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Publication numberUS3515042 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 2, 1970
Filing dateOct 14, 1968
Priority dateOct 14, 1968
Publication numberUS 3515042 A, US 3515042A, US-A-3515042, US3515042 A, US3515042A
InventorsAustin Harold J
Original AssigneeAustin Harold J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Concrete vibrating and finishing machine
US 3515042 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 2, 1970 H. J. AUSTIN 3,515,042

CONCRETE VIBRATING AND FINISHING MACHINE Filed Oct. 14, 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 V4 INVENTOR.

HAROLD J1 AusT/N June 2, 1970 H. J. AUSTIN 3,515,042

CQNCRETE VIBRATING AND FINISHING MACHINE Filed 001;. 14, 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I N VE N TOR. Hnnow JI/h/sruv 1 ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,515,042 CONCRETE VIBRATING AND FINISHING MACHINE Harold J. Austin, 1360 Acacia Ave., San Bernardino, Calif. 92405 Filed Oct. 14, 1968, Ser. No. 767,103 Int. Cl. E01c 19/30 US. Cl. 94--48 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A lightweight portable machine for concurrently compacting freshly poured concrete and smoothing the surface thereof, which machine includes a vibrating plate pivotally supported between two elongate rollers in which openings are formed, and a handle extending rear-wardly from the plate for not only moving and guiding the device, but which permits the plate to be placed in a first concrete smoothing and compacting position when the machine is moved forwardly, and in a second position where the plate serves the same function when it is moved rearwardly.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention A machine for concurrently vibrating a body of fresh- Iy poured concrete and smoothing the surface thereof as it is moved forwardly and rearwardly thereover.

Description of the prior art Although numerous machines and like devices have been devised and used in the past to smooth or finish the surface of freshly poured concrete, as well as compact the concrete. Such equipment have been heavy and cumbersome, and not adapted for use on small areas of of concrete such as sidewalks, or the like. The present invention overcomes the disadvantages of such prior equipment by providing a portable, lightweight, manually operable machine that may be used to concurrently vibrate and compact freshly poured concrete, as well as smooth and finish the surface thereof.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A machine for concurrently vibrating and finishing the surface of freshly poured concrete, which device includes side pieces that serve to hold two hollow, perforated rollers in fixed longitudinally spaced relationship. A plate is pivotally supported from the side pieces between said rollers, from which plate a handle extends upwardly and rearwardly to aid in moving and guiding the device. The handle is also used to selectively move the plate into either first or second positions as the machine is moved forwardly and rearwardly over a body of concrete. Power means are operatively associated with the plate to vibrate the plate and the rollers.

The vibrating rollers serve to force aggregate downwardly into the concrete, as well as cause air contained in the concrete, together with any excess water, to rise to the surface. Excess water rising to the concrete surface serves as a lubricant to impart a smooth surface to the concrete as a portion of the plate when in the first position slidably engages said surface.

A major object of the present invention is to provide a portable, lightweight, inexpensive machine for concurrently compacting freshly poured concrete by dispelling entrained air and excess water therefrom, and smoothing the surface of the compacted concrete.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a first form of the machine;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the machine shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a transverse cross-sectional View of the device, taken on line 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a bottom plan view of the machine;

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view of the machine in a first position;

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of the machine in a second position;

FIG. 7 is a transverse cross-sectional view of the device, taken on line 77 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of an eccentrically loaded pulley for imparting vibrations to a plate when it is in sliding contact with the concrete; and

FIG. 9 is a side elevational view of a side elevational view of a prime mover that drives a second form of eccentrically loaded member to impart vibrations to the concrete.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The concrete vibrating and finishing machine I is shown in a first form in FIG. 1, and in a second or modified form I in FIG. 9. The form I of the invention includes first and second hollow rollers A and A in which spaced perforations or openings 10 are formed, for reasons that will be explained hereinafter. Rollers A and A are rotatably supported in transverse longitudinally spaced relationship by two parallel side pieces B.

A plate C is pivotally supported from the side pieces B, and is situated between rollers A and A. An engine D is rigidly supported in a fixed position relative to plate C, with the engine D in the first form I of the machine driving an eccentrically loaded pulley E, and in the second form of the invention, rotating an eccentrically loaded body E, as shown in FIG. 9.

An elongate handle F is rigidly secured to plate C, projecting upwardly and rearwardly therefrom. Handle F is not only used in moving aird guiding the machine, but permits plate C to be selectively disposed in a first position shown in FIG. 5 or a second position illustrated in FIG. 6. Stops G shown in FIG. 3 prevent movement of the plate C beyond the first and second positions.

When the machine is being moved forwardly, the plate C occupies the first position shown in FIG. 5. However, when the device is being moved rearwardly, the plate C occupies the position shown in FIG. 6.

In operation, when the machine is moved across the upper surface of freshly poured concrete I (FIGS. 5 and 6), the plate C is vibrated, as are the rollers A and A. The vibrating rollers A and A force aggregate downwardly into the concrete and cause entrained air bubbles and excess water to rise to the surface of the concrete. Obviously, the escape of such air and excess water tends to compact the concrete. The water which rises to the surface tends to provide a lubricant on the upper surface of the concrete J as the plate C slides thereover to impart a smooth finish to the concrete.

