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Publication numberUS3515043 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 2, 1970
Filing dateFeb 6, 1969
Priority dateFeb 6, 1969
Publication numberUS 3515043 A, US 3515043A, US-A-3515043, US3515043 A, US3515043A
InventorsAustin Harold J
Original AssigneeAustin Harold J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Concrete compacting and finishing apparatus
US 3515043 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N H. J. AUSTIN 3,515,043

CONCRETE COMPACTING *AND FINISHING APPARATUS June 2, 1970 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 6; 1969 INVENTOR #42040 J. Adar/N Irma/v0 H. J. AUSTIN 3,515,043

CONCRETE COMPACTING AND FINISHING APPARATUS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 June 2, 1970 Filed Feb. 6, 1969 I NVENTOR. M42042 J fluamv United States Patent Olfioe 3,515,043 Patented June 2, 1970 3,515,043 CONCRETE COMPACTING AND FINISHING APPARATUS Harold J. Austin, 1360 Acacio Ave., San Bernardino, Calif. 92405 Filed Feb. 6, 1969, Ser. No. 797,150 Int. Cl. E01c 19/30 US. C]. 94-48 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A compact, lightweight, portable apparatus, which when moved across the surface of a freshly poured body of concrete, concurrently vibrates the concrete, forces aggregate therein near the concrete surface a predetermined distance downwardly therein, compacts the concrete by eliminating voids and air bubbles present therein, which in turn causes water and fines in said concrete to rise to the surface thereof to impart a desired texture to the concrete.

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION Concrete Vibrating and Finishing Machine filed by Harold J. Austin on Oct. 14, 1968, under Ser. No. 767,103.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention An apparatus for concurrently compacting and finishing the surface of a body of freshly poured concrete to a desired texture as the apparatus is moved thereover.

Description of the prior art Prior to devising the invention disclosed in copending application Ser. No. 767,103, it was common practice to compact freshly poured concrete by manually tamping the same and then finishing the surface of the tamped concrete to a desired texture. From an operational standpoint it was found that such tamping was not only slow and thereby expensive, but at no time was there any assurance that aggregate in the concrete would be forced downwardly therein a predetermined distance from the surface, and that fines and water in low water content concrete would rise to the surface to the extent that a smooth surface could be imparted to the finished concrete surface.

The present invention overcomes the disadvantages of earlier tamping methods by providing a portable, lightweight apparatus adapted for use in concurrently vibrating and compacting freshly poured concrete to eliminate voids present therein, but which finishes the concrete to a desired texture SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An apparatus including forwardly and rearwardly disposed fioat assemblies between which a vertically adjustable, hollow, perforated roller is situated. These assemblies and roller are concurrently vibrated as they are moved over the surface of a body of freshly poured concrete. The roller forces aggregate in the concrete to a desired distance below the surface. The vibration imparted to the concrete by the assemblies compact the same to eliminate water and fines to rise to the surface where the float assemblies can impart a desired texture to the concrete when in contact therewith.

A major object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus, which when moved over the surface of a freshly poured body of concrete compacts the same, forces aggregate therein to a desired distance below the surface thereof and causes fines and water in the concrete to rise to the surface, which thereby imparts a desired texture thereto.

Another object of the invention is to furnish an apparatus for rapidly and conveniently compacting and finishing concrete without resorting to hand tamping.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide an apparatus by which concrete can be compacted and finished more uniformly than by previously available equipment and methods, with a substantial saving in manpower.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide an apparatus by which concrete can be compacted and finished more uniformly than by previously available equipment and methods, with a substantial saving in manpower.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the apparatus of the present invention;

FIG. '2 is a transverse cross-sectional view of the apparatus, taken on the line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is the same view shown in the upper portion of FIG. 2, but with a cover plate normally provided on the engine, removed to disclose the eccentrically loaded driven body;

FIG. 4 is a transverse cross-sectional view of the apparatus wherein the forward float assembly has been adjusted whereby the plate thereof contacts the concrete surface disposed at a forward and upwardly extending angle relative thereto;

FIG. 5 is the same view as that shown in FIG. 4, but in which the angular positions of the forward and rear float assemblies are reversed;

FIG. 6 is a bottom plan view of the apparatus; and

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary top plan view of the apparatus illustrating the manner in which the handle is adjustably connected thereto.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The apparatus A, as may best be seen in FIG. 1, includes an open frame B that pivotally supports a forward float assembly C and rear float assembly D. A vertically adjustable, hollow, perforated roller E is rotatably supported from the frame B between the float assemblies C and D. An engine F is rigidly secured to frame B, and drives an eccentrically loaded body G. When the eccentric G is rotated, the frame B, float assemblies C and D, and roller E are concurrently vibrated.

