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Publication numberUS3513886 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1970
Filing dateMay 6, 1968
Priority dateMay 6, 1968
Publication numberUS 3513886 A, US 3513886A, US-A-3513886, US3513886 A, US3513886A
InventorsCunningham David K, Easter Ross A, Klingl Gary F
Original AssigneePillsbury Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispensing package with reactable propellant gas generating materials
US 3513886 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ay 1970 R A. EASTER ETAL 3,

DISPENSING PACkAGE WITH REACTABLE PROPELLANT GAS GENERATING MATERIALS Filed May 6, 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS 4 TTOPA EV ay 1970 R. A. EASTER ETAL 3,513,886

DISPENSING PACKAGE WITH REACTABLE PROPELLANT GAS GENERATING MATERIALS Filed May 6, 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I N VEN TORS DAV/0 K C'UA/Al/A/Gl/AM,

6' EV FKLM/a F159 Am United States Patent 3,513,886 DISPENSING PACKAGE WITH REACTABLE PROPELLANT GAS GENERATING MATERIALS Ross A. Easter, David K. Cunningham, and Gary F.

Klingl, Minneapolis, Minn., assignors to The Pillsbury Company, Minneapolis, Minn., a corporation of Delaware Filed May 6, 1968, Ser. No. 726,965

Int. Cl. B65b 31/02 U.S. Cl. 141-20 ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A package for dispensing a fluid which is prepared just before use by adding water to a dry, water reconstitutable material (e. g. cake mix or medicinal product). The fluid is expelled by a propellant gas generated just prior to dispensing the contents of the container. The package consists of a pressure retaining container having a dispensing nozzle. In one form of the invention, water is introduced by the consumer and mixed with a dry reactable gas generating material and dry food product within a container. The reactable material can be an acid and a base in dry powdered form which react chemically to produce a propellant gas that becomes mixed with the freshly reconstituted material in the container thereby forcing the fluid out of the container when the nozzle is opened.

The present invention relates to a dispensing package and more particularly to a dispensing package that includes reacta-ble gas generating substances which are re acted chemically by exposing them to one another at the point of use to produce a gas for expelling the product.

Food preparation such as cake mixes, pancake mixes, scrambled egg mix and biological materials such as injectable solutions, hormones and tissue materials, e.g. blood plasma have a relatively short shelf life if stored in a liquid form. On the other hand, if they are stored in the form of a dry powder, their shelf life can be greatly extended. This invention is particularly valuable in connection with dispensing food materials, drug concentrates and the like which are stored Within the container in a powdered, granular or block form under sterile or near sterile conditions.

The cost of shipping water-containing products is due in great part to the large volume of water contained in the product. A potato, for example, is about 95% water. The water that is present in addition to reducing shelf life through microorganism contamination and by promoting undesired degradation reactions greatly increases shipping costs.

In view of these and other deficiencies of the prior art, it is one object of the present invention to provide an improved dispensing package having the following characteristics and advantages: (a) a provision for retaining the contents in dry granular, powdered or tableted condition throughout their entire storage and shipment period; (b) a provision for reducing container costs by making it unnecessary for the package to withstand internal pressure over relatively long periods of time; (c) the provision of a dispensing package in which any selected dry mix can be well preserved during long periods of shipment and storage but at the same time can be expelled through a nozzle as a liquid under pressure at 13 Claims 3,513,886 Patented May 26, 1970 the time it is to be used; (d) a provision for storing and shipping products in granular or powdered form and for facilitating the automatic introduction of a measured volume of water just before the contents are to be dispensed; (e) precise control over the quantity of liquid that is introduced into the package; (f) a provision for initially shipping and storing a product in a dry condition and permitting the consumer to add the required Water.

