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Publication numberUS3514626 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1970
Filing dateOct 16, 1968
Priority dateOct 16, 1968
Publication numberUS 3514626 A, US 3514626A, US-A-3514626, US3514626 A, US3514626A
InventorsPlatzer George E Jr
Original AssigneePlatzer George E Jr, Lon H Romanski
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Switching circuit
US 3514626 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G- E. PLATZER, JR 3,514,626

SWITCHING CIRCUIT May 26, 1970 Filed Oct. 16, 1968 3 Sheets-Sheet l I N VENTOR.

52 George E. P/a fzer, Jr;

BY V f United States Patent 3,514,626 SWITCHING CIRCUIT George E. Platzer, Jr., Southfield, Mich., assignor of ten percent to Lon H. Romanski, Detroit, Mich. Filed Oct. 16, 1968, Ser. No. 767,942 Int. Cl. H02j 13/00 U.S. Cl. 307--114 11 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In a great majority of the homes presently being built,

it is accepted practice to eliminate ceiling-mounted elec-' tric lamps. In such instances a plurality of wall-mounted dual electrical outlets are provided about the room, as in a bedroom, and a wall-mounted switch is situated near the door leading to the bedroom. In this arrangement, the said wall switch is electrically connected so as to control one of the electrical outlets in each of said dual outlets.

As a consequence of the above arrangement, it is possible to plug a lamp into the switch-controlled outlet so that the lamp can be turned off and on by the said wall switch. However, a major disadvantage does exist in the above arrangement. That is, more often than not, the wall-switch controlled lamp, especially when located in a bedroom, is located at a point distantly remote from the said wall switch but conveniently close to the bed. As a consequence, upon entering the bedroom at night the wall switch is employed to turn on the remotely situated lamp. However, upon retiring for the night, the lamp, which is conveniently located near the bed, is turned off by means of a switch carried by the lamp itself.

Upon arising the next day, the lamp is permitted to remain in its off condition because of the natural sunlight. Consequently, upon re-entering the bedroom on the following night it becomes impossible to turn on the remotely situated lamp by means of the wall mounted switch because the circuit leading to the lamp has been left open at the lamp switch the previous night. This then requires the person to grope through the dark until the lamp switch is found and closed.

In view of the above, it is apparent that a conventional wall mounted room switch is almost totally ineffective for its intended purpose.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention comprises an electrical switching arrangement for use in combination with a source of electrical potential having at least first and second output terminals, a first output supply conductor electrically connecting said first terminal to a first switchmeans situated in a first of two switch stations, a second output supply conductor electrically connected to said second terminal; and a remotely located electrical load having at least first and second load conductors electrically connected to said electrical load; said switching arrangement comprising circuit means including second bistable switch means having two stable operating states, said second bistable switch p CC first of said load conductors and one of said output supply conductors, a second circuit conductor for electrically connecting a second of said output supply conductors to one side of said second bistable switching means, a third circuit conductor for electrically connecting a second of said load conductors to an other side of said second bistable switch means, said second bistable switch means being normally conductive when in a first of said two stable states, said first switch means being effective when closed and when said second bistable switch means is in said first stable state to energize said electrical load, and control means effective for at times placing said second bistable switch means in a second of said two stable states wherein said second bistable switch means is rendered non-conductive thereby deenergizing said electrical load even when said first switch means is closed.

Accordingly, a general object of this invention is to provide electrical circuitry which will enable the energization and de-energization of a remotely situated electrical load from a point which is remote from said electrical load as well as from a switch device carried by said load or in close proximity thereto.

Another object of this invention is to provide apparatus defining electrical circuitry which will enable conversion of the electrical circuitry as presently provided in homes, as described above, so as to enable switching operations in accordance with the above general object of this invention.

Other more specific objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent when reference is made to the following description considered in conjunction with the drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a schematic wiring diagram of one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is an elevational perspective view of a housing suitable for containing circuitry comprising the invention;

FIGS. 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 9 are each schematic wiring diagrams of other embodiments of the invention; and

FIG. 7 is an elevational perspective view of another housing assembl suitable for containing circuitry comprising the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now in greater detail to the drawings, FIG. 1 illustrates the invention as employed in a home having conventional A.C. circuitry therein. A source of AC. electrical potential 10 is illustrated as having output terminals 12 and 14 to which are connected electrical conductors 16 and 18, respectively. Conductor 18, as illustrated at 20, may also be connected to ground potential.

A wall mounted switch assembly 22 has conductor 16 electrically connected thereto, as to switch member 24, while the terminal or switch contact 26 is connected as by a conductor 28 to a first plug or contact member 30 carried by the room wall 32. A second electrical contact 34, also situated in the wall 32, is connected to conductor 18 as by a conductor 36. Switch member 24, when closed as illustrated at 24a, serves to complete the circuit from terminal 12 to wall contact 30.

A lamp assembly 38, illustrated generally by the phantom line 40, is comprised of a light bulb (electrical load) 42 and a conventional manually positioned electrical switch 44. The light bulb 42 has its terminals 46 and 48 electrically connected to conductors 50 and 52, respectively. Switch 44 is serially situated within conductor 50 and is effective for making and breaking the circuit at the load 42 if such is desired. Conductors 50 and 52 may comprise an electrical lamp cord and are respectively connected to male type electrical contacts 54 and 56'.

