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Publication numberUS3515348 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 2, 1970
Filing dateJul 22, 1968
Priority dateJul 22, 1968
Publication numberUS 3515348 A, US 3515348A, US-A-3515348, US3515348 A, US3515348A
InventorsWilliam H Coffman Jr
Original AssigneeLewbill Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mist-producing device
US 3515348 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1970 w. H. COFFMAN, JR 3,515,348

MIST-PRODUCING DEVICE Filed July 22, 1968 [NYE/V rae WILL moi h. CorFM4/v,J.

nrmwvzs United States Patent M 3,515,348 MET-PRODUCING DEVICE William H. Colfman, J12, Mount Pleasant, Pa., assignor to Lewbill Industries Inc., Scottdale, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed July 22, 1968, Ser. No. 746,383 Int. Cl. Bb 1/28 U.S. Cl. 239-103 5 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A spray nozzle has a stern screwed into the outlet of a valve body flow passage, and a head that overlaps the adjacent end of the body. The nozzle stern extends through the rear wall of a drip cup that has a second wall extending forward beside the nozzle head. A portion of the rear wall is confined between the head and valve body. A drain tube extends away from the lowest part of the cup.

Liquid will not drip from a properly designed spray nozzle as long as it is operating as intended. However, in time, the nozzle orifice may become partly clogged by foreign particles or by a deposit from the liquid flowing through it. For example, one type of humidifier sprays a fine mist of water into a warm air furnace system to humidify the air. The mist evaporates and there is no dripping from the spray nozzle normally. Nevertheless, a particle of dirt, or lime or a mineral deposited out of the water, may eventually partly obstruct the nozzle orifice so that it does not function properly. When that occurs the nozzle will start to drip or drool, which may rust metal parts below the humidifier, or otherwise be objectionable.

It is among the objects of this invention to provide a mist-producing device, which collects its own drip and drains it to a safe place, which is easy to manufacture and assemble, which has an easily replaceable nozzle, and which requires only one opening in a wall to receive the device.

The preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side view of my device mounted in operating position, with parts broken away in section;

FIG. 2 is a view of the inner end, taken on the line II-II of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a cross section taken on the line III-III of FIG. 1.

My mist-producing device can be used anywhere it is desired to produce a mist from a fixed or adjustable position. If it is to spray a mist into a chamber or the like, the device can be mounted in a wall of the chamber. Referring to the drawings, the device includes a valve body 1 provided with a flow passage through it. To mount it in a wall 2, the central portion of the valve body is surrounded by an integral flange 3 provided with holes that receive screws 4, which fasten it to the wall around an opening that the body extends through. For a more stable mounting and to help hold the device in place while the screws are being inserted, it is preferred that the valve body also be encircled by an integral circular shoulder 5 directly in front of the flange, but smaller than the flange. This shoulder fits in the circular opening of the same size that has been cut in the wall.

The portion of the valve body outside the chamber preferably is inclined upwardly away from the wall and has a large internally threaded recess 8 in its upper or t Patented June 2, 1970 threaded opening 11 that extends out of one side of the valve body and forms the inlet for the flow passage. Screwed into recess 8 is one end of a solenoid coil 12 that contains a movable core 13 which normally rests against a valve seat 14 around the upper end of bore 9 to close the flow passage until the solenoid is energized to retract its core and thereby open the passage.

The lower end bore 9 connects with a third bore 16 that continues through the valve body to its inner end. Although the portion of the body inside the chamber could extend horizontally, it is preferred that it extend upwardly at an angle between about 320 and with bore 16 at the same angle. This helps to keep the water in the flow passage from dripping out of its inner end after the valve has been closed each time.

The inner end portion of the flow passage, which serves as its outlet, is enlarged and internally threaded to received the threaded stem 18 of a nozzle. Outside of the passage the nozzle has a head 19 that is larger than the stem and therefore overlaps the fiat end surface of the valve body around the passage outlet. The head may be provided with flats so that a wrench can be applied to it to screw the nozzle into and out of the valve body. The nozzle orifice generally will be designed to spray either a hollow or a solid cone of mist. A compressible washer 20 can be pressed between the inner end of the nozzle and the valve body to help prevent leakage, although the engaging screw threads may be sufficient.

When this device is operating properly, it will spray a mist into the chamber periodically and there will be no dripping or drooling of the nozzle. However, in time the nozzle orifice may become partly clogged by minute foreign particles or by deposits from the liquid passing through it, e.g. lime in the case of water. That will cause dripping or drooling so that drops of liquid will fall away from the nozzle, which can be highly undesirable in many cases. For example, if this device is used as a humidifier in connection with a warm air furnace, the walled chamber will be the chamber at the top of the furnace, or a warm air duct. Water under pressure will be delivered to the inlet 11 of the flow passage and will issue from the nozzle as a fine mist that will evaporate in the surrounding warm air. The solenoid is wired to operate in conjunction with the furnace fan control, whereby water mist will be produced in the furnace chamber only during periods when warm parched air is being distributed throughout the heating system so that the mist will be completely evaporated. Any solid water dripping from the nozzle could corrode the underlying metal parts of the furnace, and therefore should be avoided, which it is a feature of this invention to do.

