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Publication numberUS3514047 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1970
Filing dateOct 9, 1968
Priority dateOct 9, 1968
Publication numberUS 3514047 A, US 3514047A, US-A-3514047, US3514047 A, US3514047A
InventorsHoward R De Mallie, Thomas J Perconti
Original AssigneeEastman Kodak Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic winding method and device
US 3514047 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May '26, 1970 H; R. DE MALLIE ETAL v 3,514,047

AUTOMATIC WINDING,METHOD AND DEVICE Filed Oct. 9, 1968 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 HOWARD R. DEMALL/E moms J. PERCONT/ I N VEN TORS WWV Q/Ik/ ATTU/PNE HAGE/VT y 1970 H. R. DE MALLIE ETAL 3,514,047

AUTOMATIC WINDING METHOD AND DEVICE Filed Oct. 9, 1968 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 THOMAS J PE RC ON 7'/ INVENTORS MNM BY I, a

A TTORNEfi AGE/VT HOWARD R. DtrMALL/E.

May '26, 1970 H. R. DE MALLIE ETAL 3,514,047

AUTOMATIC WINDING METHOD AND DEVICE 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Oct. 9, 1968 HOWARD R DEMALL/E THOMAS J. PERCO/VT/ INVENTO S w ATTOR/VE 8 AGE/V7" United States Patent Office 3,514,047 Patented May 26, 1970 3,514,047 AUTOMATIC WINDING METHOD AND DEVICE Howard R. De Mallie and Thomas J. Perconti, Rochester,

N.Y., assignors to Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, N.Y., a corporation of New Jersey Filed Oct. 9, 1968, Ser. No. 766,187 Int. Cl. B65h 17/12, 19/18 US. Cl. 242-66 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The present invention relates to surface winding and, more particularly to automatic winding methods and apparatus.

It is well known in the art of winding that rolls can be wound by nesting them between two winding drums. It is often the practice to initiate a roll by nesting a core member betweent the drums and to cinch a web about the core prior to winding. Once the roll is wound to the desired diameter, the trailing end of the web is usually manually taped, or otherwise attached to the roll, so that the roll can be handled further without unrolling. After the taped-down roll is removed from the driving nest, another core is placed therein and the above procedure repeated. After repeated windings, some winding drums tend to become soiled from the supplied webs. In certain instances, the winding drums must be cleaned manually to maintain proper quality standards.

While the above procedures are often acceptable, it should be apparent that the manual operations involved may be economically unacceptable in certain situations such as when a multiplicity of narrow webs, supplied from a device which slits a wide web, are simultaneously wound into rolls.

Accordingly, an object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus for automatically introducing a core into the nest of a surface winding device, cinching an end of a web around the core, winding a roll, and ejecting the wound roll from the nest.

Another object of the invention is to provide an automatic method of taping down the trailing end of a wound roll.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a method for automatically cleaning the drums and follower roll of a surface winder.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a unitized windup device which can be used with a multiplicity of similar windup devices and can be easily and rapidly replaced in the event it malfunctions.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art by description of a preferred embodiment of the invention which follows.

The objects of the present invention are accomplished by means which eject a wound roll from the Winder as it places another core into the nest of the winder, which means also holds the core in the nest while the leading end of a succeeding web is guided and cinched onto the core. The eject means and the winding drums are mounted in a housing to provide a unitized windup device. Further, means are provided for unwinding a spliced leading end of a succeeding web which has been wound onto the outer convolution of a finished wound roll. The splice of the trailing end of the wound roll to the leading end of a succeeding web is accomplished in such a manner that when the leading end is unwound from the roll, the trailing end of the wound roll is left attached to the roll and the leading end of the succeeding web is ready for cinching on another core. The trailing end is adhesively attached to the Wound roll in such a manner that it presents an adhesive cleaning surface which, when the roll is rotated pri r to ejection, cleans soiling matter which may have accumulated on the winding drums and follower roll.

Reference is now made to the accompanying drawing wherein like reference numerals and characters designate like parts and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a schematic view of a web slitting machine in conjunction with a plurality of unitized windup devices.

FIG. 2 is a side view, with portions broken away, of an individual unitized windup device as shown in outline in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 3--3 in FIG 2 FIGS 4A, 4B and 4C schematically illustrate respectively: the tape-down technique for the trailing end of a finished roll; the use of an adhesive surface on the wound roll to clean the driving drums and follower roll; and, the cinching of a succeeding web onto a core With particular reference to FIG 1, a plurality of unitized windup devices 2 are shown These devices wind narrow webs or strips S supplied from slitting machine 1. The slitting machine includes a wide-web supply roll R. The wide web W is slit into a plurality of strips S by slitter knives 3. When a wide-web roll is near expiration, the operation of the slitting machine is stopped the web W is cut at the splice board B and a new wide-web roll R is spliced to the trailing end of the web which is about to go through the slitter knives 3. Then the slitting machine is started up again. Between the slitter machine and windup devices, the strips S normally pass over rolls 4 and 5. However, the rolls 4 and 5 are movable to positions 4' and 5' at certain times in the operating cycle of the windup devices. This will be described in more detail in a later paragraph.