The rollers A and A are structurally identical, and accordingly, only one roller need be described herein as to structure. Roller A includes two circular rigid end pieces 12, in each of which a central opening 14 is formed. A cylinder 16 of a perforated sheet material such as expanded metal, or the like, is provided, that slips over the end pieces 12 and is secured thereto by conventional means.

Pairs of transversely aligned openings 18 are formed in the ends of side pieces D through which transverse shafts 20 extend. Each shaft 20 extends through aligned pairs of the openings 14 and '18 and rotatably supports one of the rollers A or A thereon. The ends of shafts are threaded (not shown) which extend outwardly from the side pieces B to be engaged by nuts 22.

Plate C, as may best be seen in FIG. 3, includes forwardly and rearwardly disposed, upwardly curved end portions 24 and 26, as well as side walls 27. The end portions 24 and 26 develop into arcuate guards 24a and 26a that are disposed above rollers A and A, and extend at least partially thereover.

A platform 28 extends between end portions 24 and 26, which platform is secured to said end portions by bolts 30, or other conventional means. Transversely aligned, upwardly extending portions 32 are provided on the sides of platform 28, and bores are formed therein through which bolts 34 extend. Bolts 34 also extend through transversely aligned bores (not shown) formed in side pieces B. The bolts 34 serve to pivotally support the platform 28 and plate C from the side pieces B.

Engine D is rigidly secured to a longitudinally extending bracket 35 that is afiixed by conventional means to the center upper surface of platform 28, as shown in FIG. 1. Two transversely aligned, upwardly extending arms 36 project from side pieces B that support a cross bar 38 therebetween. The cross bar 38 has two upwardly extending, transversely spaced brackets 40 mounted thereon, which also support a shaft 42 therebetween. Shaft 42 rotatably supports the eccentrically loaded member E in the manner illustrated in FIG. 1.

Member E comprises a pulley 44, and a Weight 46 is affixed thereon in an off-centered position. A driving pulley 49 on engine D, as may be seen in FIG. 2, is connected by an endless belt with pulley 44. Handle F (FIG. 1) extends upwardly and rearwardly from the first form of the machine I, and when pivoted, permits the plate C to be disposed either to the first position shown in FIG. 5 or the second position illustrated in FIG. 6. Handle F permits the first form I of the invention to be guided and moved forwardly and rearwardly over the surface of the body of cement I.

When the engine D is actuated, the eccentrically loaded member E is rotated and imparts vibration to the platform 28, which is transmitted from the platform to the side pieces B, the rollers A and A, and the plate C. Vibration of the rollers A and A results in forcing the aggregate contained in the concrete body I downwardly therein, and at the same time causes entrained air in the concrete to rise upwardly to escape therefrom. Also, due to vibration of the body of concrete J, any excess water contained therein is caused to pass upwardly to the upper surface thereof.

When the first form of the invention I is moved forwardly over a body of concrete J, the handle F is used to pivot plate C into the first position shown in FIG. 5 where the rear portion of the plate is in sliding contact with the upper surface of the body of concrete. Excess water that rises to the surface of the concrete body I serves as a lubricant to impart a smooth finish thereto as the concrete is slidably engaged by the plate C.

When the first form of the machine I is moved rearwardly, the handle F is used to pivot the plate C into the second position shown in FIG. 6 when the forward part of the plate is in sliding contact with the upper surface of the body of concrete I. The action of the first form of the invention I when moved rearwardly is the same as when moved forwardly.

Stop G shown in FIG. 3, includes a vertical, upwardly extending pin 50 afiixed to plat form 28. One of the side pieces B is provided with a horizontal, inwardly extending lug 52 in which a vertical bore 54 is formed. Pin 50 is vertically movable in bore 54. First and second longitudinally spaced washers 56 and 58 are secured to pin 50 and disposed on opposite sides of lug 52. When first washer 56 is in contact with lug 52, as shown in FIG. 3, the plate C is disposed in a first position. Likewise, when the second washer 58 contacts the lug 52, the plate C is disposed in a second position as illustrated in FIG. 7.

The second form I of the invention is the same as the first form I, except that the arms 36, cross bar 38, and the pulley assembly shown in FIG. 8 is eliminated therefrom. Also, in the second form I, the engine D is mounted directly on the platform 28 by conventional means, with the pulley being replaced by an off-centered, relatively heavy rotatable body 60, as shown in FIG. 9. R0- tation of body 60 results in vibration being imparted to plate C, and rollers A and A in the same manner as in the first form of the device.

Both the first and second forms I and I operate in the same manner and produce the same results. Guards 24a and 26a prevent particles of concrete from being thrown onto platform 28 and engine D during operation of the machine.

As this invention may be embodied in several forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof, the present embodiment is simply illustrative. Also, since the scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims, all changes falling within the metes and bounds of the claims, or that provide their functional as well as conjointly cooperative equivalents are therefore intended to be embraced by these claims.

