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Publication numberUS3515041 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 2, 1970
Filing dateFeb 5, 1969
Priority dateFeb 5, 1969
Publication numberUS 3515041 A, US 3515041A, US-A-3515041, US3515041 A, US3515041A
InventorsMurtaugh John J
Original AssigneeRex Chainbelt Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Slurry seal distributing box
US 3515041 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 2, 1970 J. J. MURTAUGH 3,515,041

SLURRY SEAL DISTRIBUTING BOX Filed Feb. 5, 1969 United States Patent O 3,515,041 SLURRY SEAL DISTRIBUTING BOX John J. Murtaugh, Waukegan, Ill., assignor to Rex Chainbelt Inc., Milwaukee, Wis., a corporation of Wisconsin Filed Feb. 5, 1969, Ser. No. 796,856 Int. Cl. E01c 19/48 US. C]. 94-44 12 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A slurry seal distributing box particularly adaptable for use with slurries comprising a cationic asphalt emulsion. A rectangular box frame supports a generally semicircular intermediate retainer which, with the rear frame BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention 7 The present invention pertains to the art of sealing the deteriorated surfaces of paved roads with a slurry comprising an emulsified asphalt, fine-grained aggregate and,

optionally, portland cement. More particularly, the present invention is directed to a slurry seal distributing box which is towed by a supply vehicle and is adapted particularly to sealing a paved surface by depositing thereon a thin layer of slurry containing a cationic asphalt emulsion.

Description of the prior art It is known in the art to seal a paved surface by towing a slurry-filled distributing box over the surface and allowing a thin layer of slurry to be extruded from under a laterally extending, surface engaging squeegee mounted 'on the rear of the box. Prior art boxes have been of generally simple construction consisting of a rectangular main frame having a lateral dimension corresponding to the width of the strip of slurry to be deposited. The longitudinal side frame members are substantially shorter and have surface-engaging runners which support the box for sliding movement behind the towing vehicle which also generally serves as the slurry supply vehicle.

The lower edges of the box frame members are provided with resilient surface-engaging sealing members to maintain the slurry Within the box, the rear sealing member functioning as the squeegee under which the slurry is forced as the box is moved forwardly. Prior art boxes may additionally have an intermediate screed or retainer extending laterally across the center of the box between the longitudinal side frame members. The intermediate screed aids in controlling and equalizing the flow of slurry within the box from a central supply point at the front of the box uniformly across the width of the box to the rear squeegee.

3,515,041 Patented June 2, 1970 Prior art slurry boxes have served adequately for sealing surfaces with slurries containing an anionic or negatively charged asphalt emulsion. In recent years, however, anionic asphalt emulsions have been replaced in slurry seals by cationic or positively charged asphalt emulsions. This change has been made because cationic emulsions have been discovered to exhibit more desirable chemical properties in slurry seals. A cationic emulsion can be mixed with a much wider range of types of aggregates to form a slurry that will break or set very rapidly upon deposition on a surface to be sealed.

Although the rapid break of a cationic slurry is a very desirable property, it has been found that use of such slurries in distributing boxes of the prior art causes extensive and extremely undesirable build-ups of hardened slurry. The build-up tends to occur primarily in the corners of the box where the flow of the slurry is retarded and sluggish. Prior art slurry boxes having an intermediate screed have as many eight corners in which a cationic slurry will break and build up because of diminished flow. Not only is the hardened slurry difiicult to clean from the slurry box, but, particularly in the rear corners, a buildup of hardened slurry will interfere with the smooth operation of the rear squeegee and cause unevenness and streaking in the layer of slurry deposited.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The slurry distributing box disclosed herein provides an optimum means of spreading a slurry seal comprising a cationic asphalt emulsion. The invention resides in the novel configuration of the intermediate retainer which forms the forward and lateral walls of the slurry reservoir of the box.

The arcuate shape of the retainer provides a reservoir with a laterally diminishing cross section so that the slurry supplied to the box centrally thereof flows laterally in both directions with an increasing velocity. As a result, there is a more rapid and positive flow of slurry into the corners formed by the ends of the retainer and the rear cross member; and the turbulence created by the rapid flow precludes premature breaking or setting of the cationic slurry.