A lever H is pivotally supported from the rear center portion of frame -B, and an elongate handle I extends rearwardly from this handle. Float assemblies B and C are pivotally connected by a first elongate member K. A second elongate member L pivotally connects the forward float assembly C to lever H. The handle I is not only used to move and guide the apparatus A over the surface 10 of a body of freshly poured concrete M, but by upward and downward movement of the rear extremity thereof, the lever H may be pivoted to adjust the positions of the float assemblies C and D to any desired angular relationship, as shown in FIGS. 2, 4 or 5.

The detailed structure of the apparatus A is described as follows. Frame B includes two parallel, laterally spaced side pieces 12 that are connected by two spaced cross members 14, as may best be seen in FIG. 1. An elongate rectangular sheet 16 is incorporated in the forward float assembly C and two supports 18 extend upwardly from i the ends of this sheet. A lip 20 projects upwardly from jects upwardly from substantially the center of sheet 16, as best seen in FIGS. 1 and 2.

The rear float assembly D is of the same structure as that of float assembly C. The elements comprising float assembly D are identified in the drawings by the same identifying numerals used for like elements in the float assembly C, but to which primes have been added.

The supports 18 and 18' are pivotally connected to side pieces 12 by pins or bolts 26 and 26, respectively. The rear float assembly D (FIG. 2) occupies a position on frame B which is the reverse of that occupied by the forward float assembly C. Due to this reverse positioning the lips 22 and 22 are adjacently disposed. The upper sheets 16 and 16 are reinforced by a number of ribs 28 and 28', as shown in FIG. 1.

Roller E is defined by a cylindrical shell 28 of rigid material in which spaced openings 29 are formed. Reticulated metal may be conveniently used for the shell 28. The openings 29 are of small cross section than that of the aggregate (not shown) used in the body of concrete M so that the aggregate will be forced downwardly a predetermined distance from the concrete surface as the apparatus A is moved thereover.

Two circular plates 30 are mounted in the ends of shell 28 which rotatably engage a shaft 32. The ends of shaft 32 are exteriorly threaded (not shown). The ends of shaft 32 extend through vertical slots (not shown) pro vided in side pieces 12, and then through bores (not shown) formed in two roller-adjusting levers 34 that are pivotally supported from side pieces 12 by pins 36, as illustrated in FIG. 1. The threaded ends of the shaft 32 project from the adjusting levers 34, and are engaged by nuts 38.

Each adjusting lever 34 has a bore (not shown) provided in the forward portion thereof through which a bolt or pin may be extended to engage any desired one of a number of veritcally spaced openings 42 formed in the side pieces 12 most adjacent thereto. The bolts 40 are used to hold the levers 34 at positions where the lower extremity of roller E is disposed a desired distance below the sheets 16 and 16 when the sheets are substantially parallel, in the manner shown in FIG. 2.

An inverted U-shaped bracket 46 is secured to, and extends between cross members 14. Bracket 46 serves as a support for the engine F. Engine F may be a small internal combustion engine as illustrated in the drawings, or an electric motor (not shown), if desired. Engine F has a drive shaft 48 on which an eccentric weighted body G is mounted (FIG. 3). The eccentric G is preferably disposed within a housing 52 provided with a cover plate 54 which is removably secured thereto. When the engine F is in operation, vibrations therefrom are transmitted through bracket 46 to frame B, and from the frame to the roller E and float assemblies C and D.

