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Publication numberUS3513663 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1970
Filing dateMay 8, 1968
Priority dateMay 8, 1968
Publication numberUS 3513663 A, US 3513663A, US-A-3513663, US3513663 A, US3513663A
InventorsFairbanks Edward M, Martin James B Jr
Original AssigneeFairbanks Edward M, Martin James B Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for heating and cooling liquids
US 3513663 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 26, 1970 J. B. MARTIN, JR, ETAL 3,513,663

APPARATUS FOR HEATING AND COOLING LIQUIDS Filed May 8, 1968 II \I INVENTORS JAMES B. MARTIN, JR. EDWARD M. FAIRBANKS ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,513,663 APPARATUS FOR HEATING AND COOLING LIQUIDS James B. Martin, Jr., 2760 NE. 58th St., Fort Lauderdale,

Fla. 33308, and Edward M. Fairbanks, 758 NE. Harbor Drive, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 Filed May 8, 1968, Ser. No. 727,564 Int. Cl. F25b 29/00 US. Cl. 62-159 3 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention contemplates a system for economically heating water in swimming pools and the like which includes the usual components which make up a compression type refrigeration system, i.e., compressor, motor; condenser, expansion valve, and evaporator.

The system of this invention utilizes any suitable refrigerant which is compressed in the compressor and discharged therefrom in a form of vapor under pressure through the condenser into heat, exchanging relation with water from the pool wherein the water is heated and returned to the pool and the hot refrigerant is condensed. This condensed vapor is metered at a controlled rate from the expansion valve into the evaporator where it is vaporized and returned to the compressor for recycling to the condenser.

Sensing means are incorporated in the system for controlling the temperature of the water in the pool by controlling the heat exchange relationship between the water in the pool and the hot gas in the condenser.

Background of invention Many systems presently employed for heating water of a swimming pool, utilize electric, gas, or oil-fired heating units for warming the water. These systems are usually bulky and expensive to operate. In the case of gas oil oil-fired units, there is the additional problem of disposing of the exhaust gases, which is normally accomplished by providing some type of venting, e.g., chimneys or pre-fabricated stacks, which adds considerable cost to the system. These systems also require a source of fuel supply. Moreover, the heating units operate at high temperatures which tend to create corrosion and depositing of minerals in the tubing used for carrying the water. Then to, the problem of possible explosion, fire, or asphyxiation due to leakage of the fuel or exhaust gases, is always present in such systems. 'It is the object of this invention to provide a system which reduces or substantially eliminate-s many of the aforementioned problems.

Briefly, the invention is in a system for raising the temperature of water in a swimming pool to a predetermined heated temperature. The system comprises certain components used in a compression-type refrigeration system such as a compressor, condenser, expansion valve and evaporator. Any suitable refrigerant, e.g. monchlorodifluoromethane is compressed in the compressor, and discharged therefrom as vapor, under pressure, through the condenser into heat exchanging relation with water from the swimming pool. The water is heated and returned to the swimming pool, and the hot refrigerant vapor is condensed. The condensed vapor is metered at a controlled rate from the expansion valve into the evaporator, where it becomes vaporized for return to the compressor and recycling to the condenser. Means are pro vided for sensing the temperature of water in the pool to control the heat exchanging relationship of the water and hot gas in the condenser. Fluid circulated through the evaporator for vaporizing the condensed gas, is naturally 3,513,663 Patented May 26, 1970 ice cooled. It can be appreciated from this brief description that the system can be used to separately heat or cool fluids, or simultaneously heat and cool fluids.

The following description of the invention will be better understood by referring to the annexed drawing, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a sectional view of the apparatus used in the system for heating water from a swimming pool;

FIG. 2 is a schematic drawing of the system for heating water from a swimming pool; and

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of the condenser and evaporator used in said system, said section being taken in the plane indicated by the line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

Referring to the drawing and more particularly to FIG. 2, there is shown a system, generally indicated at 4, for heating water in a swimming pool. The system 4 comprises an apparatus, generally indicated at 6, for heating water from the swimming pool designated at 8. The apparatus 6 will hereinafter for convenience be referred to as a H-C unit, the H and C naturally standing for heating and cooling.

A conventionally designed pump 10 is provided for circulating water from the swimming pool 8, through the H-C unit 6, and back to the pool 8.