I claim:

1. A machine for use in concurrently compacting a body of freshly poured concrete and finishing the upper surface thereof, including:

(a) two laterally spaced, parallel side pieces;

(b) first and second rollers extending transversely between the ends of said side pieces and rotatably supported therefrom, in which rollers a plurality of spaced openings are formed;

(0) a transverse plate disposed between said first and second rollers and pivotally supported from said side pieces in an elevated position above said upper surface, with said plate having transverse upwardly and rearwardly extending edge portions;

((1) power means for vibrating said plate; and

(e) an elongate upwardly and rearwardly extending handle rigidly secured to said plate for selectively moving said machine forwardly and rearwardly over said body of concrete, which handle is used to pivot said plate into a first position where a first portion thereof adjacent said rear edge contacts and vibrates said body of concrete as said machine moves forwardly thereover, and with said handle being used to pivot said plate into a second position where a second portion thereof adjacent said forward edge contacts and vibrates said body of concrete as said machine is moved rearwardly thereover, with said rollers forcing aggregate contained in said body of concrete downwardly therein as said machine rolls thereover, and with said plate both compacting said body of concrete and smoothing the upper surface thereof as said machine is moved forwardly and rearwardly thereover.

2. A machine as defined in claim 1 wherein said rollers are formed at least in part by a sheet material having a plurality of spaced openings formed therein.

3. A machine as defined in claim 1 wherein said rollers are formed at least in part by reticulated material.

4. A machine as defined in claim 1 wherein said power means includes:

(f) an internal combustion engine;

(g) first means for rigidly connecting said engine to said plate; and

(h) an eccentrically loaded rotatable member driven by said engine for imparting vibrations to said plate when said engine is operating.

5. A machine as defined in claim 4 wherein said eccentrically loaded rotatable member is directly connected to the drive shaft of said engine and transmits said vibrations to said plate through said engine and first means as said member is rotated.

6. A machine as defined in claim 1 wherein said power means includes:

(f) an internal combustion engine mounted on said plate and is situated thereabove, which engine ineludes a driving pulley; 5 (g) an eccentrieally loaded driven pulley; (h) an endless belt connecting said driving and driven pulleys; and (i) rigid means for rotatably supporting said driven pulley in a fixed position relative to said plate, with 10 said driven pulley when rotated vibrating said plate. 7. A machine as defined in claim 6 wherein said rigid means includes:

(j) two transversely aligned arms projecting upwardly from said side pieces; (k) a rigid cross bar rigidly secured to said arms; (1) two laterally spaced brackets secured to said cross bar; and (m) a. transverse shaft supported by said brackets and extending therebetween, which shaft rotatably sup- 30 ports said eccentrically loaded pulley. 8. A machine as defined in claim 1 which further in cludes:

(f) forwardly and rearwardly positioned guards that project upwardly from the forward and rear edges of said plate and project at least partially over said rollers to prevent particles of said concrete from being deposited on the upper surface of said plate by said rollers as said device is moved on said upper surface.

9. A machine as defined in claim 1 which further includes:

(i) stop means for limiting the pivotal movement of said plate relative to said side pieces to said first and second positions.

10. A machine as defined in claim 1 wherein said power means vibrates said plate, side pieces and said rollers.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,560,734 11/1925 Rook .94-48 2,025,703 12/1935 Baily 94-48 2,039,078 4/1936 Hertwig 94-48 2,094,910 10/1937 Baily 94-48 3,048,089 8/1962 Kaltenegger 94-48 XR 3,342,118 9/1967 Beierlein 94-48 JACOB L. NACKENOFF, Primary Examiner

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1560734 *May 29, 1922Nov 10, 1925Leroy W ReeseApparatus for laying concrete
US2025703 *Mar 5, 1932Dec 31, 1935Gage Robert BApparatus for consolidating plastic materials by means of a vibrating roller
US2039078 *Oct 8, 1931Apr 28, 1936August HertwigMeans for consolidating the ground
US2094910 *Aug 17, 1933Oct 5, 1937William Baily RobertApparatus for compacting and surfacing plastic material
US3048089 *Aug 18, 1959Aug 7, 1962Bomag Bopparder Machinenbau GeLand roller for rolling road surfaces and the like
US3342118 *May 26, 1966Sep 19, 1967Bernhard BeierleinTamping device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4431336 *Feb 8, 1982Feb 14, 1984Nightengale Stanley AConcrete prefinishing tool
US4614486 *Nov 7, 1984Sep 30, 1986Bruno BragagniniPortable apparatus for compacting and leveling a poured floor
US4712943 *Apr 4, 1985Dec 15, 1987Yngve AlvarssonMethod and machine for levelling concrete when casting large concrete areas
US5417517 *Apr 14, 1993May 23, 1995Zollers; Ralph W.Vibrating tamping float
US6350083 *May 3, 1999Feb 26, 2002Tod PaladeniPowered roller screed
US6402425 *Feb 17, 2000Jun 11, 2002Tod PaladeniPowered roller screed having a split drive tube
Classifications
U.S. Classification404/113, 404/117
International ClassificationE01C19/41, E01C19/22
Cooperative ClassificationE01C19/41
European ClassificationE01C19/41