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Publication numberUS3515389 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 2, 1970
Filing dateJun 19, 1967
Priority dateJun 19, 1967
Publication numberUS 3515389 A, US 3515389A, US-A-3515389, US3515389 A, US3515389A
InventorsWolfe Norman B
Original AssigneeWolfe Norman B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game club and ball of butyl rubber
US 3515389 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 2, 1970 N. B.'WOLFE 3,

I GAME CLUB AND BALL 0F BUTYL RUBBER Filed June 19, 1967 v I 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 IL lllllll ""illllllllllill llllllllllil:

NORMAN a. WOLFE June 2, 1970 N. B. WOLFE 5,

GAME CLUB AND BALL OF BUTYL RUBBER Filed June 19, 1967 3 Sheets-Sheet Z (H T4 PRv NORMAN B. WOLFE TTORNEYS June 2, 1970 N. B. WOLFE 3,515,389

GAME CLUB AND BALL OF BUTYL RUBBER Filed June 19, 1967 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 NORMAN B. WOLFE z/l/dwm,

United States Patent 3,515,389 GAME CLUB AND BALL 0F BUTYL RUBBER Norman B. Wolfe, Meade, Kans. 67864 Filed June 19, 1967, Ser. No. 647,130 Int. Cl. A63b 53/02, 53/06, 69/36 U.S. Cl. 273-193 3 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Numerous types of games are known to the prior art using a club member to strike a ball member according to a predetermined set of rules such as golf, tennis, baseball and the like. However, the prior art games are generally expensive to play, require costly equipment, and only a few having the required skill may become highly proficient. For example, the game of golf requires 1) a large expanse of land requiring high investment cost plus continuous maintenance; (2) special golf shoes, balls, and set of clubs; (3) loss in considerable time both in play and travel distance to the golf course playing area; (4) expensive lessons as the game is difficult to learn with much variance between the beginner and professional players; (5) play with those of similar ability as there is considerable advantage for physical stamina and skill not being a closely competitive sport between children, adults, and the elderly; and (6) separating the family for extended time periods as golf is too slow to be a family spectator sport.

It is obvious that many other sports such as tennis have many of the aforementioned disadvantages and generally, are not for complete family participation while requiring maximum physical exertion and skill without extreme variations in players due to health, age, and sex.

In a preferred embodiment of the structure of this invention, a new game structure is provided having a ball means and a club means, both constructed of a high energy absorbing material. More specifically, the club means includes a head means secured to one end of an elongated shank member which, in turn, is formed at its other end with a hand grip section. The head means is formed with a main body having a loft section, a terrain section, and a central threaded opening adapted to adjustably receive the one end of the shank member to vary the overall length of the club means. The terrain section is of a cylindrical shape extended substantially perpendicular to and laterally of the shank member and positioned a predetermined distance above a lowermost flat support surface of the main body. The loft section extends laterally and perpendicular on the opposite side of the shank member. The loft section is positioned adjacent the support surface and includes a projecting cylindrically shaped head portion. The outer impact surfaces of the loft section and the terrain section are extended substantially parallel to the shank member except that the head portion is adapted to releasably receive a cup member to provide an inclined impact surface. The threaded opening in the main body is of a substantial depth so as to selectively receive lead members therein to regulate the weight of the head means so as to provide additional force on impact with the ball means. The ball means is of a spherical shape Patented June 2, 1970 preferably constructed entirely of the high energy absorbing material and of a diameter to align its center with the axis of the cylindrical terrain section. The lower position of the loft section results in impact with the ball means below center resulting in a lifting or lofting thereof. The inclined cap member further lowers the impact point of the head means with the ball means for maximum lifting characteristics on impact.