In accordance with the present invention, a package is provided for shipping and dispensing fluid under pressure. The package consists of a container formed from flexible or rigid gas-tight pressure retaining material. A dispensing nozzle is provided at the top of the container. The dispensing nozzle normally provides a hermetic seal. The nozzle includes a valve element that can be moved between open and closed positions for dispensing the fluid from the container. A liquid or solid product that is to be dispensed as a fluid is placed in the container before the container is to be sealed at the factory. At the time the product is introduced, at least two chemically reactive gas generating materials are placed in the container for producing a gas when reacted at suflicient pressure to expel the contents of the package. The gas generating materials can be in either liquid or solid form or one can be a solid and the other a liquid. A provision must be made to prevent the reactive materials from combining chemically with one another during the storage period and shipment of the container. It can consist of placing the chemically reactive materials in a form such as solid granules which prevents their reaction. Alternatively, a barrier can be provided between the reactive materials. When the reaction is to take place, the barrier is broken by the person using the container just before the contents are to be dispensed. The provision used for maintaining the chemically reactive materials out of chemicalcontact with one another can be thought of as a means for preventing reactable gas generating materials from reacting with one another during storage and shipment of the container.

Generally, the product that is to be dispensed is also in dry form and water is admixed therewith just prior to dispensing the product. Water or other liquid can be provided from either an inner vessel located within the container or from an outside supply.

These and other more detailed and specific objects will be apparent in view of the following specification and accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view partly broken away of a container embodying one form of the invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged vertical cross sectional view of the mouth of the dispensing nozzle in accordance with a modified form of the invention.

FIG. 3 is a diagrarn on a reduced scale illustrating the manner in which the dispensing nozzle of FIG. 2 is employed during the introduction of liquids.

FIG. 4 is a vertical sectional view of another form of package embodying the invention.

FIG. 5 is a partial vertical sectional view of a still further form of the invention.

FIG. 6 is a partial vertical sectional view of the container of FIG. 5 during the mixing operation.

FIG. 7 is a partial vertical sectional view of another form of the invention.

FIG. 8 is a view similar to FIG. 7 illustrating the container during the mixing operation.

FIG. 9 is a partial vertical sectional view of a modified form of dispensing valve in accordance with the invention.

In FIG. 1 is shown a package 10 embodying one form of the present invention. The package consists of a closed cylindrical container 12 which can be formed from sheet metal, plastic or other suitable material. It is not necessarily rigid but must be capable of withstanding internal pressure at least during the dispensing operation as described below. The container has the same general appearance of containers commonly known as aerosol dispensing containers. It includes a filling and dispensing nozzle 14 which consists of a stem or tube 16 having an opening 18 at its free end that communicates through a bore 20 with a plurality of radially spaced openings 22 that are normally closed by a rubber sealing element 24 of known construction. During operation, when the stem 16 of the nozzle 14 is tilted to the side, a slight opening develops between the sealing element 24 and the outer portion of the openings 22 thereby opening the nozzle 14. The nozzle 14 is itself well known and will not be described in further detail. Any of many nozzles known in the art can be used. The nozzle 14 is typical of any of a variety of types of dispensing nozzles that can be employed, the only requirement being that the nozzle provide a hermetic seal and allow the contents to be expelled in the amount desired.

Within the container 12 is a granular or powdered material 30 which can consist, for example, of a dried food product that is to be dispensed. The food product might be a cake mix or a pancake mix. It can also consist of a medicinal preparation or any other dried material that is capable of being reconstituted by the addition of water. While the invention can also be used to dispense materials that are stored and shipped as liquids, it is not as advantageous in that application. Within the container is a chemically reactable dried granular or powdered propellant gas generating material 32. The gas generating material 32 can consist of any of a variety of substances such as a powdered acid and a powdered alkaline material that react together when added to water to form a propellant gas such as carbon dioxide. The list of chemicals that can be used is so numerous that no attempt will be made to list them. However, in many of the tests performed in connection with the invention, stoichiometric quantities of powdered sodium bicarbonate and citric acid were used. In a one pint can, 1.5 grams of sodium bicarbonate can be used with 1.25 grams of citric acid. Enough material 32 should be present to generate at least 10 p.S.i. gauge.

After being filled, the container 12 is evacuated to provide a substantial vacuum therein. The amount of vacuum maintained in the container is dependent upon the volume of air space Within the container and the volume of water that is to be introduced. Of course, if more water is to be introduced the amount of vacuum should be greater. Pressure of about mm. of Hg has been found suitable. With in the container 12 may be provided a mixing body such as a metal ball 34 to facilitate subsequent agitation of the mixture.