An adapter 58 is illustrated as comprising male type electrical terminals, 60 and 62, for electrical connection to the receptacle terminals and 34, and female electrical terminals 64, 66 for electrical connection to male plug terminals 54, 56.

A butterfly type of auxiliary switch member 68 pivotally supported as at 70, for oscillatory motion thereabout, is provided with push-button members 72 and 74. A tension spring schematically illustrated at 76 as being operatively connected to push-button 72, functions to normally maintain auxiliary switch member 68 closed against a contact or switch terminal 78 which, in turn, is electrically connected to adapter terminal 64 by means of a conductor 80.

A conductor 82 serves to electrically connect adapter terminal to support and contact so as to complete a circuit from terminal 60, through contact 70, auxiliary switch member 68 and contact 78. A second conductor 84 electrically connects adapter contacts 62 and 66 to each other.

An electromagnet 86, having a core 88 situated in close proximity to end 90 of switch member 68, has a coil winding 92 which, in turn, has its terminal ends connected to conductors 94 and 96 respectively electrically connected to conductors 82 and 84.

OPERATION OF EMBODIMENT OF FIG. 1

The operation of the invention as disclosed in FIG. 1 is as follows.

Condition 1 When wall switch 24 is closed (moved to position 24a), with the remaining elements in the positions shown, a circuit is completed through conductors 28, 82, contact 70, auxiliary switch member 68, contact 78, conductors 80, 50, lamp switch 44, lamp or load 42, conductors 52, 84, 36 and 18 and back to source 10, thereby energizing the lamp 42.

At the same time a circuit is completed through conductor 94, coil 92 and conductor 96 thereby energizing the electromagnet 86. The electromagnet 86 thereby energized attracts end 90 of switch member 68 so as to tend to rotate switch member 68 generally counter-clockwise about the pivot point contact 70. However, with switch member 68 in the position shown, the force of spring 76 is greater than the magnetic force of electromagnet 86 thereby maintaining switch 68 in the position shown.

Condition 2 Auxiliary switch member 68 may, of course, be remotely situated with respect terminal contacts 60 and 62 so as to be physically located, if desired, in close proximity to the load 46. Switch member 68 is merely illustrated within the phantom line confines merely to convey that it does form a portion of the overall adapter 58.

Accordingly, if switch 24 is closed according to above Condition 1, and it is desired to de-energize load 42 at a location remotely situated with respect to switch 24, such de-energization may be accomplished by depressing pushbutton 72 of auxiliary switch 68. This causes the armature end 90 of switch member 68 to be brought into close proximity with the core 88 of electromagnet 86; in this position the magnetic force is greater than the force of spring 76 and accordingly the armature 90 of auxiliary switch member 68 remains in such position. Consequently, the circuit through conductors 82, is opened, by virtue of switch member 68 moving away from contact 78, and the load (lamp) 42 is de-energized.

Condition 3 If it is now assumed that the circuitry of FIG. 1 is at described Condition 2 and it is desired to again energize the lamp 42 at the location of the auxiliary switch 68, all that is required is to move push-button 74 downwardly causing armature portion to move away from magnet core 88 and switch member 68 to move into engagement with contact 78 thereby completing the circuit therethrough and energizing lamp 42. This would effectively return the circuitry to that as described with reference to Condition 1.

Condition 4 Let it now again be assumed that the circuitry of FIG. 1 is at described Condition 2 and it is desired to again energize the lamp 42 at the wall-mounted switch 24. It can be seen that if wall switch 24 is first moved from closed position 24a to its open position, the circuit through conductors 82, 94 and 96 is opened thereby de-energizing the electromagnet 86. As a consequence of such de-energization of electromagnet 86 spring 76 causes auxiliary switch member 68 to rotate clockwise engaging contact 78. This now causes the circuitry to be reset to the condition as shown in FIG. 1. Once the circuitry is thereby reset all that needs to be done to energize the load 42 is to again close the circuit through wall switch member 24 by moving it to its closed position 24a against contact 26. When this is done the load 42 will be energized in accordance with the description of Condition 1.

EMBODIMENT OF FIG. 2

FIG. 2 illustrates a possible embodiment of the adapter 58, disclosed in FIG. 1, as comprising a suitable housing 90 carrying an exposed electrical receptacle 100 containing therein female type electrical terminals 64 and 66. Conductors 82 and 84, comprising an electrical cord 1102, are respectively connected at one end to blade type male terminals 60 and 62 of a plug assembly 104 and are respectively connected at their other ends to a tab 106 formed on an electrically conductive pivotal support stand 108 supporting the auxiliary switch member 68. A flexible electrical conductor 110 may be joined at its opposite ends to stand 108 and switch member 68. Electrical conductor 94 is shown connected to tab #106 as well as one terminal tab 112 of the electromagnet assembly 86.

Conductor 80* is connected at one end via a tab 114 to female'terrninal 64 and connected at its other end to a conductive support 116 for contact 78. Conductor 96 is, as depicted in FIG. 1, connected at one end to female terminal 66 (as by means of a tab not shown but similar to tab 114) and connected at its other end to the coil of electromagnet 86 (as by means of a tab not shown but similar to tab 106). Even though not specifically shown in FIG. 2, for purposes of clarity, it is apparent in view of FIG. 1 that suitable resilient means conforming to the function of spring 76 of FIG. 1 would be provided within the assembly of FIG. 2 in order to normally maintain auxiliary switch member 68 in closed circuit with contact 7 8.