Accordingly, a drain cup is provided that catches any drops of liquid and delivers them to some safe point outside the chamber. The cup, which may be made of copper, has a rear wall 22 and a wall 23 that extends forward beside the nozzle and is spaced laterally from it. The rear wall shown, which forms the bottom of the cup, is provided with a central opening, through which the nozzle stem extends to support the cup without the use of any other fastening means. The portion of the wall around the opening is confined between the head of the nozzle and the end face of the valve body. The head usually will press firmly against the bottom wall of the cup, but a tight clamping action is not required because the seal for the liquid flowing through the valve body is not formed in that area and the nozzle stem will support the cup anyway. The other or side wall 23 of the cup extends under the nozzle and preferably all around it. This wall may be perpendicular to the bottom wall or at a slight inclination to it. A light clamping action of the nozzle head on the rear wall of the cup will prevent Water from leaking out of the back of the cup around the nozzle.

It will be seen that any water dripping from the nozzle will be collected by the cup. In order to dispose of that water the lowest point of the cup is provided with an outlet port, to which one end of a drain tube 24 is connected. The tube carries the water downwardly and out of the furnace chamber to a plastic tube 25 that conducts the water to a point where it will do no harm. Another feature of this invention is that the drain tube does not require a second hole to be drilled thrOugh the chamber wall for the tube. Instead, it passes through the same opening 6 in which the humidifier is mounted. This is possible because the shoulder 5 and flange 3 are provided beneath the valve body with a pair of aligned holes 26 and 27, in which the tube fits snugly and through which it extends at an inclination. The tube is thus tied in with the valve body and the entire device can be inserted in a single wall opening. Furthermore, if the device is removed from the wall to replace a nozzle, the drain tube will support the drain cup While the nozzle is being replaced. There is no need to disturb the cup while a nozzle is being removed or inserted.

According to the provisions of the patent statutes, I have explained the principle of my invention and have illustrated and described what I now consider to represent its best embodiment. However, I desire to have it understood that, within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically illustrated and described.

I claim:

.1. A mist-producing device comprising a valve body having a flow passage therethrough provided with an inlet for liquid under pressure and also with an internally threaded enlarged outlet end portion adjacent said valve body and having a flat surface perpendicular to the flow axis of said outlet, a movable closure member normally closing said passage, a spray nozzle having a threaded stem screwed into said outlet end portion of the flow passage, the nozzle having a head overlapping the valve body around the adjacent end of the passage, a drip cup having a rear wall provided with an opening therethrough receiving said stem for supporting the cup, a portion of said wall being confined between said nozzle head and the flat surface of said outlet end portion, said cup also having a second wall extending from said rear wall forward beside said head and spaced laterally therefrom, the lowest part of the cup being provided with an outlet port, and a drain tube leading from said port back beneath the valve body.

2. A mist-producing device according to claim 1, including a substantially vertical flange surrounding said valve body integrally therewith and having holes through it to receive fasteners for attaching the flange to a support, and the flange being provided below said body with an opening through which said drain tube extends.

3. A mist-producing device according to claim 1, including a substantially vertical flange surrounding said valve body and having holes through it to receive fasteners for attaching the flange to a support, the flange being provided below said body with an opening through which said tube extends, a shoulder encircling said body and projecting forward from said flange to fit in an opening in the support, said shoulder being provided with an opening aligned with said flange opening and likewise receiving said tube.

4. The combination with a furnace warm air chamber having a substantially vertical side wall provided with an opening therein, of a humidifier comprising a valve body extending through said opening, means holding said body in said wall, the valve body having a flow passage therethrough provided at its outer end with an inlet for water under pressure, the portion of the passage inside said chamber being inclined inwardly and upwardly and having an internally threaded enlarged outlet end portion, the inner end of the valve body around said passage having a flat surface perpendicular to the axis of said outlet end portion, a movable closure member carried by the valve body for normally closing said passage, an incllned spray nozzle having a threaded stem screwed into said outlet end portion of the flow passage, the nozzle having a head overlapping said flat surface, a drip cup having an inclined bottom wall provided with a central opening therethrough receiving said stem for supporting the cup, a portion of said wall being confined between said nozzle head and flat surface, the cup also having a side wall surrounding the nozzle head and spaced laterally from it, the lowest part of the cup being rovided with an outlet port, and a drain tube connected at one end to the cup at said port and extending downwardly and outwardly through said chamber wall.

5. A mist-producing device according to claim 4, including a shoulder encircling the valve body and fitting in said chamber wall opening, and a flange surrounding said body in engagement with the outer surface of said wall around said opening, said holding means including fastening members extending through said flange and wall, and said shoulder and flange having aligned openings therethrough below said body receiving said tube.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,828,463 10/1931 Hammers 239l03 2,584,650 2/1952 Woodruif 239121 X 3,250,266 5/1966 Auringer 126-113 FOREIGN PATENTS 16,762 3/ 1891 Great Britain.

M. HENSON WOOD, JR., Primary Examiner M. Y. MAR, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 239121

Patent Citations
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US1828463 *Dec 6, 1929Oct 20, 1931Hammers Morgan JMeans for restricting atomized fluid discharge
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US3250266 *May 7, 1965May 10, 1966Daniel N AuringerAtomizer type humidifiers for use in heating plants such as furnaces and the like
GB189116762A * Title not available
Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification239/103, 261/116, 239/121, 261/DIG.150
International ClassificationB05B1/28, F24F6/12
Cooperative ClassificationB05B1/28, Y10S261/15, F24F6/12
European ClassificationF24F6/12, B05B1/28