By reference to FIG. 2 it will be seen that the nozzle opening 18 may also contain a sealing element such as a suction cup 40 having a concave suction surface 42 and a projection 44 adapted to fit tightly within the opening 18. The sealing element 40 provides an annular seal at 46 that supplements the sealing element 24 thereby reliably maintaining a vacuum within the container 12.

The operation and use with the package will now be described. Before the contents of the container can be expelled, the required amount of water must be added to reconstitute the product 30 and to react the pressure generating chemically reactable materials 32. This is accomplished by introducing water or other liquid through the nozzle 14. Filling can conveniently be accomplished by inverting the package 10 with the opening 18 beneath the surface of the water that is to be added and then pressing the open end of the nozzle 16 laterally to permit the vacuum in container 12 to suck in the required amount of liquid. The package 10 is then shaken as necessary to permit the adequate mixing. During the mixing operation, the material 30 becomes uniformly reconstituted with water and is either dissolved or suspended therein as the case may be while the material 32 reacts chemically to generate a gas that creates a sizable pressure which serves to propel the fluid contents of the container. In most applications of the invention, the fluid contents are expelled immediately after mixing by moving the free end of the nozzle 14 laterally. Solids 30 and 32 while preferably in dry granular or powdered form can be in other forms such as blocks, chunks or pellets. Granular or powdered forms will, however, reconstitute more rapidly when water is added.

If the package 10 contains a pancake mix and the required amount of liquid (Water) is added by the consumer just before the pancakes are to be prepared, the package is then agitated for about one minute to mix the freshly added water with the powdered contents and react the gas generated chemicals. After the pressure has been established, the container is inverted and the nozzle 14 is pressed to the side to expel enough of the contents to form one pancake. The nozzle is then allowed to return to the position as shown in FIG. 1. Each pancake is in turn formed in this manner. In the event all of the batter is not used, the package 10 can be reliably kept in good condition by storing it under refrigeration for several days.

When the sealingelement 40 is used, the container 12 is inverted as shown in FIG. 3 and the element 40 allowed to attach itself to the bottom of a mixing bowl 50 which contains water 52. The suction cup is then pulled out of the opening 18 of nozzle 14 and the nozzle 14 is at the same time tilted towards one side by holding the container 12 on an incline as the sealing element 40 is withdrawn. The vacuum within the container 10 then sucks in the water 52 until it reaches the level indicated by dotted line 35 as seen in FIG. 1. The contents are then mixed and dispensed as described above.

Refer now to FIG. 4 which illustrates another embodiment of the invention. The package 60 of FIG. 4 is in all respects similar to that shown in FIG. 1 and all the corresponding parts have been given the same numerals. In this case, the nozzle 14 functions only for dispensing (it is not used for filling). In addition, the top 62 of the container 12 is removable and is secured to the open top 64 of the lower portion of the container by means of screw threads 66. A hermetic seal is pro vided by an annular resilient sealing gasket 68 which can be formed from a yieldable plastic such as polyethylene.

The package 60 is employed in exactly the same manner as that described in FIG. 1 except that instead of introducing the liquid through the nozzle 14, the liquid is introduced by unscrewing and removing the top 62. A measured quantity, for example, a pint of liquid (usual ly Water) is introduced to bring the level within the container up to the line 35. The top 62 is then replaced and screwed tightly into position. The sealing ring 68 provides a gas-tight seal so that when the material 32 reacts, the propellant gas that is generated will be held under pressure within the package 60. The contents are then dispensed as described above.

Refer now to FIGS. 5 and 6 which illustrate another embodiment of the invention. The package 70 of FIGS. 5 and 6 is provided with the same dispensing valve 14 and corresponding parts have all been designated with the same numerals as in FIG. 1. In this embodiment, however, unlike that described in FIG. 1, the liquid that is to be added to the solid contents to reconstitute them for use is provided within a sealed package inside the container 12 which consists of a punch 72 formed from a flexible material such as plastic film or the like bonded at both ends along seal lines 74 and 76 to thereby retain the liquid 78 therein hermetically sealed within the pouch 72 during the shipment and storage period and unmixed with the dry solids 30 and 32. Package 70 is pressurized with a gas which is soluble within the liquid contained in the pouch 72 and the pouch 72 is itself formed from a plastic or other material that is permeable to the gas under pressure. Thus, if carbon dioxide is used, it can be provided at a pressure of from about 10 to 15 lbs. per square inch. The pouch 72 can in this case be formed, for example, from 2 mil polyethylene film. Within a short period of time after the container has been pressurized, the compressed carbon dioxide will begin to diffuse slowly through the wall of the pouch and will become dissolved in the water contained therein. Because of the restraining pressure of the gas in the package 70, there will be no pressure differential across thewall of the pouch 72.