In view of the above, it becomes readily apparent that the plug 104 may be connected to the wall terminals 30, 34 while the adapter assembly 58 can be situated in a position distantly remote from the wall switch 24, and

that the electrical load 42 can be connected, as by plug terminals 54, 56 to the female terminals 64 and 66 provided by the adapter assembly 58.

EMBODIMENT OF FIG. 3

FIG. 3 illustrates a modification of the invention shown in FIG. 1; all elements which are like those of FIG. 1 are identified with like reference numbers. Only fragmentary portions of the electrical supply system as well as the load circuitry (depicted at 28, 36, 50 and 52) are illustrated since those circuit systems may be considered identical to that of FIG. 1.

In comparing the embodiments of FIGS. 1 and 3, it can be seen that in FIG. 3, a conductor 120 is provided so as to connect one end of electromagnet coil 92 to conductor 80 instead of, as in FIG. 1, providing a conductor 96 to connect the same coil terminal to conductor 84.

The mode of operation of the embodiment of FIG. 3 is like that of FIG. 1 with respect to all of the described Conditions. However, it should be noted that in the embodiment of FIG. 3 the electromagnet 86 is energized only when auxiliary switch member 68 and auxiliary switch contact 78 are open and the Wall switch 24 is in its closed position at 2411.

If the switch 24 is closed and switch member 68 is opened, a small current will flow through the load or lamp 42 when the load 42 is ostensibly in its oil or de-energized condition; however, the lamp or load 42 will not be energized because of the small current flow. This is because, generally, the impedance of the electromagnet coil 92 will be large compared to the impedance of the load 42. Therefore, the resulting current flow will be of no material consequence in the load circuit comprised of conductors 52, 50.

EMBODIMENT OF FIG. 4

FIG. 4 illustrates another embodiment of the invention wherein an indicator lamp 122 has its terminals 124 and 126 respectively connected, as by conductors 128 and 130, to conductors 82 and 80. In FIG. 4, all elements which are like those of either FIG. 1 or FIG. 3 are identified with like reference numbers and, as in FIG. 3, only fragmentary portions of the electrical supply system as Well as the load circuitry (depicted at 28, 36, 50 and 52) are illustrated since that circuitry may be considered identical to that of FIG. 1.

The operation of the circuitry of FIG. 4 is like that of FIG. 3 with the further advantage that the lamp 122 serves as a night light. The lamp 122 may, of course, be situated where desired and may, accordingly, be fitted within the housing 98 of the adapter assembly as shown in FIG. 2. It will, of course, become apparent to the user of the invention provided with such a lamp 122 that whenever the lamp 122 is energized the wall switch 24 is, of necessity, closed.

The provision of such a night light as lamp 122 is not limited to the circuitry of FIG. 3 as specifically shown. For example, a lamp 122 may be added to the circuitry of FIG. 1 in the same manner as shown in FIG. 3 (by having lamp conductors 128 and 130 respectively connected to circuit conductors 82 and 80) or, if desired, lamp 122 may be connected in the circuits of either FIG. 1 or FIG. 3 by having the lamp conductors 128 and 130 respectively connected to circuit conductors 82 and 84.

EMBODIMENT OF FIG. 5

FIG. 5 illustrates another embodiment of the invention; all elements thereof which are like those of FIG. 1 or FIG. 3 are identified with like reference numbers. As in FIGS. 3 and 4, only fragmentary portions (depicted at 28, 30, 36, 34, 50, 54, 52 and 56) of the electrical supply circuitry as well as the load circuitry are shown.

In the embodiment of FIG. 5, conductor 82 is connected as between the male terminal contact '60 and an auxiliary switch member 6811 which is normally held closed against cooperating contact 78 as by tension spring 76. While one terminal of coil 92 is connected via conductor 94 to conductor 82 (as in FIGS. 1 through 4) the other terminal 132 of coil 92 is connected toa conductor 134 which terminates at its other end at a contact 136. Terminal 132 is also connected to one end of a resistor 138 which'has its other end connected to a conductor.

140 terminating at its other end at a contact 142. An additional conductor 144, having its terminal ends respectively provided with contacts 146 and 148 is connected via conductor 150 to conductor 84.

Momentary switch members 152 and 154 are provided in order to, at times, complete the circuit through contacts 142, 146 and contacts 136, 148, respectively.

Even though switch members 152 and 154 form a part of the overall adapted assembly 58b they, and the related contacts, may actually be housed separately within a suitable switch housing so as to form a switching assembly :1'56 remotely situated with respect to the remainder of the adapter assembly.

As has been previously stated, switch members 152 and 154 are momentary switches in that their respective normal positions are as illustrated and when individually actuated, switch member 152 will move to an open position and switch member 154 will move to a closed position. However, when either of such switches is released, such released switch will return to the position illustrated in FIG. 5. In many commercial switches of this type, resilient means such as springs are provided for causing the switch member to return to the normal position upon being released. However, in the interest of clarity such springs are not shown in the drawings.

