal axes extending substantially perpendicularly to belt 55, but may be oriented otherwise. Keepers 57 are located on the inside of belt 55 so that they press directly against the back 58 of the manikin, rather than beinglocated on the other side of the belt, as in FIG. 5. In other words, keepers 57 are located between the back of the manikin and fabric web belt 55, whereas in FIG. 5 the 'belt 13 is located between the keeper and the back of the manikin. Each keeper 57 is held on belt 55 by a fabric or plastic band 59 which encircles both the keeper and the belt as shown in FIG. 13. However, the preferred form of attachment is shown in FIG. 14 where fabric band 80 encircles both the keeper 57 and the belt 55 in crisscross fashion at the central portion of the keeper.

A plurality of magnets 60 are mounted on non-magnetic, metallic yoke 61 which, in turn, is mounted on a link 18 which may be identical to link 18 of FIG. 2 or may have a configuration of the links shown in FIGS. 8 and 9. The core of link 18 extends loosely through loop 62 on yoke 61 and is held against removal by wing nut 63. The loose connection through loop 62 permits pivotal movement of yoke 61. Magnets 60 are mounted on the opposite ends of yoke 61 and secured against removal 'by nuts 64. As described above relative to FIG. 5, the bores or holes 65 in magnets 60 are larger than the core 66 of yoke 61 so that there is play between magnets 60 and core 66 to provide optimum alignment with keepers 57. Yoke 61 is flexible, but will retain a set, so that it can be bent to any desired position to effect optimum orientation of magnets 60.

The advantage of the construction of FIGS. 12 and 13 is that it provides engagement between two magnets and two keepers at spaced locations, thereby not only greatly increasing the magnetic attraction over a single unit, but also providing a stabilizing effect which tends to obviate tipping of the manikin. Furthermore, because the keepers 57 are held firmly against the back of the manikin, there is less tendency for any type of slight move ment of the manikin which would otherwise be experienced with the embodiments shown in FIGS. 1-5.

It will be appreciated that while the supporting construction is shown relative to a full manikin, it can be used with equal facility relative to a partial manikin, that is, the other upper half of the body, the lower half of the body, or any portion of the body, such as an arm or a leg, which may be used to display hosiery or gloves on a counter top. In addition, it will be appreciated that the instant display figure supporting construction may also be used in conjunction with other supporting constructions to provide added stabilization.

From the foregoing description showing the manner in which the supporting construction engages a manikin, it will be appreciated that the manikin can be clothed with any type of apparel in the same manner as a human without making any allowance whatsoever for the supporting construction, that is, without any interference with the supporting construction which in the past not only distorted clothing and required its destruction in mounting on the manikin, but had also caused various manikins to have an unnatural look because they could not be supplied with socks, shoes or the like. In addition, because of the type of connection which is shown, the manikin can assume any type of desired action pose, such as assumed in skiing, diving, stooping, leaning, running, standing on one foot, or even flying through the air and being supported by the magnet. This provides window designers with a greater latitude for displaying apparel in the manner in which they think would be more commerically appealing. In addition, as noted above, the instant supporting construction can be utilized with any type of manikin, that is, any previous type of manikin can -be converted to this type of mounting construction by merely discarding the previous unsightly base which detracted from the manikin, and mounting the belt with keeper on the manikin. If desired, the manikin can be balanced on its toes or in any other manner so as to obtain any given design effect. The magnet construction provides a much greater supporting force against tipping than is obtainable with conventional bases.

While the magnet has been shown as mounted on the base and the keeper on the manikin, it will be appreciated that a reversal of this mounting is within the scope of the claims.

While preferred embodiments of the present invention have been disclosed, it will be understood that it is not limited thereto but may be otherwise embodied within the scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A display figure supporting construction comprising magnet means, elongated rod-like means for mounting said magnet means in spaced relationship to a supporting base, keeper means for being selectively engaged by said magnet means, and means for mounting said keeper means relative to said display figure comprising belt means for circling a portion of said display figure, whereby attraction between said keeper means and said magnet means can support said display figure relative to said base.

2. A display figure supporting construction as set forth in claim 1 including means for attaching said keeper means to said belt means, and means for permitting a limited movement of said keeper means for effecting alignment with said magnet means to produce good magnetic contact therewith.