When the container of FIGS. 5 and 6 is to be used, the nozzle 14 is again tilted to one side as shown in FIG. 6 thereby releasing the compressed air or other gas through the nozzle 14. The sudden release of the gas from the package 70 will cause the gas within the pouch 72 to come out of solution with a sudden force which rips open the pouch 72 as shown in FIG. 6 thereby releasing the water therein allowing it to mix with the contents 30 and 32. The powdered solids 30 then become reconstituted in the chemically reactable materials 32 again to produce a propellant gas described above after the liquid and solid components become thoroughly mixed. The contents of the container are then expelled as described in connection with FIG. 1.

Refer now to FIGS. 7 and 8 which illustrate another embodiment of the invention with the same parts being given corresponding numbers. In this instance the package designated 80 is provided with a pouch 82 formed from leak-proof flexible plastic material sealed at each end along lines 84 and 86 to provide an air-tight seal. Also provided within the pouch 82 is a dissolved gas under pressure. The pressure of the gas within the pouch is opposed by the external counter-pressure of a compressed gas within the container 12, and it is in this condition that the package 80 is shipped and sold.

While the package 80* can be produced in various ways, it is conveniently made by placing a powdered, 'stoichiometric quantity of chemically reactive gas generating chemicals within the pouch 82 adding a quantity of liquid (typically water) to the pouch then immediately sealing the container along line 84 and quickly dropping the seal pouch 82 into the can. The overriding compensating pressure is then applied by introducing compressed air or other gas through the nozzle 14 before the chemicals within the pouch 82 have an opportunity to fully react. During the next few minutes or hours, the reaction in package 80 is completed but the pouch 82 is reliably prevented from bursting due to the overriding pressure of the compressed gas within the package 80.

When the container 80 is to be used, the nozzle 14 is tilted as shown in FIG. 8 thereby releasing the compressed overriding gas pressure from the container 12. The sudden reduction in external pressure causes the pouch 82 to burst as shown in FIG. 8 thus mixing the liquid contained therein with the powdered product 30 and the chemically reactive propellant gas generating materials 32. Mixing and dispensing is then accomplished as described above.

Refer now to FIG. 9 which shows a modified form of the valve in accordance with the invention. In FIG. 9 is shown a valve 90 consisting of a hollow stem 92 having an outlet opening 94 that is initially sealed (i.e. during shipment and storage) by means of a resilient sealing element such as a rubber ball 96 secured to a pin 98 that extends through the center of the sleeve 92 and has connected to its other end a similar sealing element 100 spaced inwardly from a valve outlet opening 102 at the lower end of the sleeve 92. The sleeve 92 is held in position by a rubber sealing element 104 including a sleeve 106 and a lateral enlargement or head 108 that seals circumferentially distributed outlet openings 110, except when the stem 92 is tilted to the side. A weak compression spring 112 is secured between a stop 114 rigidly affixed to the pin 98 and the lower end of the stem 92. Before shipment a vacuum is established within the container 120. The vacuum normally maintains the sealing element 96 in its seated position sealing the opening 94.

When the valve of FIG. 9 is to be used, the container is inverted in a vessel, such as that shown in FIG. 3, containing water or other liquid. The sealing element 96 is then pressed against the bottom of the vessel. Lateral pressure on the sealing element 96 will cause it to be displaced slightly to the side of the nozzle opening 94 thereby allowing the vacuum to draw the water in the vessel into the container 120. As soon as the liquid is drawn into the vessel, the weak spring 112 will seat element 100 in opening 102. The valve is then operated conventionally by tilting it to the side as required so as to intermittently and selectively unseal the openings 110.