OPERATION OF EMBODIMENT OF FIG. 5

The operation of the invention as disclosed in FIG. 5 is as follows.

Condition 1 When wall switch 24 is closed, as shown at 24a, and the other elements of the circuitry in the positions shown, a circuit is completed through conductor 82, switch mem ber 68a, conductor 80, load conductor 50, load 42, load conductor 52, adapter assembly conductor 84, supply conductor 36 and back to the source 10. At this time, current also flows from conductor 82 through conductor 94, relay coil 92, resistor 138, conductor 140, contact 142, normally closed switch member 152, contact 146, conductors 144 and .150 and back to adapter assembly conductor 84. However, the current flow through coil 92 is, at this time, insufficient to actuate or pull the armature or switch member 68a from its closed position. Accordingly, the circuit leading to the load conductors 50, 52 remains closed and the load 42 remains energized.

Condition 2 If the circuitry of FIG. 5 is assumed to be in a state described in above Condition 1, and push-button or momentary switch member 154 is pushed down so as to close the circuit across related contacts 136, 148, resistor 138 will become shorted by the branch circuit defined by conductor 134, contact 136, switch member 154, contact 148, conductor 144, and conductor 150. This causes the current flow through coil 92 to increase sufficiently to actuate armature or switch member 68a causing switch member 68a to move downwardly and opening the circuit through cooperating contact 78. Accordingly, it can be seen that as a consequence of switch member 68a becoming opened, the circuit defined adapter by conductors 82 and becomes opened thereby de-energizing the load conductors 50, 52 and electrical load 42.

When remote or auxiliary switch member 154 is released, it returns to its normal position, illustrated, thereby opening the circuit through conductor 134 and again reducing the current flow through the coil 92 because the resistor 138 is again placed in series with the coil 92. However, at this time, the current is sufficient to hold switch member 68a in its open position because it takes less magnetic force (current) to hold the switch member 68a open than it does to pull the switch member 68a from its closed position to an open position.

Therefore, with the elements of the circuitry of FIG. 5 remaining in the positions described herein in Condition 2, the load 42 will remain in a de-energized state.

Condition 3 If the circuitry of FIG. 5 is assumed to be in a state described in preceding Condition 2, and push button or momentary switch 152 is depressed so as to open the circuit through cooperating contacts 142, 146 the circuit through coil 92, resistor 138, conductor and conductor 150 is opened thereby stopping current flow through the coil 92. Consequently, spring 76 causes switch member 68a to move upwardly closing against cooperating 7 contact 78. Since wall switch 24 is in its closed position, the circuit through adapter conductors 82, 80 and 84 is completed as well as load conductors 50, 52 and electrical load 42.

Once the switch member 152 has been depressed and subsequently released, switch 152 will return to its normally closed position; however, as previously discussed, the current flow which is again re-established through coil 92 and resistor 138 is insufficient to actuate or switch member 68a.

Therefore, with the elements of the circuitry of FIG. remaining in the positions described herein in Condition 3, the load 42 will remain in an energized state.

Condition 4 If the circuitry of FIG. 5 is again assumed to be in a state described in preceding Condition 2 (load 42 having been tie-energized by virtue of remote auxiliary switch 154 being closed across contacts 146, 136 and switch member 6811 therefore being in an open state) it can be seen that the load 42 can be again energized by sequentially first opening wall switch 24 and then closing the same wall switch 24.

For example, if switch 24 is opened the current flow through coil 92 will terminate thereby permitting spring 76 to move switch member 6841 upwardly into engagement with cooperating contact 78. If the switch 24 is then closed, the circuit through adapter conductors 82, 80 (including switch member 68a), and 84 as 'well as load conductors 50, 52 and load 42 will be completed causing the electrical load 42 to be energized.

It is, of course, apparent that the load 42 will continue to be in an energized state as long as the elements of the circuitry remain in the positions described.

EMBODIMENT OF FIG. 6

FIG. 6 illustrates another embodiment of the invention; all elements which are like those in FIGS. 1 through 5 are identified with like reference numbers. As in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5, only fragmentary portions of the electrical supply circuitry and the load circuitry (depicted generally at 28, 30, 36, 34, 50, 54, 52 and 56) are shown.

In the embodiment of FIG. 6 the adapter assembly 58c is comprised of a conductor 160 which electrically connects male terminal contact 60 to female terminal contact 64. A second main conductor 162 is connected at one end to male terminal member 62 and, at its other end, connected to a terminal 164 of a triac 166 having second and third terminals 168 and 170, respectively. Basically, a triac consists of an N-P-N-P switch in parallel with a P-N-P-N switch formed in a single silicon crystal. Its action, generally, might be said to be similar to two parallel and oppositely poled silicon controlled rectifiers. The second terminal 168 of triac 166 is connected, as by a conductor 172 to female terminal contact 66.

A plurality of resistors 174, 176, 178 and 180 along with a diode 182 are serially arranged with respect to each other and applied across conductors 160, 162. A capacitor 184 has one side connected, as by a conductor 186, to a point electrically between resistors 178 and 180 while the other side of the capacitor 184 is connected, as by a conductor 188, to conductor 162.