FIGS. 2 and 3 illustrate the details of the unitized windup devices 2. Only the portions of these devices which are needed for understanding the present invention will be described here. However, for further details of the construction and operation of the windup device, reference may be made to the specification of our copending US. application Ser. No. 766,241, filed Oct. 9, 1968, and entitled Surface Winding Device. We intend that the description in that application be incorporated by reference into the present description.

The unitized windup device 2 includes a drive drum 6 and an idler drum 7 which form a nest for core 8 which is automatically inserted to initiate the winding cycle. Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, assume at the time a splice is made, each of the windup devices 2 contain a fully wound roll 9. In other words, a supply roll R has been completely split into rolls 9. After the splice is made, i.e. roll R is joined to R011 R, the splice passes through the machine, wherein it is slit and directed by suitable guide rolls 10, 10' it being then wound into each of the finished wound rolls. The machine is stopped after the splice is wound approximately twelve inches into the wound roll. FIG. 4A illustrates this point of the cycle. The rolls 4 and 5, separate from the windup devices as shown in FIG. 1, are then moved by motor-driven carriages to positions 4' and 5' to create tension to pull off the previously-wound leading end portion from the roll 9. The path of the strip S is around the lower circumference of the idler roll 7 and onto the finished wound roll 9. As the twelve inch portion of strip S is withdrawn from the roll, as shown in FIG. 4A, the leading end of the succeeding strip is peeled off the splicing tape T. The splicing tape, through contact pressure with the idler drum 7 as it is wound into the roll, is firmly attached at A to the outer convolution of the roll. The leading end of the succeeding strip, after being pulled from a portion the splicing tape T (as will be appreciated later), remains in the lower strip chute 11 as seen in FIG. 4B.

The succeeding strips leading end is held in the chute 11 by pinch roll 12 which has previously moved to press the strip against the idler drum 7. The pinch roll movement is initiated by rotating the top guide 13 a few degrees in a clockwise direction prior to withdrawal of the leading end from the wound roll to separate the splice. The complete interaction of the top guide 13 and pinch roll 12 is described in a later paragraph.

After the finished wound roll 9 is firmly taped down, and the splice separated, the drive drum 6 is rotated approximately 75 revolutions at a relatively slow speed. Rotation of the drive drum 6 rotates the finished wound roll 9, and the splicing tape T contacts the drive and idler drum surfaces and the follower roll at a multiplicity of places as shown in FIG. 4B. A portion T of the splicing tape T is tacky, as seen in FIG. 4B, and a portion of this tacky surface effectively picks up soiling matter accumulated during the winding of the roll. This automatic drumcleaning sequence insures the repeated winding of rolls without requiring undue interruption for manual cleaning.

To eject the finished and taped roll, the top guide 13 is further rotated in a clockwise direction by means of gearing 14 about the center of the drive drum 6. Roller 15, fastened to the top guide 13, and core 8, cam the Wound roll 9 over the idler drum 7 and out of the windup device to a suitable receiver (not shown). All of the finished rolls 9 are cammed out of the plurality of windup units at the same time. At the completion of the ejection cycle, the top guide 13 has guided another core 8 into the nest between the drive and idler drums 6 and 7, respectively. The top guide 13 is also in the thread-up position at position :13. Rotation of the top guide to this new position 13 acts to release pinch roll 12 which then is loaded by a spring 16 against the succeeding strip contained in the lower chute 11. The leading end of the succeeding strip is then firmly forced against the idler drum 7.

The slitting and windup machine is now started and the drive drum 6 is rotated. Through surface friction, the drive drum rotates the core 8, and it in turn rotates the idler drum 7. As shown in FIG. 4C, the leading end L of each succeeding strip, held in positive contact with the idler drum by pinch roll 12, is advanced to each core 8, and around the circumference guided by top and bottom guide surfaces. The succeeding strip is then cinched onto the core, and after several laps have been wound, the top guide 13 is rotated counter-clockwise, back to its rest position. With the return of the top guide 13, the lever-mounted pinch roll '12 is cammed away by pin 17 from the strip S wrapped on the lower portion of idler drum 7. Also with the return of top guide 13, a core 8 is dropped into the core-holder on the guide for the next cycle. The slitter continues to run, and the strip is wound onto the core 8. When the roll is about 6 inches in diammeter, the follower roll 18 is picked up and carried by the periphery of the winding roll 9. The strip continues to wind and the cleaning, ejecting, and cinching cycles are repeated when the desired footage is reached and a new splice prepared.