First member K includes a turnbuckle 56 to which for-' ward and rear rods 58 and 60, respectively, are threadedly connected. The rods and 60 are also pivotally connected to the upper portions of arms 24 and 24' respectively, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. Rotation of the turnbuckle 56 permits angular adjustment of the float assemblies C and D relative to one another. Two brackets 62 and 62' project from the cross members 14 (FIG. 2), and support pins 64 and 64'. The pins 64 and 64 pivotally support the arms 24 and 24', and are in coaxial alignment with the sets of bolts 26 and 26'.

A bracket 66 extends upwardly and rearwardly from cross member (FIG. 2). A pin 68 projects from bracket 66 that pivotally supports the lever H, which is of L-shaped transverse cross section, as shown in FIG. '7. The lever H supports a casting 72 that has a first toothed face 74 defined thereon. A second toothed face 78 is defined on the forward end 76 of handle I. A screw 80 extends through casting 72 and end 76. The screw 80 is engaged by a wing nut 82, and when this nut is tightened on screw 80, the first and second toothed faces 74 and 78, respectively, are forced into engagement, whereby handle I is held in a fixed non-rotatable position relative to lever H. Second member L, as may best be seen in FIG. 2, is pivotally connected to the upper ends of lever H and arm 24. An inverted U-shaped handle N extends upwardly from the rear cross member 14, and is used in carrying the apparatus A.

The apparatus A is most easy to use. By loosening the wing nut 82, the handle I may be angularly positioned to place the rear extremity thereof (not shown) at a convenient height for the user (not' shown). Engine F is then actuated, and by use of handle I the apparatus A may be moved across the body of freshly poured concrete. Vibrations generated by rotation of the eccentric G are transmitted to the concrete through the float assemblies C and D and roller E. The vibrations serve to compact the body of concrete by causing air entrained in bubbles therein to escape from the concrete. The vibrations also cause fines and water to rise to the surface of the body of concrete M. The roller E extends downwardly below the float assemblies C and D, and a a result, aggregate near the surface 10 is forced downwardly into the concrete a predetermined distance. This distance is determined by the setting of the roller adjustment levers 34.

When the rear extremity (not shown) of handle I is moved downwardly, the lever H is pivoted in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG 4, with the forward float assembly C tilting upwardly and forwardly and the sheet 16' in full sliding engagement with the surface 10. By moving the rear extremity (not shown) of handle I upwardly, the positions of the float assemblies C and D are reversed, as illustrated in FIG. 6. Upward and downward movement of handle I imparts a desired texture and finish to the concrete surface 10.

As this invention may be embodied in several forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof, the present embodiment is simply illustrative. Also, since the scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims, all changes falling within the metes and bounds of the claims, or that provide their functional as well as conjointly cooperative equivalents are therefore intended to be embraced by these claims.

Iclaim:

1. An apparatus, which when moved over the surface of a body of freshly poured concrete containing aggregate, compacts said concrete and finishes the surface thereof to a desired texture, which apparatus comprises:

(a) a frame including two spaced, parallel side pieces connected by forward and rear cross members;

(b) a hollow cylindrical roller disposed between said cross members and parallel thereto, in which roller a plurality of spaced openings are formed that are sufficiently small in cross section that said aggregate cannot pass therethrough;

(c) first means for rotatably supporting said roller from said side pieces;

(d) forward and rear float assemblies supported between said side pieces forwardly and rearwardly of said cross members for slidably contacting said concrete surface as said apparatus moves thereover;

(e) power-drive vibration-generating means operatively associated with said frame for concurrently vibrating said roller and said forward and rear float assemblies; and

(f) an elongate handle extending rearwardly from said frame by which said apparatus is guided and moved over said concrete surface to permit said roller to force that portion of said aggregate near said concrete surface downwardly therein and to impart vibrations to said concrete through said forward and rear float assemblies and to permit said roller to compact said concrete and thereby eliminate voids therein, with said vibrations so imparted to said concrete causing water and fines therein to rise to said surface where the same are slidably contacted by said float assemblies to impart a finish to said concrete surface. 2. An apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said first means further includes:

(g) two elongate levers pivotally supported from said side pieces, which levers are parallel thereto; (h) a shafting extending between said levers that rotatably supports said rollers; and (i) fastening means for holding said levers at any one of a plurality of predetermined positions relative to said frame to dispose the lower portion of said roller at a desired distance below said frame, which distance determines the depth said aggregate will be forced downwardly into said concrete from said surface 'when said apparatus moves over said surface. 3. An apparatus as defined in claim 1 which further includes:

(g) second means for pivotally connecting said forward and rear float assemblies; and -(h) third means for pivoting said forward float assembly, with said second and third means cooperatively serving to disposed said forward and rear float assemblies at desired angular positions relative to said frame as said apparatus is moved over said concrete whereby said concrete surface may be finished to a predetermined texture. 4. An apparatus as defined in claim 3 wherein said second means further includes:

(i) two arms extending upwardly from said forward and rear float assemblies; and (j) a first elongate member pivotally connected to upper end portions of said arms.

5. An apparatus as defined in claim 4 wherein said first elongate member is further defined by! (k) a turnbuckle; and

(1) forward and rear threaded rods which engage said turnbuckle and are pivotally connected on their free ends to said arms, with said turnbuckle when rotated moving said rods to establish a desired angular relationship between said forward and rear float assemblies.

6. An apparatus as defined in claim 4 wherein said third means further includes:

(k) anelongate lever pivotally supported from a rearwardly disposed position on said frame; and

(l) a second elongate member pivotally connected to said elongate lever and to said arm on said forward float assembly.

7. An apparatus as defined in claim 6 wherein a forward end of said handle is secured to said elongate lever and extends rearwardly therefrom.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,665,054 4/1928 Carr 94-48 X 2,252,188 8/ 1941 Krehbiel 94-45 2,333,041 10/1943 Poulter 94-45 2,5 82,199 1/ 1952 Gardner 94-50 3,046,856 7/ 1962 Baxter 94-48 3,119,314 1/ 1964 Schiel 94-50 3,224,348 12/ 1965 Maginniss 94-48 3,338,144 8/1967 \Hart 94-48 NILE C. BYERS, 112., Primary Examiner

Patent Citations
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US1665054 *May 21, 1923Apr 3, 1928Lakewood Engineering CompanyFinishing machine
US2252188 *Oct 5, 1938Aug 12, 1941Krehbiel Benjamen FPlastic concrete surfacing machine
US2333041 *May 7, 1941Oct 26, 1943Koehring CoConcrete treating and finishing machine
US2582199 *Jan 24, 1947Jan 8, 1952Gardner Byrne Construction ComRoller-type aggregate compacting device
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3997278 *Mar 2, 1976Dec 14, 1976Wacker-Werke KgVibration tamper device
US4142815 *Nov 28, 1977Mar 6, 1979Mitchell David CConcrete slab striker
US4431336 *Feb 8, 1982Feb 14, 1984Nightengale Stanley AConcrete prefinishing tool
US4702640 *Jul 23, 1986Oct 27, 1987Allen Engineering CorporationRotating tube concrete finisher
US4722638 *Jan 22, 1987Feb 2, 1988Morrison Donald RScreen with frontal distribution unit
US5870960 *Sep 30, 1997Feb 16, 1999Capel IncorporatedLooptaker driving arrangement and method for zig-zag sewing machines
US6224293Apr 19, 1999May 1, 2001Compaction America, Inc.Variable amplitude vibration generator for compaction machine
US7544012Jan 15, 2008Jun 9, 2009Lura Enterprises, Inc.Power roller screed with multiple screed rollers
US7704012May 19, 2009Apr 27, 2010Lura Enterprises, Inc.Power roller screed with multiple screed rollers
US7959374Apr 2, 2010Jun 14, 2011Lura Enterprises, Inc.Power roller screed with circular pour attachment
US8596905 *Jun 7, 2010Dec 3, 2013John Scott StephensApparatus and method for applying additives to a concrete mix
US8714873 *May 1, 2012May 6, 2014John Scott StephensApparatus and method for applying additives to a concrete mix
US20070134064 *Dec 9, 2005Jun 14, 2007Dennis LuraArticulating reversible power screed with a varying length roller
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US20090226258 *May 19, 2009Sep 10, 2009Lura Enterprises, Inc.Power roller screed with multiple screed rollers
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Classifications
U.S. Classification404/113, 404/117
International ClassificationE01C19/41, E01C19/22
Cooperative ClassificationE01C19/41
European ClassificationE01C19/41