The arcuate configuration of the intermediate retainer eliminates the two forward corners of the slurry reservoir of conventional boxes, and the improved slurry flow characteristics obviate the need for an intermediate screed.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a side elevation view of a slurry mixing and supply vehicle with a slurry distributing box of the present invention operatively attached to the rear thereof.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the slurry distributing box of the present invention viewed generally from a forward corner thereof.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In FIG. 1, a slurry seal mixer 1 of a known type is mounted on the rear of a standard truck 2. The mixer 1 may include storage hoppers and tanks for the various slurry ingredients and means for providing continuous batching and supply of the slurry. The slurry seal mixture is received from the mixer and spread onto the surface to be sealed by a slurry distributing box 10 of the 3 type disclosed herein. The, nected to and towed behind the truck and attached mixer.

Referring to FIG. 2 the slurry distributing box has a generally rectangular main frame comprising a forward cross frame member 11, a rear cross frame member 12, and a pair of side frame members 13. The rearward ends of the side frame members 13 are demountably connected to the respective ends of the rear cross frame member 12 as with angle brackets 14 and threaded fasteners 15. The forward ends of the side frame members are similarly demountably connected to the ends of the forward cross frame member 11. The fastening means used to. interconnect the main frame members may vary, the primary consideration being to provide means for rapidly disassembling the members for cleaning the fastsetting cationic slurry.

The lower edges of the side frame members 13 are provided with runners 16 adapted to support the slurry box 10 for sliding movement behind a towing vehicle and over the surface to be treated. To provide towing connection to the towing and slurry supply vehicle, a pair of draw chain clips 17 are attached to the face of the forward cross frame member 11. Each clip 17 is adapted to receive the end of one of a pair of draw chains 17a which chains are attached by their opposite ends to the rear of the vehicle.

The rear cross frame member 12 is disposed with its lower edge 18 above the plane of the runners 16 or spaced from the surface to be treated. Attached to and extending downwardly from the lower edge 18 of rear cross frame member 12 is a rear squeegee 19. The squeegee 19 comprises a continuous strip of relatively thick rubber or other suitable flexible resilient material and is adapted to engage, along the entire length of its lower edge, the surface to be treated. The squeegee 19 is bent or flexed in the rearward direction by the forward movement of the slurry box 10. The slurry within the box is thereby extruded or squeezed under the squeegee 19 onto the surface in a thin layer.

Since the thickness of the layer of slurry deposited is dependent primarily upon the maximum size of the aggregate used in the slurry, the squeegee 19 is, preferably fixed so that its lower edge just engages the surface to be sealed. The thickness of the layer may, however, be varied slightly by a vertical adjustment, up or down, of the squeegee 19. Several means for providing this adjustment are known and used in the art. One means includes a jack-screw apparatus, such as at 34, adapted to raise or lower the rear cross frame member 12 relative to the runners 16, and another means includes a series of spring-biased adjusting screws by which the squeegee 19 is attached to the rear cross frame member. Either of these adjusting means may be used with a slurry box of the present invention, but neither of them are necessary, and they form no part of the invention.

The intermediate retainer 20 of the present invention is disposed within the rectangular main frame of the box and forms with the rear cross frame member 12 and attached squeegee 19 the slurry reservoir. The retainer 20 is formed of a heavy strip of rubber or other similar material as is the squeegee 19. The retainer preferably has a width approximately equal to the height of the slurry box 10 and a length sufficient to provide the preferred arcuate configuration in its operative position within the box 10, as will be described in. more detail below. The retainer 20 may be and, depending on whether the box is adapted for variable width adjustment, preferably is comprised of two overlapping sections of substantially equal lengths.