FIG. A schematically illustrates the tape-down of the finished wound rolls and 5B shows the splicing tape T which is used at the splicing board B to splice the trailing end of the expiring web roll R to the leading end of a succeeding web roll R. As is seen in FIG. 5B, the splice tape T has a top surface portion T which is adhesivecoated and a bottom portion T, also coated. The top surface portion T, as best appreciated from FIG. SA, has both the trailing edge of roll IR and the leading edge of roll R stuck to it in butt-splice relationship. The bottom portion T" also has an area where an uncoated lift ta'b T' is created. FIG. 5A shows a view of the automatic tape-down which has been previously described in connection with FIG. 4A. The adhesive surface used on the splice tape is pressure-sensitive and nontransferable to the elements of the winding device or preceding equipment. This insures that the various cycles are accomplished without undesired clogging of the elements of the apparatus.

From the above description, it should be appreciated that a plurality of unitized windup devices 2 can be used to simultaneously produce wound rolls. As is best seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, all of the components of each windup device are mounted within an individual housing H. The unitization of the windup units 2 decreases the time that the slitting and winding machine is shut down in case of a malfunction of one of the windup devices 2. If, for ex ample, 50 strips are being wound simultaneously and one device malfunctions, then that one device can be replaced with a spare device without disturbing the other 49.

In one installation, where a plurality of windup devices have been used to wind photographic film strips in a darkened room, it was found desirable to incorporate a sensing means to indicate a malfunction of a unitized windup device. For example, if a core 8 does not properly seat in the nest between the Winding drums 6 and 7, then automatic cinching, as shown in FIG. 40, may not take place in that device. Such a condition should be sensed immediately to avoid further operation of the slitting and winding machine until it is corrected. A means is incorporated into each windup device 2 which indicates the presence or absence of tension on the strip S leading to the core. If tension is absent, or below the desired level, then the sensing means automatically stops operation of the slitting and winding machine. The details and construction of a preferred tension-sensing means is disclosed in copending US. application Ser. No. 766,242, filed Oct. 9, 1968, and entitled Tension Sensing Device. We intend that the description in that application be incorporated by reference into the present disclosure.

The invention has been described in detail with particular reference to preferred embodiments thereof, but it will be understood that variations and modifications can be effected within the spirit and scope of the invention as described hereinabove and as defined in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. In a method which includes the steps of convolutely winding a length of web to form a roll and attaching the trailing end of the web to the outer convolution of the roll, the improvement comprising the steps of:

adhesively splicing said trailing end to the leading end of a succeeding length of web to releasably join said trailing and leading ends prior to winding said ends onto said roll;

winding said joined ends onto said roll;

adhesively attaching said trailing end to said outer convolution; and

unwinding said leading end to disconnect the same from said trailing end leaving said trailing end adhesively attached to said outer convolution.

2. In a method which includes the step of convolutely winding a length of Web to form a roll having contact with the peripheral surface of at least one rotatable drum, the improvement comprising the steps of:

providing the outer convolution of said roll with an exposed adhesive surface; and

contacting the peripheral surface of said drum with said adhesive surface by rotating the roll and the drum to transfer soiling matter on the drums surface to said adhesive surface.

3. In a method which includes the steps of convolutely winding a length of web to form a roll having contact with the peripheral surface of at least one rotatable drum,

and attaching the trailing end of the web to the outer convolution of the roll, the improvement comprising the steps of:

securing an adhesive surface to the outer convolution of said roll at the same time said trailing end is attached thereon; and

contacting the peripheral surface of said drum with said adhesive surface by rotating the roll and the drum so that soiling matter on the drums surface transfers to said adhesive surface.

4. In a method which includes the steps of convolutely winding a length of web to form a roll having contact with the peripheral surface of at least one rotatable drum, and attaching the trailing end of the web to the outer convolution of the roll, the improvement comprising the steps of:

adhesively splicing said trailing end to the leading end of a succeeding length of web with an adhesive on the first side of a splice tape having adhesive on two sides to releasably join said trailing and leading ends prior to winding said trailing end onto said roll;

winding said joined ends and splice tape onto said roll to adhesively attach said splice tape to said outer convolution with an adhesive on the second side of said splice tape;

unwinding said leading end to disconnect the same from the first side of said splice tape and to expose the adhesive on said first side while leaving said trailing end adhesively attached to said outer convolution by the adhesive on said second side; and

contacting the surface of said drum with said exposed adhesive on said first side by rotating the roll and the drum to transfer soiling matter on the drums surface to said exposed adhesive surface.