In a preferred embodiment of this invention, a peg ball game is provided played with one or a plurality of players by the use of the energy absorbing ball means and club means on a predetermined course area. The ball means and club means are made of a high energy absorbing material whereby impact of the club means with the ball means results in a disproportionate small movement of the ball means relative to the energy and force applied thereto.-

The course area is laid out with a plurality of spaced tee members or starting positions each having a correspondingly numbered peg member anchored into the playing surface. It is preferred that five or six separate links (combination of a tee member and respective peg member) are positioned in the area with fish ponds, sand traps, planters, and other types of hazards used as desired. A score card member is used to record relative scores being the number of impacts with the ball means required to hit the peg member at each link. In playing the game, the following steps are used: (1) players can participate individually or on teams; (2) the tee members and peg members are set for consecutive play and a course par score is set for each link; (3) a pre-set course area is set out requiring certain paths to follow or obstacles to be hit for each individual link; (4) the players successively hit their respective ball means by the club means from the first tee member to the first peg member; (5) the strokes required to complete the first link for each player is recorded on the score card memher and may be compared to par; (6) the remaining links are successively completed as set forth in steps 4 and 5; and (7) the total scores are tabulated to find the winning player and his ability relative to the par total score for this course area. Other rules may be added to the game method as to following the terrain or lofting the ball means as required.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a new and novel peg ball means overcoming the abovementioned disadvantages of the prior art devices.

Another object of this invention is to provide a game structure having a ball means adapted to be struck by an elongated club means whereupon the ball means and a head portion of the club means are both made of a high energy absorbing material.

One other object of this invention is to provide a game structure having an elongated club means used to strike a ball means in order to reach a pre-determined position with these items made of a material whereupon the major portions of the energy and force applied to the ball means is absorbed resulting in a minimum movement of the ball means relative to the energy applied thereto.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a game structure including a club means having an elongated shank member adjustably attached to a head means whereupon the head means is provided with opposite impact sides operable to vary movement of a 'ball means to be struck thereby.

Still one other object of this invention is to provide a game structure having a club means provided with a high energy absorbing head means connected to an elongated shank member whereupon the club means is adapted to receive selectively one or more lead Weight members adapted to provide additional Weight to the elongated shank member and/or the head means and provide more force for hitting a ball means.

A further object of this invention is to provide a new and novel peg ball game usable by one or more persons in a manner similar to golf having a course area with a plurality of corresponding tee members and peg members whereupon the strokes needed to hit the tee members with a ball means is tabulated and compared to a par score and to the other players to determine both a winner and relative skill.

One further object of this invention is to provide a game structure that is simple to use, economical to manufacture, variable in usage, easy to store, and may be used by all ages.

Still, one further object of this invention is to provide a peg ball game which can be set up in a limited physical course area; provides a minimum amount of initial investment with very little replacement and maintenance cost involved; can be played by people of all ages and physical abilities on a substantially equal basis; includes rules which are easy to follow and understand; and provides a game requiring a maximum physical exertion thereby achieving substantial satisfaction and exercise therefrom.

Various other objects, advantages and features of the invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the following discussion, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing the peg ball method and means of this invention being used by a player upon a course area layout;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary elevational view of a ball means and a club means of the game structure of this invention;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary elevational View of the club means of this invention;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along lines 44 in FIG. 3 illustrating a removable cap member thereon in a spaced, detached position;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary elevational view of the club means of this invention having portions thereof broken away for clarity;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken along line 66 in FIG.

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary elevational view illustrating a terrain section of the club means of this invention;

FIG. 8 is an elevational rear view of the detachable cap member of the club means of this invention;

FIG. 9 is a. sectional view taken along line 99 in FIG. 5;

FIGS. 10, 11, and 12 are schematic diagrams illustrating the use and operation of the ball means and club means of the game structure of this invention; and

FIG. 13 is an elevational view of a score card member of the game structure of this invention.

The following is a discussion and description of preferred specific embodiments of the new peg ball means of this invention, such being made with reference to the drawings whereupon the same reference numerals are used to indicate the same or similar parts and/or structure. It is to be understood that such discussion and description is not to unduly limit the scope of the invention.

Referring to the drawings in detail and in particular.

to FIG. 1, an individual 15 is shown using a game structure of this invention on an outdoor course area. More particularly, the game structure includes an elongated club means 16 usable to strike a ball means 18 in a manner similar to striking a golf ball with considerable advantages and differences relative thereto.