The intermediate retainer 20 is secured in position within the box 10 by a series of clamps such that the retainer is vertically disposed with its lower edge coplanar with the runners 16 and the lower edge of the squeegee 19; i.e., in contact with the surface to be treated. The ends of the retainer are secured to the rearward ends of distributing box 10 is conthe side frame members 13 by a pair of side frame clamps 21. The clamps 21 are demountably attached to the upper edges of the side frame members 13 and extend downwardly therefrom so that the ends of the retainer 20 are clamped against the inside faces 22 of the side frame members 13. From its ends the retainer 20 extends in an arcuate manner forwardly and inwardly within the rectangular main frame such that it is symmetrically disposed with respect to the longitudinal centerline of the frame. The midpoint of the retainer lies closely adjacent and in tangential relationto the forward cross frame member 11.

The retainer is secured to the forward cross frame member 11 by a pair of cross frame clamps 23 similar to the side frame clamps 21. The cross frame clamps 23 are demountably attached to a pair of triangular-shaped brackets 24 which are in turn secured to the forward cross frame member 11'on opposite sidesof its midpoint. The brackets 24 have downwardly depending vertical faces against which the retainer 20 is clamped by the cross frame clamps 23, said vertical faces being disposed to maintain the arcuate shape of the retainer.

A pair of intermediate braces 25 interconnect the forward and rear cross frame members 11 and 12, respectively, to provide added structural rigidity to the slurry box. Attached to and depending downwardly from each brace 25 is a back-up pad 26 disposed intermediate each pair of clamps 21 and 23. The back-up pads 26 provide additional support to the retainer 20 and aid in main- 'taining the arcuate shape thereof. The retainer 20 may,

optionally, be secured to the back-up pads with demountable clamps 26a. The vertical surfaces of the pads 26 may be curved to conform more closely to the curvature of the retainer, a shown. However, since continuous curvature of the retainer over its entire length is not essential, the vertically disposed surfaces of the pads 26 may be flat. Thus, the retainer, though having a generally arcuate shape in its mounted position, may have portions which are flattened. In addition to the portions of the retainer which may be flattened by their abutment against the backup pads 26, the portions by which the retainer is mounted with the clamps 21 and 23 may also be flat.

In operation, the pre-mixed slurry is poured or chuted directly into the reservoir formed by the intermediate retainer 20 and the rear cross frame member '12 and depending squeegee 19. The typical slurry seal mix comprises an emulsified asphalt and a fine-grained aggregate. A small percentage of portland cement may also beincluded.'The slurry is quite fluid in its mixed state and will remain so for a reasonable length of time if mixing or agitation of the mixed slurry is continued. As is particularly the case with a slurry containinga cationic asphalt emulsion, a rapid and irreversible break or set will occur on deposition of the slurry on the surface that is being treated. The arcuate shape of the intermediate retainer 20 provides a continuing mixing and agitation adapted to prevent breaking of the slurry within the reservoir.

The slurry is generally poured into the box centrally thereof and at a point just inside the forward cross frame member 11, as by means of a chute 36 extending rearwardlyffrom the back of the towing and supply vehicle. The flow of slurry into the reservoir is adjusted to correspond to the volume of slurry deposited on the surface with the forward movement of the box. In this manner the depth of slurry in the reservoir is maintained fairly constannAs the box is moved forwardly, the slurry flows generally radially toward-the rear cross frame member 12 and attached squeegee 19. As can be seen from the drawing, the shape of the retainer 20 conforms very nearly to the natural path of flow'of the slurry from the supply point to the rear corners.

The arcuate retainer 20 eliminates, as a portion of the slurry reservoir, the areas within the main frame adjacent and including the forward corners; i.e. the corners formed by the abutment of the forward cross frame member 11 and the side frame members 13. Since these areas are outside the natural direct flow path of the slurry, elimination of them'eliminates areas where, in prior art boxes, the flow of slurry is sluggish and the tendency of the slurry to break and build up is greatest.

The arcuate shape of the retainer 20 is also adapted to prevent an undesirable build-up of slurry in the rear corners of the box 10. The longitudinal cross section of the slurry reservoir is of a laterally diminishing area and, as a result, the velocity of flow of the slurry from the central supply point increases laterally in accordance with the principles of fluid flow. The flow velocity is a maximum at or near the rear corners and is of a magnitude, within the range of forward operating speed of the box, suflicient to create a turbulence in the slurry which prevents a premature break and consequent build-up, particularly in the corners.