A source of fluid, e.g. well 12, is desirable for operating the H-C unit 6. A conventionally designed pump 14 is provided for circulating water from the well 12 through the H-C unit 6. The water is then discharged into a reservoir 16, or some other system for carrying away said water.

The H-C unit 6 essentially comprises a compressor 26; a condenser 22 through which heated refrigerant vapor from the compressor 20 and water from the swimming pool 8, is circulated; an evaporator 24 through which condensed refrigerant vapor from the condenser 22 and water from the well 12, is circulated; an expansion valve 26 from metering condensed refrigerant gas from the condenser 22 into the evaporator 24 at a controlled rate; and electrically operated controls, generally indicated at 28, for automatically controlling the operation of the H-C unit 6, whereby desired temperatures of water in the swimming pool are maintained.

The compressor 20 can be of any suitable design, e.g., a heat pump and air-conditioning compressor manufactured by Tucumseh Products Co. of Ohio. The compressor 20 is provided with an outlet port 30. A high-pressure line or conduit 32 communicating with the condenser 22, is connected to the outlet port 30 of the compressor 20.

The compressor 20 is also provided with an inlet port 34. A suction line or conduit 36 communicating with the evaporator 24, is connected to the inlet port 34 of the compressor 20.

The condenser 22 and the evaporator 24, are preferably, of similar design, each comprising a coil 38 of coaxial tubing 40. As seen in FIG. 3, the coaxial tubing 40 comprises an outer tube 42 with a centrally disposed smaller inner, finned tube 44. Water from the swimming pool 8 and well 12, are circulated through the inner tube 44 in one direction, while refrigerant is circulated in an opposite direction through the space 46 defined between the outer tube 42 and the inner tube 44. Both the inner and outer tubes are preferably formed from corrosion resistant metal.

The condenser 22 is provided with an outlet or discharge port 48. The conduit 32 communicating with the compressor 20 and a pipe 50 leading to the swimming pool 8, are connected to the discharge port 48 of the condenser 22. The condenser 22 is also provided with an inlet port 52. A line or conduit 54 communicating with the expansion valve 26 and a pipe 56 from the swimming pool 8, are connected to the inlet port 52 of the condenser 22.

The pump is disposed in the inlet pipe 56 and acts to pump or circulate water from the swimming pool 8, through the condenser 22, and back into the swimming pool 8 through the return pipe 50.

A strainer-receiver 58 is disposed in the conduit 56 adjacent the expansion valve 26, for holding condensed refrigerant under pressure until it is metered into the evaporator 24.

The expansion valve 26 can be of any suitable design, e.g., an expansion valve of the pressure type manufactured by Alco Controls Corporation of Missouri. The expansion valve 26 is rovided with an inlet port 60 and an outlet or discharge port 62. The conduit 54 from the condenser 22 and strainer-receiver 58, is connected to the inlet port 60. A conduit 64 leading to the evaporator 24, is connected to the outlet port 62 of the expansion valve 26.

The evaporator 24, as previously indicated, similarly comprises a coil 38 of coaxial tubing (FIG. 3). The evaporator 24 is provided with an outlet or discharge port 66. The conduit 64 from the expansion valve 26, and a pipe 68 from the reservoir 16, are connected to the discharge port 66 of the evaporator 24.

The evaporator 24 is also provided with an inlet port 70. The suction line or conduit 36 communicating with the compressor 20, and a pipe 72 leading to the well 12, are connected to the inlet port 70 of the evaporator 24.

Operation of the system For convenience, it will be assumed that water from the swimming pool 8 is circulating through the condenser 22, and water from the well 12 is circulating through the evaporator 24. Further, that the water in the swimming pool 8 requires heating, as its temperature is below that desired.

A thermostat 74 is disposed in heat sensing relation to water flowing in the inlet pipe 56 leading from the pool 8. Since the temperature of the water is below the required temperature, the thermostat 74 coacts with the controls 28 to ope ate, or turn on the compressor 20. The compressor 20 co' presses and heats refrigerant vapor to temperatures, for example, of about 105 F. The compressor 20 discharges heated refrigerant vapor, at high pressure, into the conduit 32 for circulation through the condenser 22. The heated refrigerant vapor and water from the swimming pool 8, are circulated in opposite, segregated, heat exchanging relation through the condenser 22. The water is heated and returned to the swimming pool 8 through the discharge pipe 50. Using a 2 /2 horsepower compressor, for example, water circulated at 12 gallons per minute through the condenser 22, will have its temperature raised from about 75 F. to about 83.5 F. The refrigerant vapor condenses and moves under high pressure into the strainer-receiver 58 and expansion valve 26.