5. A surface winding apparatus having a pair of drums which form a nest for receiving a first core and for winding on said core a first length of web and the leading end of a succeeding length of web attached to the trailing end of said first length of web, means for ejecting a wound roll of said first length of web from said nest and for introducing a second core into said nest for Winding said succeeding length of web on said second core; and

means for unwinding the leading end of said succeeding length of web from the wound roll of said first web to detach said leading end from said trailing end prior to the ejection of the wound roll of said first web from said nest.

6. The invention of claim 5 further comprising:

means for engaging said succeeding length of Web with one of said drums after said leading end is detached from said trailing end to advance said leading end toward said second core in said nest; and

means for guiding said leading end around said second core in the nest to Wind the leading end thereon.

7. The invention of claim 5 wherein said unwinding means includes a roll for engaging said succeeding length of web, and means for moving said roll to produce unwinding tension in said leading end for detaching the same from said trailing end.

8. The invention of claim 6 wherein said core-introducing and ejecting means comprises an arm mounted to rotate about the axis of rotation of one of said drums, a roller mounted on the outer end of said arm to contact a Wound roll during ejection thereof, and a core-holding meanslocated along the length of said arm to support said second core during its introduction into said nest and to guide said leading end during winding on said second core.

9. The invention of claim 8 wherein said web-engaging means comprises a pinch roller mounted for controlled movement in response to said core-introducing means such that the pinch roller is engaged with said web while said leading end is being initially wound onto said second core and said roller is disengaged during further winding of the succeeding length of web into a roll.

10. The invention of claim 9 wherein said drums, said core-introducing and ejecting means, and said web-engaging means are mounted in one housing to provide a unitized construction.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,989,262 6/1961 Hornbostel 242-66 XR 2,992,447 7/1961 Hicks 15-210 3,069,815 12/1962 Valentine 15-210 XR 3,072,354 1/1963 Giles et a1 242-584 3,245,861 4/1966 Roshkind 242-585 XR 3,279,717 10/1966 Schubert 242-58.4 3,286,808 11/1966 Arena et a1 242-585 XR 3,393,105 7/ 1968 Tellier 242-66 XR STANLEY N. GILREATH, Primary Examiner W. H. SCHROEDER, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2989262 *May 19, 1958Jun 20, 1961Beloit Iron WorksCounter roll winder
US2992447 *Apr 9, 1957Jul 18, 1961Hicks Iv JohnMagnetic head cleaning tape
US3069815 *Oct 2, 1958Dec 25, 1962IbmCleaning tape for information sensing apparatus
US3072354 *May 18, 1960Jan 8, 1963Nu Roll CorpWeb supplying and replacing apparatus
US3245861 *Mar 24, 1961Apr 12, 1966Dick Co AbWeb splicer
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3848979 *Oct 31, 1973Nov 19, 1974Polaroid CorpSelf-cleaning photographic transparency processing and projection system
US5226611 *Jan 16, 1992Jul 13, 1993C. G. Bretting Manufacturing Co., Inc.Twin station rewinder
US5248107 *Mar 4, 1992Sep 28, 1993Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Web winder for winding up web on core and method of automatically wrapping leading end portion of web around core
US7008364Sep 27, 2002Mar 7, 2006C.G. Bretting Manufacturing Company, Inc.Sheet folding apparatus and method
US7175127Aug 26, 2004Feb 13, 2007C.G. Bretting Manufacturing Company, Inc.Rewinder apparatus and method
US7758486Feb 2, 2006Jul 20, 2010C.G. Bretting Manufacturing CompanySheet folding apparatus and method
US20040063559 *Sep 27, 2002Apr 1, 2004Ochsenbauer Edward R.Sheet folding apparatus and method
US20050087647 *Aug 26, 2004Apr 28, 2005Butterworth Tad T.Rewinder apparatus and method
US20060154795 *Feb 2, 2006Jul 13, 2006C.G. Bretting Manufacturing Company, Inc.Sheet folding apparatus and method
DE10121679A1 *May 4, 2001Nov 7, 2002Voith Paper Patent GmbhRoll winding assembly, at a papermaking or cardboard production machine, has a cleaning unit to scrape or brush clinging matter and/or ink from the core mantle surface
EP0502522A1 *Mar 5, 1992Sep 9, 1992Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Web winder for winding up web on core and method of and system for automatically wrapping leading end portion of web around core in winder
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/532, 242/542.4, 15/100, 242/533.2, 15/210.1, 242/580, 242/542, 242/556.1, 242/533.1
International ClassificationB65H19/29, B65H19/22, B65H19/10
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2301/41814, B65H2301/41486, B65H19/2284, B65H2301/4148, B65H19/102, B65H19/29, B65H19/2276
European ClassificationB65H19/22D, B65H19/29, B65H19/22C, B65H19/10A