The club means 16 includes an elongated shaft or shank member 19 having one end connected to an irregularly shaped impact hitting member or head means 21. The shank member 19 includes a shaft section 22 preferably constructed of a rigid material such as Wood, aluminum, steel, or the like having one end formed with a grip section 23 covered with a sure-grip rubber or leather covering. The shank member 19 is preferably of circular shape in transverse cross section tapering outwardly towards both ends from a thin midsection 25 to provide an attractive appearance thereto. The attachment end is formed with threads 26 so as to be mounted within a threaded opening 28 in the head means 21 and adjustably therein to regulate the overall length of the club means 16 to compensate for various physical sizes and desired stances of individual players. Additionally, the attachment end is formed with an elongated cylindrical opening 27 having its open end releasably closed by a threaded cap or insert 29. The opening 27 is adapted to receive a plurality of lead members 40 therein for reasons to be explained.

The head means 21 includes a main body 30 having an upright stem section 31 with oppositely extended loft section 33 and terrain section 35; a clamp member 36 mounted about the stem section 31; and a cap member 38 releasably connected to the loft section 33. The threaded opening 28, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, extends substantially the height of the stem section 31 and is adapted to receive a plurality of the lead members 40 therein. The clamp member 36 is operable to prevent unintentional axial movement in the threaded opening 28 and possible twisting of the head means 21 relative thereto on impact.

The lower portion of the main body 30 is formed with a fiat support surface 41 (FIG. 3) so that the club means 16 is self-supporting thereon for storage and other nonusage conditions. The outer edges of the support surface 41 are integral with curved sections 43 of a pre-determined radius R for reasons to be explained.

As best shown in FIGS. 2, 6 and 7, the terrain section 35 is of a cylindrical shape integral with and extended outwardly from the main body 30 and having an outer upright impact surface 45. The horizontal axis of the terrain section 35 is positioned at a distance equal to the radius R from a major portion of the curved sections 43 of the main body 39 for reasons to be explained. Additionally, the diameter of the terrain section 35 is made equal to the dimension R for ease and accuracy of play as will be explained.

As shown in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4, the loft section 33 includes a laterally extended impact portion formed with a laterally extended flange portion 46 adapted to receive the cap member 38 as will be explained. The impact portion is formed with an outer upright surface 47 extended substantially parallel to the shank member 19 adapted to hit the ball means 18. The cap member 38 is of a generally cylindrical shape having an inner stepped cavity portion 49 adapted to fit over the flange portion 46 of the loft section 33 in a frictionally engaging, clamped relationship thereto. The cap member 38 is formed with an outer impact surface 51 inclined relative to the axis of the loft section 33 so as to vary the results on impact with the ball means 18 as will be explained. It is obvious that the cap member 38 fits over the flange portion 46 in a snug relationship whereupon the same can be rotated about the axis of the loft section 33 as desired to regulate the resultant movement of the ball means 18. Additionally, it is noted that the lower support surface 41 of the main body 30 is formed with an arcuate cut-out section 52 extended upwardly so as to be positioned adjacent the flange portion 46. The arcuate section 52 is adapted to receive ones thumb or instrument for readily removing the cap member 38 from the loft section 33.

As shown in FIG. 2, the ball means or impact receiving member 18 is of a spherical shape and preferably constructed entirely of high energy absorbing material. However, it is obvious that the ball means 18 can be formed with a central core of wood, plastic, or the like with a heavy outer covering of the high energy absorbing material. The ball means 18 is preferably constructed of a radius equal to the dimension R so as to be readily compatible with the club means 16 as will be explained.

In regards to the ball means 18 and the head means 21 of the club means 16, the high energy absorbing material is preferably constructed of a butyl rubber compound having the desirable impact test resulting in an absorption of energy thereby failing to impart or transfer the full force from the head means 21 to the ball means 18 on impact. More specifically, the preferred material is of the polyisobutylene class such as a copolymer of isobutylene and isoprene manufactured under Bucar Butyl by Colombian Carbon Co., 380 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. Other similar compounds are known as Enjay Butyl manufactured by Enjay Chemical Co., 60 W. 49th St., New York, NY. and Enjay Butyl 268 has been found to be quite satisfactory. The dynamic spring rate and dampening effect of butyl rubber is most desirable in this application as the head means 21 and the ball means 18 absorb a large percentage of the impact force and slowly, relatively, return to their original shapes.