The pressure of the refrigerant is maintained at different levels in the condenser 22 and evaporator 24, of the H-C unit 6, by the compressor 20 at one point, and the expansion valve 26 'at another point. The function of the expansion valve 26 is to allow the refrigerant under high pressure in the strainer-receiver 58, to pass at a controlled rate into the evaporator 24, or low-pressured part of the system. Some of the condensed refrigerant vaporizes the instant it passes from the expansion valve 26, but the greater portion is vaporized in the evaporator 24 at the low pressure, which is maintained by the exhausting action of the compressor 20. The condensed refrigerant is vaporized within the evaporator 24, as it is brought into heat exchanging relation with the water from the well 12. The temperature of the refrigerant leaving the evaporator 24, for example, is about F. The water from the well 12 circulating through the evaporator 24 at the same rate of about 12 gallons per minute, has its temperature lowered, for example, from about 75 F. to about 68 F. Similar to a compression refrigeration system, the vaporizing stage is important to keep liquid refrigerant from being sucked or drawn into the compressor 20.

When water from the swimming pool 8 is at the required temperature, the thermostat 74 coacts with the controls 28 to turn off, or stop operation of the compressor 20, thereby stopping circulation of heated refrigerant vapor through the condenser 22. The operation of the well pump 14, is also shut down to prevent wasting water from the well 12. The pump 10, preferably, continues to circulate water from the swimming pool 8 through the condenser 22 and back to the pool 8. However, the water is not exposed to the hot refrigerant vapor in the condenser 22, since the compressor 20 is shut down. When the temperature of the water drops below the desired temperature, the operation or cycle is repeated.

Similarly, liquid can be cooled to a desired temperature by placing a similar thermostat 74 in communication with fluid flowing in the pipe 72 leading to the evaporator 24.

A typical H-C unit 6 used for heating water from a farily large-sized pool required about 124 gallons per minute, measures about 2 ft. by 2 ft. by 2 ft. Because of its small size the unit is naturally easily installed. Further, the unit has relatively few operating parts outside of the hermetically-sealed compressor, which makes it practically maintenance free as compared to other systems presently used.

The electrical controls 28 have not been described in detail, since it employs conventionally designed components for starting and stopping the compressor and well pump in response to reactions of the thermostat to changes in temperature of the water in the swimming pool. Naturally, means are provided for completely shutting down operation of the system 4, including turning off the pump 10 to discontinue circulation of water through the condenser 22. Thus, there has been described a unique system for heating water from a swimming pool.

We claim:

1. A system for maintaining water in a swimming pool at a predetermined heated temperature, comprising in combination:

(a) a swimming pool for holding water;

(b) a condenser disposed in communicating relation with the pool;

(c) means for circulating water, under pressure, from the pool, through the condenser and back to the pool;

((1) a source of refrigerant vapor;

(e) a compressor disposed in communicating relation with the condenser and source of refrigerant, for increasing the pressure of the refrigerant vapor, whereby the temperature of the vapor is raised to a predetermined temperature higher than the temperature of water in the pool, the compressor circulating heated refrigerant vapor under pressure, through the condenser;

(f) means for circulating water, from the pool, and heated refrigerant vapor, through the condenser in opposed, segregated, heat exchanging relation, whereby the .water is heated and the refrigerant vapor is condensed;

(g) means for maintaining water, from the pool, and heated refrigerant vapor, out of heat exchanging relation in the condenser when water in the pool reaches a predetermined heated temperature;

(h) means for reclaiming condensed refrigerant from th condenser for reuse in the system;

(i) the reclaiming means including means for vaporising condensed refrigerant from the condenser, for return to the compressor and recycling to the condenser;

(j) the vaporizing means including;

(k) a source of fluid at at predetermined temperature higher than the evaporating temperature of condensed refrigerant from the condenser;

(1) an evaporator disposed in communicating relation with the source of fluid, condenser, and compressor;

(m) means for circulating fluid from said source, under pressure through the evaporator;

(11) means for storing, under pressure, condensed refrigerant from the condenser;