Another branch conductor 190, connected at one end to a point between resistors 176 and 178, is connected at its other end to one end of a series resistor 192. The other end of resistor 192 is connected to a conductor 194 which terminates in a switch contact 196. A conductor 198, connected at one end to main conductor 1'62, terminates in a second switch contact 200. A momentary normally closed push button type switch member 202 serves to engage and complete the circuit through contacts 196 and 200.

A silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) 204 has its anode terminal connected to conductor 190 while the cathode terminal is connected, as by a conductor 206, to a switch con-tact 208. Another conductor 210, connected to conductor 162, terminates in another switch contact 212. A second momentary, normally closed, push button type switch member 214 serves to engage and complete the circuit through contacts 208, 212. The gate electrode 216 of SCR 204 is connected, as by a conductor 218, to conductor 194 at a point electrically between resistor 192 and contact 196.

Further, as shown, the third or gate terminal of triac 166 is connected, as by a conductor 220, to a point electrically between resistors 174 and 176.

Before progressing to the discussion of the operation of the embodiment of FIG. 6, it should be mentioned that, generally, the triac 166 serves as a switching member and thereby performs the function of, for example, contact 78 and switch member 68a of FIG. 5. The remainder of the components are employed to control the gate circuit of the triac 166.

Further, diode 182 and resistors 180, 178, 176 and 174 comprise a voltage divider network as well as a source of direct current while capacitor 184 serves to smooth the pulsating current through resistors 178, 176 and 174.

OPERATION OF THE EMBODIMENT OF FIG. 6

The operation of the invention as disclosed in FIG. 6 is as follows.

Condition 1 Assuming now that the various elements of FIG. 6 are in the respective positions shown and wall switch 24 being moved to a closed position as at 24a, it can be seen that a circuit is completed through conductor 160, load conductor 50, load 42, load conductor 52, and adapter conductor 172 to terminal 168 of triac 166. Like- Wise the circuit through supply conductor 36, adapter assembly conductor 162 to terminal 164 of triac is completed. Accordingly, it can be seen that instantaneously a voltage is applied across terminals 164 and 168 of triac 166.

In order to achieve conduction through the triac 166, there must be a voltage applied across terminals 164 and 168 and voltage must be applied at the control or gate electrode 170. It can be seen from the preceding that the first requirement for conduction is satisfied by the voltage applied to terminals 168 and 164 of triac 166 by conductors 172, and 162, respectively. The second requirement is satisfied by conductor 220 transmitting the needed voltage from the voltage divider network comprised of resistors 180, 178, 176 and 174 to the gate electrode or terminal 170.

Accordingly, it can be seen that with the various elements in the respective positions shown and with wall switch 24 being closed, the triac 166 is placed in a conductive state thereby resulting in the energization of load 42; the load 42 will continue to be energized as long as the switch 24 remains closed, as described above, and the other elements remain in the positions shown.

Condition 2 If it is now assumed that the circuitry of FIG. 6 is at described Condition 1 and it is desired to de-energize the lamp or load 42 at the location of switch members 202 and 214, all that is necessary is to reduce the current through the gate electrode 170 circuit of triac 166 to a value below the triggering value of the triac 166. This, basically, is the function of the SCR 204.

With momentary, normally closed, push button switches 202 and 214 being in their closed position, it can be seen that the gate to cathode circuit of SCR 204 is in a generally shorted condition by virtue of gate electrode 216 being electrically connected to conductor 218, conductor 194, contacts 196, 200, switch member 202, conductor 198, conductor 162, cord conductors 198, 162,

9 210, contacts 212, 208, switch member 214 and conductor 206 connected to the cathode of SCR 204.

In order to make an SCR conductive, forwardly, it is necessary to apply a voltage across the anode to cathode terminals of the SCR (making the anode positive, with respect to the cathode) and at the same time apply a voltage (or current fiow) to the gate to cathode circuit by making the gate positive, with respect to the cathode. Therefore, it can be seen that as long as the gate-to-cathode circuit of the SCR is shorted, the SCR will remain non-conductive.

When momentary push button switch 202 is moved to open the circuit through contacts 196 and 202 current flows through resistor 1-92, conductor 218 to the gate terminal 216 making the gate positive with respect to cathode causing the SCR to thereby become conductive. Another characterstic of an SGR is that once it is conductive the SCR remains conductive until such time as the anode to cathode current is interrupted. Accordingly, when momentary switch is released and it returns to its normally closed position across contacts 196, 198, the SCR continues to be conductive.

When the SCR is thusly made conductive, resistors 176 and 174 are effectively shunted so that most of the current flowing through resistor 178 flows through the SCR 204. Consequently, the current flow through conductor 220 and gate 170 becomes insufiicient to maintain the triac 166 in a conductive state. Accordingly, triac 166 becomes non-conductive thereby opening the circuit between conductors 162, 172 thereby de-energizing the load or lamp 42.

Condition 3 Assuming now that the circuitry of FIG. 6 is as described in above Condition 2 with the load 42 de-energized, and it is desired to again energize the load from a position whereat the switch members 202 and 214 are located, all that has to be done is to depress or move momentary switch 214 away from contacts 208, 212 thereby opening the circuit therethrough. Consequently, the current flow through the anode cathode circuit of SCR 204 is interrupted thereby causing the SCR to become non-conductive. Releasing the momentary switch member 214 and permitting it to return to its normally closed position will not cause the SCR to again become conductive because, as previously described, a short circuit is thereby again re-established between the SCR gate 216 and cathode.