To allow selective adjustment of the width of the box, the forward and rear cross frame members 11 and 12, respectively, are provided with telescoping extensions. Thus, the forward cross frame member 11 includes a pair of forward cross frame extensions 27 adapted to interfit telescopingly within the ends of the central section 28 of the member 11. The extensions 27 may be slidably positioned to the desired width and secured in position, as by bolts 29 extending through a series of matching holes in the interfitting portions of the central section 28 and the extensions 27. Similarly, the rear cross frame member 12 includes a pair of rear cross frame extensions 30 adapted to be slidably positioned within the ends of the intermediate section 31 of the member 12 and secured in position in a suitable manner, such as with bolts 32.

Because of the arcuate shape and flexibility of the intermediate retainer 20', the width of the box may be varied within limits and as previously described merely by additionally adjusting the back-up pads 26. Preferably, however, the box should be adjustable over a greater range of Widths than is possible with a single-piece retainer 20. Thus, the retainer comprises two substantially identical overlapping portions 33 of sufficient lengths so that the width of the retainer 20 may be adjusted to correspond to the selected width of the box without substantially changing the general arcuate shape of the retainer.

The improved slurry flow characteristics produced by the retainer 20 obviate the need for an intermediate screed. The elimination of an intermediate screed eliminates the forward portion of the two-part reservoir common in prior art boxes and, thus, four additional corners where slurry may prematurely set and build up.

To provide a more positive seal at the rear corners and to further facilitate cleaning, the box may be provided with corner seals 35. These seals 35 are made of relatively short pieces of a material similar to that comprising the intermediate retainer 20 and rear squeegee 19. The corner seals 35 are secured at one of their respective ends to the side frame members 13, along with the ends of the retainer 20, by clamps 21 such that the lower edges of the seals engage the surface upon which the box is resting. The seals are bent around the rear corners such that their opposite free ends lie against the ends of the rear cross frame member 12. The pressure of the slurry in the reservoir, along with the inherent resiliency of the seal material, maintains the free ends of the corner seals in position. Alternately, the corner seals 35 may comprise integral extensions of the ends of the retainer 20. In either case, the seals are readily removable with disassembly of the box to further facilitate simple and rapid cleaning.

Although the invention has been shown and described with reference to a particular embodiment, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes may be made therein, in form and detail, without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is: j

1. In an apparatus for applying a slurry seal mixture to a surface to be sealed including a prime mover operable in a given direction, a slurry receiving and distributing device comprising: a supporting frame, a flexible resilient retainer arcuately disposed within said frame and attached thereto by its ends and mid-portion such that said retainer is rearwardly Open respecting the direction of operation, said retainer having a lower edge in contact with the surface to be sealed, and sealing means including a'surface engaging squeegee operatively associated with said retainer to form a slurry retaining reservoir, said squeegee being deformable by the forward movement of said device whereby the slurry within said reservoir is extruded under said squeegee in a thin layer onto the surface to be sealed.

2. The invention of claim 1 wherein said supporting frame comprises a pair of longitudinally extending surface engaging side frame members and a forward cross, frame member demountably interconnecting the forward ends of said side frame members.

3. The invention of claim 2 wherein said sealing means further includes a rear cross frame member demountably connected by its ends to the rearward ends of said side frame members.

4. The invention of claim 2 wherein said retainer is demountably attached to said supporting frame.

5. The invention of claim 3 wherein said cross frame members and said retainer are laterally extensible whereby the width of said device may be selectively varied.

6. A slurry seal distributing box adapted to be moved over a surface to be sealed, comprising: a pair of longitudinally extending surface engaging side frame members, a forward cross frame member interconnecting the forward ends of said side frame members, a rear cross frame member interconnecting the rearward ends of said side frame members, a flexible resilient intermediate retainer arcuately disposed within said interconnected frame members and attached by its respective ends to the rearward ends of said side frame members and by a portion intermediate its ends to said forward cross frame member such that the lower edge of said retainer is substantially coplanar with the surface engaging edges of said side frame members, and a squeegee attached to and extending downwardly from the lower edge of said rear cross frame member such that the lower edge of said squeegee is substantially coplanar with the lower edge of said retainer and forms therewith a surface engaging static seal to retain the slurry therein, said squeegee being deformable by the forward movement of said box such that the slurry is extruded under said squeegee in a uniformly thin layer over its entire length.