The invention is susceptible to numerous modifications. For example, it is unnecessary for the main container body 12 to be formed from rigid material such as metal or plastic sheet. It can, for example, be formed from a flexible plastic pouch such as a pouch formed from a Mylar and polyethylene film laminate heat sealed along its edges to provide a hermetic seal and having a nozzle of any suitable construction sealed within the wall there of that serves as dispensing outlet. In the event a flexible pouch of this type is employed, the liquid portion of the contents can be contained within an inner pouch that is capable of being broken by applying manual pressure to the outside of the outer pouch. If desired, the pouch can be held in a paperboard folding carton which will provide added strength. The liquid and solid contents can then be mixed by shaking or kneading and thereafter expelled by opening the nozzle as required. Since a pouch of this construction need withstand pressure for only a short period of time, it can withstand the requisite propulsion pressure although it is light in weight and low in cost compared to a can.

EXAMPLE I A package is prepared using the containers embodied in FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 4. The container has the capacity of 1 pint. The can measures 2 in. x 41 in. Into this can is placed grams of a self-leavened angle food cake mix in dry form having the formula set forth in Table 1 below. The formula shown in the table includes the chemically reactive gas generating materials.

The can is either evacuated as described in connection with FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 to a vacuum of about 400 mm. of mercury or is allowed to remain at atmospheric pressure inaccordance with FIG. 4. When the package is to be used, 144 grams of water are added. The package is then shaken for a period of about 30 seconds to 90 seconds. During this period of time the acid will react with the soda thereby generating C0 The cake mix is expelled by pressing the nozzle to one side in the usual manner.

7 EXAMPLE 11 A pancake mix is prepared by admixing the ingredients listed below in Table 2. One hundred and twenty grams of this mix are placed in a container as described in Example I. When the mix is to be reconstituted 110 grams of water are added.

TABLE 2 Percent Flour 77.0 Sugar 2.8 Non-fat dry milk solids 2.8 Soda 4.2 Anhydrous mono calcium phosphate 2.6 Citric acid 1.6 Salt 1.8 Dry egg yolk 6.4 Dry albumin .8

EXAMPLE III A package is prepared in accordance with the embodiments of FIGS. 7 and 8. The container is of the same size as that described in Example I and contains the same dry ingredients. The pou'ch within the outer container is filled with 144 grams of water, 1.5 grams of sodium bicarbonate and 1.25 grams of citric acid. As soon as these ingredients are added to the pouch, the pouch is quickly sealed and dropped into the outer container. The outer container is then closed, sealed and pressurized with compressed air to a pressure of about 1 atmosphere, i.e. 35 p.s.i. gauge. The pouch consists of 1% mil polyethylene film.

EXAMPLE IV A dispensing package is prepared in accordance with FIGS. and 6. The package includes a dry powdered scrambled egg mix having the formulations set forth in Table 2 below. The chemically reactive gas generating materials are included in the formula.

TABLE 3 Dry ingredients: Percent by weight Egg yolk 62.3 Egg albumin 8.6 Non-fat milk 13.4 Spray dried butter 10.0 Sodium bicarbonate 3.1 Citric acid 2.6

The pouch within the container consists of 1% mil polyethylene film and contains 144 grams of water. The package is pressurized with carbon dioxide gas to a pressure of about 50 p.s.i. gauge.

During the normal storage and shipment period of the package, the compressed carbon dioxide will difiuse through the polyethylene film layer into the water contained therein and will become dissolved within the pouch. When the contents of the package are to be mixed, the upper end of the package is opened thereby reducing the pressure within the package to atmospheric pressure. As this takes place the dissolved carbon dioxide within the pouch will be rapidly evolved thereby bursting the pouch and allowing the water to become mixed with the dry, powdered solids. As the water becomes mixed with the chemically reactive gas generating components, carbon dioxide is evolved with sufiicient pressure to expel the scrambled egg mix. As in the prior examples mixing is accomplished by shaking the package. The package should be allowed to stand after it is mixed for a period of about 30 seconds to allow the reaction to become at least nearly complete before the contents are expelled.