SCR 204 being non-conductive re-establishes a sufficient current flow through conductor 220 to triac gate 170 causing the triac 166 to go into conduction thereby completing the circuit through conductors 162 and 172 and energizing the electrical load 42.

Condition 4 Assuming now that the circuitry of FIG. 6 is again as described in preceding Condition 2 with the load 42 deenergized, and it is desired to again energize the load from the location of the wall mounted switch 24, all that is required is to first move wall switch 24 to its open position and then move the wall switch 24 to itsclosed position as at 24a.

When the switch 24 is first moved to an open position, the current fiow through the SCR 204 is interrupted causing the SCR to become non-conductive. Accordingly, when switch 24 is subsequently closed, the SCR, being in a non-conductive state, causes the current to flow through conductor 220 to gate 17 thereby rendering the triac 166 conductive. This, in turn, as previously discussed, completes the circuit through conductors 1-62, 172 energizing the load 42.

EMBODIMENT OF FIG. 7

FIG. 7 illustrates, generally pictorially, a particular manner in which the various elements of, for example,

the circuitry of either FIG. 5 or 6 could be arranged. That is, it is contemplated that a suitable housing 222, containing the various elements of the respective circuit, carries a suitable terminal block 224, having female terminal contacts 64, 66, and male terminal contacts 60, 62. A separate switch housing 226 containing push buttons 228 and 230 (which may actually be members 152 and 154 of FIG. 5 or switch members 202 and 214 of FIG. 6) may be remotely situated with respect to housing 222 by virtue of an interconnecting extension type cord assembly 232 containing electrical conductors 234, 236 and 238 (which may be conductors 140, and 134 of FIG. 5 or conductors 194, 206 and a portion of 162 of FIG. 6).

If desired, housing 222 could be plugged into the outlet for the supply circuitry and the load circuitry plugged into contacts 64, 66 while the switch housing 226 remotely situated with respect to either or both the wall outlet and the load 42.

EMBODIMENT OF FIG. 8

FIG. 8 illustrates another embodiment of the invention which is basically a modification of the invention as disclosed in FIG. 6. All elements which are like those of FIG. 6 are identified with like reference numbers. As in the case of the preceding embodiments, only fragmentary portions of the supply circuitry and load circuitry are illustrated.

In addition to those elements which are common to the embodiment of FIG. 6, a conductor 240 connected at one end to a point electrically between resistors 178 and 176 terminates at its other end in a switch contact 242. A second conductor 244, having a switch contact 246 at one terminal end thereof, is serially connected to a resistor 248 and a diode 250 which has its cathode connected to conductor 172.

Resistors 252 and 254 connected at their respective one ends to conductors 244 and 162 are connected, as at a common terminal 256, by a conductor 258 to the gate 216 of SCR 204. The anode of SCR 204 is connected to conductor 240 while the cathode is connected to conductor 162. A capacitor 260 has one side thereof connected to conductor 162 and the other side thereof connected to conductor 244 at a point between resistor 248 and contact 246. A momentary, normally open, push button type switch member 262 is adapted to at times complete the circuit through contacts 242, 246.

OPERATION OF THE EMBODIMENT OF FIG. 8

The operation of the embodiment disclosed in FIG. 8 is as follows.

Condition 1 With the elements of FIG. 8 in the respective positions shown, the load 42 is, of course, de-energized. However, when Wall switch 24 is closed, triac 166 is driven into conduction in the same manner and for the same reasons as explained in the discussion of Condition 1 of the operation of the FIG. 6 embodiment. Accordingly, the load 42 is energized. At this time, a very small voltage drop appears across terminals 164, 168 of triac 166; therefore, diode 250 does not become conductive and capacitor 260 does not become charged. With the elements remaining in the conditions described electrical load 42 will continue to be energized.

Condition 2 With the circuitry in the above described Condition 1, it is possible to de-energize the load 42 by actuation of the remotely situated auxiliary switch member 262.

For example, if switch member 262 is tapped to close the circuit across contacts 242, 246, a circuit is completed from conductor 240 and through conductor 244. This permits a current flow through resistor 252 and into gate electrode 216 of SCR 204 thereby causing SCR 204 to become conductive. As described with reference the occurrence of possible spurious signals in the system.

With the triac 166 being non-conductive, the full line voltage appears across terminals 164, 168 of triac 166 and diode 250 now becomes effective for charging capacitor 260. It can be seen, that when capacitor 260 is fully charged the upper plate becomes positive (-1-) with respect to the lower plate which becomes negative Condition 3 With the various elements in the conditions described in above Condition 2, it becomes possible to again energize the remote load 42 by again tapping the momentary switch member 262 closed across contacts 242, 246. As a consequence of the circuit through contacts 242, 246 being thusly completed, the charged capacitor 260 is discharged through the SCR 204 with the current flow from the capacitor 260 being in opposition to that current flow established through SCR 204 by the first tapping closed of switch 262 as described in above Condition 2. Accordingly, the current flow supplied by capacitor 260 is sufiicient to effectively reduce the anode to cathode current flow through SCR 204 to a value insufficient to maintain SCR 204 conductive.