In the use and operation of the game structure of this invention, the ball means 18 may be struck by the club means 16 in numerous ways, namely, (1) by impact of the terrain section 35 therewith; (2) by impact by the loft section 33 with the ball means 18; or (3) by impact of the cap member 38 against the ball means 18 (FIGS. -12, inclusive). More specifically, it is noted that the axis of the cylindrical portion of the terrain section 35 is positioned a distance from the curved section 43 of the main body 30 equal to the radius R of the ball means 18. Therefore, as the club means 16 is inclined relative to the playing surface substantially similar to the use of a golf club, it is obvious that the axis of the terrain section 35 and the center of the ball means 18 are aligned whereupon impact with the ball means 18 results in movement thereof in a horizontal path in continuous contact with the playing surface.

As shown in FIG. 11, the loft section is positioned substantially below the center of the ball means whereupon on impact therewith, the center or impact position on the ball means 18 is below and angularly inclined relative to the center of the ball means 18 thereby resulting in a lifting movement of the ball means 18 so as to cover a greater distance relative to the playing surface. On attaching the cap member 38 to the loft section 33, it is seen that the outer inclined surface 51 of the cap member 38 additionally operates to impact the ball means 18 even further below the center relative to the loft section 33 resulting in even a greater upward lifting or lofting of the ball means 18 upon impact. Additionally, it is obvious that the cap member 38 can be rotated relative to the loft section 33 to provide a plurality of various results on impacting the ball means 18 and to compensate for the angular relationship of the shank member 19 relative to the playing surface and the various stances and angles of impact of the ball means 18 by individual players.

On impact of the head means 21 with the ball means 18, the main body 30 is flexible relative to the integral stem section 31 thereby adding to the energy absorbing characteristics of the butyl rubber material being used. It is obvious that the stem section 31 can be varied in thickness to increase or decrease the resultant flexibility.

In the use of the game structure of this invention and the method of playing the peg ball game therewith, a course area, indicated generally at 55 in FIG. 1, is laid out as desired and consists of a plurality of tee members 57 and a corresponding plurality of numerical markers or peg members 59. The corresponding pairs of tee members 57 and peg members 58, hereinafter referred to as links, are set up in a predetermined manner so that each player can successively follow them as from tee No. 1 to tee No. 2, etc. This course area 55 is preferably set up with numerous obstacles such as sandtraps 61, tree members 62, fences 64, and planters 66 as desired. It is seen, therefore that, the course area 55 is substantially similar to a golf course except that a predetermined general path may be set up with a certain obstacle, such as the planter box 66, which may have to be hit on the path towards a given peg member 59 depending on a particular set of rules set up for a given course area 55 and corresponding game. The method of this game may be played by one or a plurality of players, each having a corresponding ball means 18 and club means 16 whereby the ball means 18 may be of different colors so as to be readily distinguishable from others. On setting up the course area 55, the various links are judged according to difiiculty in regards to the traps and paths to be followed and each link is assigned a predetermined number of strokes that should be required and such is noted as par score 67. This par score 67 is indicated on a score card member 65, as shown in FIG. 13, so that the individual players score may be compared not only to anothers score but also as to the course par score 67 to indicate a players relative skill thereto.