(0) means for metering condensed refrigerant from the storage means, at a predetermined controlled rate for circulation through the evaporator at a predetermined lower pressure;

(p) means for circulating fluid and condensed refrigerant through the evaporator in opposed segregated, heat exchanging relation, whereby the fluid is cooled and the condensed refrigerant is vaporized;

(q) the means for circulating water and heated refrigerant through the condenser including coaxial tubing in thecondenser, said tubing comprising an outer tube, and a smaller inner tube concentrically disposed within the outer tube and sealed therefrom; and

(r) the means for circulating fluid and refrigerant through the evaporator including coaxial tubing similar to the coaxial tubing in the condenser. I

2. A system for maintaining water in a swimming pool at a predetermined heated temperature, comprising in combination;

(a) a swimming pool for holding water;

(b) a condenser disposed in communicating relation with the pool; 1'

(c) means for circulating water, under pressure, from the pool, through the condenser and back to the pool;

(d) a source of refrigerant vapor;

(e) a compressor disposed in communicating relation with the condenser and source of refrigerant, for increasing the pressure of the refrigerant vapor, whereby the temperature of the vapor is rlaisedto a predetermined temperature higher than tli'temperature of water in the pool, the compressor circulating heated refrigerant vapor under pressure, through the condenser;

(f) means for circulating water, from the pool, and heated refrigerant vapor, through the condenser in opposed, segregated, heat exchanging relation, whereby the water is heated and the refrigerant vapor is condensed;

(g) means for maintaining water, from the pool, and heated refrigerant vapor, out of heat exchanging relation in the condenser when water in the pool reaches a predetermined heated temperature;

(h) the means for maintaining water and refrigerant out of heat exchanging relation in the condenser includes means for stopping circulation of heated refrigerant vapor through the condenser;

(i) the means for stopping circulation of heated refrigerant vapor through the condenser includes means for sensing heat in water of the pool, and means coacting with the heat sensing means for operating the compressor; and

(j) means for circulating water through the condenser which includes means for continuing circulation of Water through the condenser when the compressor is not operating and circulating refrigerant through the condenser.

3. A system for maintaining water in a swimming pool at a predetermined heated temperature, comprising in combination (a) a swimming pool for holding water;

(b) a condenser disposed in communicating relation with the pool;

(c) means for circulating water, under pressure, from the pool, through the condenser and back to t e pool;

(d) a source of refrigerant vapor;

(e) a compressor disposed in communicating relation with the condenser and source of refrigerant, for

' increasing the pressure of the refrigerant vapor, whereby the temperature of the vapor is raised to a predetermined temperature higher than the temperature of water in the pool, the compressor circulating heated refrigerant vapor under pressure, through the condenser;

(f) means for circulating water, from the pool, and heated refrigerant vapor, through the condenser in opposed, segregated, heat exchanging relation, whereby the water is heated and the refrigerant vapor is condensed;

(g) means for maintainnig water, from the pool, and heated refrigerant vapor, out of heat exchanging relation in the condenser when water in the pool reaches a predetermined heated temperature;

(h) the means for maintaining water and refrigerant out of heat exchanging relation in the condenser ineludes means for stopping circulation of heated refrigerant vapor through the condenser;

(i) the means for stopping circulation of heated refrigerant vapor through the condenser includes means for sensing heat in water of the pool, and means coacting with the heat sensing means for operating the compressor;

(j) means for circulating water through the condenser which includes means for continuing circulation of water through the condenser when the compressor is not operating and circulating refrigerant through the condenser; and

(k) the refrigerant is monochlorodifluoromethane.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS MEYER PERLIN, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification62/159, 62/259.1, 62/228.1, 62/238.6
International ClassificationE04H4/12, F24F5/00, E04H4/00, F25B29/00
Cooperative ClassificationF25B29/003, E04H4/129, F24F5/0071, E04H4/12
European ClassificationE04H4/12C, E04H4/12, F24F5/00H, F25B29/00B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 26, 1985AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: HOLLOWAY, IRENE B. 1660 N.E. 56 STREET FORT LAUDER
Owner name: MALIN, EUGENE F.
Effective date: 19850325
Mar 26, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: HOLLOWAY, IRENE B. 1660 N.E. 56 STREET FORT LAUDER
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:MALIN, EUGENE F.;REEL/FRAME:004386/0252
Effective date: 19850325