Consequently, current flow is again established to gate terminal 170, of triac 166, through resistor 176 and conductor 220, thereby placing triac 166 in conduction. This, in turn, causes the circuit through conductors 162 and 172 to be completed resulting, of course, in the energization of load 42.

Condition 4 With the various elements in the conditions described in above Condition 2, it becomes possible to again energize the remote load 42 by, instead of tapping switch 262 closed, first opening wall switch 24 and then closing the same wall switch 24.

For example, when wall switch 24 is first opened, the current flow through SCR 204 is terminated causing the SCR 204 to become non-conductive. Accordingly, the subsequent re-closing of wall switch 24 will not cause SCR to become conductive (for reasons previously explained in detail). Therefore, triac 166 becomes conductive completing the circuit through conductors 162 and 172 and energizing the remote load 42.

EMBODIMENT OF FIG. 9

FIG. 9 fragmentarily illustrates a modification of the circuitry of FIG. 8. All elements shown which are like those of FIG. 8 are identified with like reference numbers.

In the embodiment of FIG. 9, conductor 240, instead of being connected at one end to a contact 242 as in FIG. 8, is connected to the emitter electrode 263 of a P-N-P transistor 264 which, in turn, has its collector electrode 266 connected to one end of conductor 244. In comparison to FIG. 8, it can be seen that transistor 264 may be considered as replacing momentary switch member 262 and cooperating contacts 242 and 246.

Further, a conductor 268 connected at one end to conductor 162, terminates at its other end in a switch contact 270. A capacitor 272, having one side connected to a second switch contact 274 as by a conductor 276, has its other side connected to conductor 278 as by an intermediate conductor 280. A resistor 282 has one end connected to conductor 278 and its opposite end connected to conductor 276 via conductor 284. The other end of conductor 278 is connected to the base electrode 286 of transistor 264. A push button type, normally open, switch member 288 is provided in order to at times complete the circuit through cooperating contacts 270, 274.

OPERATION OF THE EMBODIMENT OF FIG. 9

Before discussing the operation of the sub-circuits of FIG. 9, it should be mentioned that its general operation is the same as that described in each of the four Conditions set forth in relation to the embodiment of the FIG. 8 circuitry. To this extent, transistor 264 is the equivalent of switch member 262 of FIG. 8; that is, whenever transistor 264 is rendered conductive completing the circuit through conductors 240, 244, the resulting action is the same as when switch 262 completes the circuit across contacts 242, 246.

Accordingly, the operation of the overall circuitry containing the modification of FIG. 9 is the same as that already described with reference to FIG. 8.

In the circuitry of FIG. 8, it would be possible to cause oscillation of the load 42 if the switch member 262 were held closed against contacts 242, 246. Accordingly, the specific improvement contemplated by the circuitry of FIG. 9 is the provision of means, in this example such means being electronic, whereby the circuit through conductors 240, 244 will be closed for a predetermined maximum length of time regardless of how long the switch member 288 is held against contacts 274, 270.

Accordingly, the operation of the specific embodiment of FIG. 9 is generally as described by the following.

Whenever switch member 288 is closed against contacts 270, 274, capacitor 272 becomes charged through the base electrode 286 of transistor 264. Such current flow causes the emitter electrode 263 to become positive with respect to base electrode 286 thereby causing the transistor 264 to become conductive through its emittercollector circuit thereby completing the circuit through conductors 240, 244. The transistor 264 continues to be conductive for the charging time of capacitor 272, which may be in the order of 50.0 micro-seconds. When capacitor 272 becomes charged, current flow from the base electrode 286 terminates, the transistor ceases to be conductive thereby opening the circuit between conductors 240 and 244.

Resistor 282, in parallel with capacitor 272, is employed to permit the charged capacitor 272 to discharge when the push button switch 288 is returned to its normally open position. The resistor 282 is, of course, of a resist-ance value which will allow only a current flow, through the base electrode 286, which is insufficient to cause or maintain transistor 264 in conduction once the capacitor 272 is charged.

SUMMARY In view of the preceding it can be seen that each of the embodiments of the invention provides an adapter which can be plugged into a wall switch controlled electrical wall outlet enabling a lamp or other remotely situated electrical load, which is plugged into the adapter, to be energized or de-energized by either the wall-mounted electrical switch or the auxiliary switch. This, of course, enables the energization of the lamp or load 42, for example, by the wall-mounted switch member 24 even after the lamp 42 has been previously extinguished or deenergized by the auxiliary switch such as 262.

Although only a select number of embodiments of the invention have been disclosed and described, it is apparent that other embodiments and modifications of the invention are possible within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. An electrical switching arrangement for use in combination with a source of electrical potential having at least first and second output terminals, a first output supply conductor electrically connecting said first terminal to a first switch means situated in a first of two switch stations, a second output supply conductor electrically connected to said second terminal; and a remotely located electrical load having at least first and second load conductors electrically connected to said electrical load; said switching arrangement comprising circuit means including second bistable switch means having two stable operating states, said second bistable switch means being situated in a position remote to said first switch station and said first switch means for enabling the completion of selective circuits between certain of said output supply conductors and said load conductors, said circuit means comprising a first circuit conductor adapted for elfecting continuous electrical connection between a first of said load conductors and one of said output supply conductors, a second circuit conductor for electrically connecting a second of said output supply onductors to one side of said second bistable switching means, a third circuit conductor for electrically connecting a second of said load conductors to an other side of said second bistable switch means, said second bistable switch means being normally conductive when in a first of said two stable states,

said first switch means being effective when closed and when said second bistable switch means is in said first stable state to energize said electrical load, and control means efiective for at times placing said second bistable switch means in a second of said two stable states wherein said second bistable switch means is rendered non-conductive thereby de-energizing said electrical load even when said first switch means is closed.