It is apparent that many modifications and variations 8 of this invention as hereinbefore set forth may be made without departing from the spirit and scope thereof. The specific embodiments described are given by way of example only and the invention is limited only by the terms of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A package for the shipment and pressurized dispensing of edible products in fluid form comprising in combination a container, said container being formed from a gas-tight pressure retaining material, a dispensing nozzle in said container for normally providing a hermetic seal, said nozzle including a valve element that can be moved between open and closed positions for dispensing the fluid from the container, a dry edible product within said container, at least two chemically reactive edible materials in the container and being composed of substances adapted to react together to generate a gas at a pressure at least sufficient to expel said product from the container when the nozzle is opened and means preventing the reactable gas generating materials from reacting with one another during storage and shipment of the container whereby the reaction of said chemically reactive edible materials just before said product is to be dispensed will produce a propellant gas in the container.

2. The package of claim 1 wherein the edible chemi cally reactive gas generating materials comprise an acid and a base.

3. The package of claim 1 wherein the chemically reactive edible material are in dry granular form and water is placed in the container to facilitate said reaction.

4. The package of claim 1 wherein the product is in dry granular form and a means is provided to facilitate the admixing of Water with the contents of the package immediately before the product is to be dispensed.

5. The package according to claim 1 wherein the reactive materials comprise stoichiometric quantities of sodium bicarbonate and citric acid.

6. The package of claim 1 wherein said dispensing nozzle includes a pair of sealing elements formed from a resilient material, said sealing elements comprising an inner sealing element and an outer sealing element that is visible from the outside of the container and is mounted upon the dispensing valve for removal from the exterior of the package.

7. The package of claim 1 wherein the dispensing valve comprises an elongated hollow stem secured to the package, said stem having an inner opening at the inner end thereof and an outer opening at the outer end thereof each communicating with a hollow center portion of the stem, inner and outer sealing elements positioned outside of the stern adjacent the openings, a pin connecting the sealing elements and extending through the hollow center portion of the stem and resilient means yieldably biasing the pin and the sealing elements in a direction away from the center of the container and adapted to seat the inner sealing element on the inner opening.

8. The package of claim -1 wherein the product and the chemically reactive materials are in a substantially dry form and the container is evacuated to facilitate the introduction of a liquid therein when the dispensing valve is opened.

9. The package of claim 1 wherein the product and the chemically reactive materials are in substantially dry form and the container includes a removable cover to facilitate the introduction of a liquid therein for reconstituting the product and reacting the chemically reactive materials.

10. The package of claim 1 wherein the product and chemically reactive materials are in a substantially dry form and the package contains a breakable vessel therein holding a quantity of a liquid adapted to reconstitute the dry product and react the chemically reactive materials.

11. The package of claim 10 wherein the container is filled with a gas under pressure, the vessel is formed from a gas permeable membrane and the liquid within the vessel is capable of dissolving said gas whereby gas under pressure within the container will diffuse through the wall of the vessel, become dissolved in liquid thereby causing the vessel to burst when the gas under pressure within the container is released.

12. The package according to claim 1 wherein there is provided within the container a vessel holding a quantity of a liquid containing a pressurized gas and the container is filled with a second compressed gas to provide a compensating overriding pressure on the vessel to prevent the vessel from being broken open by the pressure therein.

13. The package according to claim 12 wherein chemically reactive gas generating materials are placed in the vessel for producing said pressurized gas.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,363,009 12/1920 Pearsons 16932 1,458,822 6/1923 Halter 9322 1 0 2,965,270 12/ 1960 Soffer et a1 222-40222 3,255,926 6/1966 Modderno 222-40222 X 1,830,894 11/1931 Ustrand et a1 141-61 X 2,015,972 10/ 1935 Sodergren 99171 2,849,323 8/ 1958 Young 99189 2,874,734 2/1959 Luckock et a1 141-356 X 2,967,776 1/1961 Utley 99-171 2,977,231 3/1961 Fox et al 99189 X 3,272,387 9/ 1966 Katz et a1 222-48 ROBERT B. REEVES, Prirnaly Examiner N. L. STACK, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

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EP2037744A4 *Jun 8, 2007May 22, 2013Blaster Food Technologies LpRefrigerator stable pressurized baking batter
EP2926656A4 *Dec 3, 2013Aug 3, 2016Earth Chemical CoDevice for spraying powdery chemical agent and process for spraying powdery chemical agent
Classifications
U.S. Classification426/115, 426/120, 426/126, 426/614, 222/402.22, 141/20, 426/555, 426/561
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/46, B65D83/625, B65D83/666
European ClassificationB65D83/66D, B65D83/62C