3. A display figure supporting construction as set forth in claim 1 including means for attaching said keeper means to said belt means, means for permitting a limited movement of said keeper means for effecting alignment with said magnet means to produce good magnetic contact therewith, and coat means interposed between said magnet means and said keeper means to prevent injury to a portion of a garment lying between said magnet means and said keeper means when said magnet means and said keeper means are moved relative to each other to effect disengagement therebetween.

4. A display figure supporting construction as set forth in claim 1 including means for permitting limited relative movement between said keeper means and said magnet means to provide good magnetic contact therebetween.

5. A display figure supporting construction as set forth in claim 1 including means for attaching said keeper means to said belt means, said elongated rod-like means for attaching said magnet means relative to said base comprising a bendable member having a first portion attached to said magnet means, and a second portion for attachment relative to said supporting base, said means for mounting said keeper means on said display figure including means for permitting limited movement of said keeper means for effecting alignment with said magnet means to produce good magnetic contact therewith, said elongated rod-like means for mounting said magnet means including means for permitting limited relative movement between said magnet means and said means for mounting said magnet means for enhancing alignment between said magnet means and said keeper means to produce good magnetic contact therebetween, said elongated rod-like means for attaching said magnet means relative to a supporting base comprising an extensible member having a first portion attached to said magnet means, a second portion for attachment to said supporting base, and means for permitting the effective distance between said first and second portions to be varied to thereby vary the distance between said display figure and said base.

6. A display figure supporting construction as set forth in claim 5 including coat means interposed between said magnet means and said keeper means to prevent injury to a portion of a garment lying between said magnet means and said keeper means when said magnet means and said keeper means are moved relative to each other to effect disengagement therebetween.

7. A display figure supporting construction comprising magnet means, means for mounting said magnet means relative to a supporting base, keeper means for being selectively engaged by said magnet means, and means for mounting said keeper means relative to said display figure, whereby attraction between said keeper means and said magnet means can support said display figure relative to said base, said magnet means comprising a plurality of spaced magnets and said keeper means comprising spaced keeper means, said means for mounting said magnet means relative to a supporting base comprising a yoke-like member for spacedly mounting said plurality of spaced magnets.

8. A display figure supporting construction as set forth in claim 7 wherein said means for mounting said keeper means relative to said display figure comprises a belt for encircling said display figure and spacedly mounting said spaced keeper means thereon.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,176,052 10/1939 Beyer 132-1 2,642,999 6/ 1953 McPherson 211- 2,784,261 3/ 1957 Anklesaria 179-148 2,950,139 8/1960 Carbaiy 292-2515 647,327 4/1900 Rehlin 46-242 X 1,790,500 1/1931 Fischer 248- 2,270,331 1/1942 Noble 335-285 2,977,082 3/1961 Harris 248-206 3,261,631 7/ 1966 Alessi 292-2515 FOREIGN PATENTS 366,682 2/ 1932 Great Britain.

ROY D. FRAZIER, Primary Examiner F. DOMOTOR, Assistant Examiner US Cl. X.R.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3720394 *May 24, 1971Mar 13, 1973Us NavyRedeye missle gunner stanchion
US3729158 *Jun 14, 1971Apr 24, 1973Nagy DPaint can brush holder
US5398820 *Jan 14, 1994Mar 21, 1995Kiss; Howard M.Doll-holder wall mount
US5480337 *Sep 21, 1994Jan 2, 1996Baker; Jennifer K.Combination diverse doll and educational activity playset method
US5967470 *Sep 2, 1997Oct 19, 1999Guschlbauer; FranzDoll stand
US6257532Mar 30, 2000Jul 10, 2001Betty Jean IvesDoll stand
US6575302Feb 6, 2001Jun 10, 2003Spencer Hart Robley, Jr.Display type packaging system
US7356882 *Nov 22, 2005Apr 15, 2008Guadagno Iv James VMagnetic flower attachment device
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US7958604Jul 10, 2006Jun 14, 2011Mattel, Inc.Packaging tie-downs
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Classifications
U.S. Classification248/206.5, 248/629, 223/66, 248/125.3, 446/268
International ClassificationA47F8/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47F8/00
European ClassificationA47F8/00