2. A switching arrangement according to claim 1 wherein said second bistable switch means comprises a switch member normally resiliently biased toward a closed condition against a cooperating electrical contact.

3. A switching arrangement according to claim 1 wherein said second bistable switch means comprises a semiconductor thyristor device.

4. A switching arrangement according to claim 3 wherein said semiconductor thyristor device comprises a triac.

5. A switching arrangement according to claim 1 wherein said control means comprises a third bistable device having first and second stable states.

6. A switching arrangement according to claim 1 wherein said control means comprises a third bistable device having first and second stable states, wherein said second bistable switch means comprises a switch member normally resiliently biased toward a closed condition against a cooperating electrical contact whereby said switch member is in said first mentioned first stable state, said third bistable device when in its first stable state being incapable of opening said switch member from said cooperating electrical contact, said third bistable device when in its second stable state being effective for holding said switch member electrically open with respect to said cooperating contact.

7. A switching arrangement according to claim 6 wherein said third bistable device comprises an armature operatively connected to said switch member, resilient means normally resiliently biasing said switch member closed against said cooperating contact, a coil assembly in relatively close proximity to said armature for at times exercising a holding function on said armature when said switch member is opened with respect to said cooperating contact.

8. A switching arrangement according to claim 1 wherein said control means comprises a third bistable device having first and second stable states, wherein said second bistable switch means comprises a thyristor device, voltage generating means efi'ective for causing said thyristor to be in its first stable state and conductive whenever said first switch means is closed and said third bistable device is in its first stable state and non-conductive, said third bistable device when activated to its second stable state being conductive and effective to cause said thyristor to be activated to its second stable state of non-conduction thereby de-energizing said load even when said first switch means is closed.

'9. A switching arrangement according to claim 8 wherein said third bistable device comprises a silicon controlled rectifier, wherein said voltage generating means comprises a voltage divider network, said silicon controlled rectifier being in general parallel arrangement with the control electrode circuitry of said thyristor whereby a shunt path is created through said silicon controlled rectifier whenever said silicon controlled rectifier is in its second stable state.

10. A switching arrangement according to claim 9 including control circuit means associated with said silicon controlled rectifier, said control circuit means comprising control circuit conductors interconnecting the anode, cathode and gate terminals of said silicon controlled rectifier, and manually operable switch means within said control circuit means, said manual switch means being efiective to at times cause said gate terminal and said cathode terminal to be at substantially the same electrical potential thereby maintaining said silicon controlled rectifier in its first stable and non-conductive state.

11. A switching arrangement according to claim 7 including control circuit means for at times causing a greater current flow through said coil assembly, said control circuit means comprising a first control circuit conductor including a series resistor and normally closed first manual switch electrically connected to said coil assembly and said first circuit conductor, and a second control circuit conductor in parallel with said first control circuit conductor and including a normally open second manual switch electrically connected to said coil assembly and said first circuit conduction, said second manual switch when closed being effective to increase the current flow through said coil means thereby causing said coil assembly to cause said first switch member to open with respect to said cooperating electrical contact.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 985,943 3/1911 Sachs 307-114 2,324,844 7/ 1943 Hutt 3071 14 X 2,979,624 4/ 1961 Askerneese 307-1l4 X 3,334,250 8/1967 Gwin 307114 ROBERT K. SCHAEFER, Primary Examiner T. B. J OIKE, Assistant Examiner U .S. C]. X.R. 307-

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3860910 *Aug 13, 1973Jan 14, 1975David S HudsonElectrical switch system for a house or the like
US3865101 *May 1, 1974Feb 11, 1975Datascope CorpPortable and separable heart monitor and heart defibrillator apparatus
US4523132 *May 30, 1984Jun 11, 1985Dieter ChristiansenCentrally controlled lighting installation having a plurality of individually switched light points central switch elements and individual light switches therefor
US4591731 *Jul 11, 1983May 27, 1986Jose GarciaCircuit for controlling the stopping of equipment
US4591765 *Oct 31, 1983May 27, 1986Beck Gregory MLamp control
US4672234 *Oct 23, 1985Jun 9, 1987Airmaster Fan CompanySwitch system for overhead electric cords
US4879495 *Oct 6, 1986Nov 7, 1989Yujiro YamamotoIllumination control methods and means
US5036214 *May 31, 1990Jul 30, 1991Zerillo Michael ARemote control switch for controlling two electric supplies
US5270576 *Mar 6, 1992Dec 14, 1993Compulog CorporationElectrical connector network
Classifications
U.S. Classification307/114, 307/140
International ClassificationH01R29/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01R29/00
European ClassificationH01R29/00