7. The invention of claim 6 wherein said forward and rear cross frame members each comprise at least one pair of interfitting telescoping members laterally adjustable to selectively vary the width of said box and thereby vary the width of the layer of slurry deposited.

8. The invention of claim 6 wherein the ground engaging edges of said side frame members comprise a pair of runners adapted to support saidbox for sliding movement behind a towing vehicle.

9. The invention of claim 7 wherein said frame members are demountably interconnected and said retainer is demountably attached to said forward cross frame member and said side frame members.

10. The invention of claim 7 wherein said intermediate retainer comprises at least two overlapping portions whereby its length may be selectively varied to correspond to the selected width of said box.

11. The invention of claim 10 wherein said retainer is additionally supported intermediate its attachment to said forward cross frame member and its respective attachments to said side frame members by apair of adjustable baek-up pads, whereby the afeuafe -configuraticn of said 'i'etainer, may be inaintained regardless of the selected "width at which said box is operated.

' 1 2.-The-inventid 9f 'c1aim 9'inc1 1dinga pair of de- 5 mountable co -ner' seals of a flexible resilient material each attached by'one of its ends to the'l earward end of one of said side frame members and adapted to be bent around the'cq rner fo r nedby said side framemember-and said rear 'crossframe member and to 'rest against the inside 10 surface thereof.

References "citd' v I UNITED ATES PATENTS;

Sub; 94-46 .IANILE c. BYERS, ii- Primary Examiner

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2145158 *Sep 1, 1936Jan 24, 1939Karl DammannMethod of applying tar or bitumen to road surfaces
US2182217 *Nov 7, 1938Dec 5, 1939Wahlstrom Charles SSeal coating machine for highways
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4304504 *Feb 21, 1980Dec 8, 1981Riguez AssociatesUnsegregator shroud for hot mix asphalt laydown machine
US4477203 *Aug 16, 1982Oct 16, 1984Alexander LaditkaApparatus and method for applying coatings to traffic surfaces
US4492490 *Jun 25, 1982Jan 8, 1985Christine David RRoad repair spreader
US4571119 *Sep 29, 1983Feb 18, 1986Jones James FRoadway patching attachment for dump trucks
US4603999 *Sep 16, 1983Aug 5, 1986Alexander LaditkaApparatus for mixing and spreading coatings on surfaces
US4725163 *Apr 7, 1986Feb 16, 1988North Shore CompanyApparatus for applying liquid surface sealer
US4767234 *Nov 4, 1987Aug 30, 1988Rizzo Rudolph RHighway sealant applicator system
US5085537 *Sep 24, 1990Feb 4, 1992Alexander LaditkaMethods and apparatus for dispensing, mixing, and applying coating constituents to traffic surfaces
US5251998 *Feb 3, 1992Oct 12, 1993Alexander LaditkaMethods and apparatus for dispensing, mixing and applying coating constituents to traffic surfaces, and traffic surfaces coated using such methods
US5360287 *Oct 12, 1993Nov 1, 1994Alexander LaditkaMethods and apparatus for dispensing, mixing and applying coating constituents to traffic surfaces, and traffic surfaces coated using such methods
US5807022 *Aug 15, 1996Sep 15, 1998Mccleary Concepts And Creations, Inc.Combination mortar and grout spreading device
DE2448266A1 *Oct 10, 1974Apr 15, 1976Kemna Bau Andrea Gmbh & Co KgVariable-grade-compound road-surfacing machine - with skimmer element angled sideways for front to engage higher level
Classifications
U.S. Classification404/108
International ClassificationE01C19/16, E01C19/00
Cooperative ClassificationE01C19/16
European ClassificationE01C19/16
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 7, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: REXWORKS, INC., A CORP. OF DE.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:REXNORD INC.;REEL/FRAME:004000/0737
Effective date: 19820423