In the method of playing the peg ball game of this invention, the following steps are taken: (1) the individual players may be divided up into teams or each can play individually as desired; (2) a first player may be ascertained as by the flipping of a coin or the like and, if teams are used, the players alternate in stepping forward to the tee member.57 of the No. 1 link whereupon the ball means 18 is placed thereupon and the first player proceeds to strike the same towards the first peg member 59; (3) the next and succeeding players follow suit in placing the respective ball means 18 upon the first tee member 57 and striking the same with their club means 16 in the desired direction and velocity; (4) the players then proceed in order tostrike their respective ball means 18 as required to hit the No. 1 peg member 59; (5) the score or number of impacts with the ball means 18 required to hit No. 1 peg member 59 is thereupon recorded upon the score card member 65 in an appropriate one of the boxes 68 relative to the corresponding link and player member; (6) the players then proceed to link No. 2 and follow the aforementioned steps 2 to 5, inclusive, and such is successively followed until all of the links have been played; (7) certain obstacles or requirements may be used such as moving the ball means 18 around the upright tree member 62 and striking the fence 64 before proceeding to the No. 8 peg member 59 therefore providing additional excitement and. skill required for the game; (8) during play of the game, the players may be allowed to use the cap members 38 or not as desired or, in some instances, the game may be declared a ter rain game only whereupon the terrain section 35 only can be used to strike the ball means 18 thereby keeping the same in contact with the ground surface and making it extremely difiicult to cross over the sandtrap 61 and the like; and (9) the total scores are added for all the links for each respective individual player and entered into respective total boxes 70 as shown on the score card member 65 and the same as compared to a course par score 72 and to each other whereupon the person with the lowest total score is declared the winner and his relative skill may be compared to the course par score 72.

It is obvious that the shock-absorbing, high energy absorbing material of the club means 16 and the ball means 18 is operable whereby the ball means 18 may be struck by the club means 16 with a full force swing thereby providing the utmost in exertion by the individual players in forcefully striking the ball means 18. However, because of the energy absorbing material, the ball means 18 does not travel a great or expected distance relative to the force applied thereto. Therefore, it is seen that the game means of this invention may be played within a small total course area making the same readily playable in ones back yard, vacant field, or the like.

The player may or may not, depending 'on the par-' 7 28 in the head means 21 to compensate for differences in player skill or for achieving the proper feel in the club means 16-. The addition of numerous Weights in the head means 21 would result in more flexibility of the main body relative to the stem sections 31 to achieve the players desires.

The peg ball means of this invention is a highly desirable game in some aspects similar to the game of golf and the physical motions of the upper extremities and mental concentration required is substantially identical. However, the peg ball game of this invention has numerous advantages thereover which are highly desirable. For example, the ball means are substantially larger than a golf ball and can be readily hit by persons of all ages and relative skill. Additionally, the difierences of skill and play between male adults, females, or children is not sufficiently great so as to make the competition therebetween noninteresting. Also, it is obvious that a small overall playing area is required for this game and the same may be set up on a commercial basis similar to miniature golf and can be played by those not desiring the tremendous amount of physical walking and continuous exertion required in other sports. Additionally, it is obvious that the peg ball means of this invention can be played as a night game as only a small area need be lighted and the ball means travels a very limited distance although hit with full force and, because of its size, may be easily found. It is noted that the club means of this invention may be altered by the addition of lead weights to either the shank means and/ or the head means so as to equalize the players relative ability according to physical stamina, age, health, etc. Additionally, by use of the plurality of impact faces on the club means, it is seen that the variations in the game may be played so as to equalize relative skill whereas one player may be allowed ,to use the loft section whereas a superior player may be limited to using only the terrain section. It is also seen that the peg ball game of this invention can be set up in asmall area and can also be readily played by a plurality of neighborhood persons in a manner similar to croquet but allowing maximum physical exertion and mental emotion similar to golf and therefore is much more exciting and desirable than the game of croquet.

As will be apparent from the foregoing description of preferred specific embodiments of the applicants peg ball means, a relatively simple and inexpensive game structure has been provided which is easily playable by persons of all ages for maximum physical exertion and enjoyment. It is obvious that the game structure of this invention requires a minimum of initial capital and investment and is very durable making the same a relatively inexpensive family sport whereby all persons can participate without driving to remote areas and having expensive equipment needed to play the game. Also the relative simplicity of the peg ball strutcure does not necessitate the use of expensive professional lessons therefor as the same can be readily learned by practice as the large size ball means relative to the club means assures an impact therewith almost every time.

The following invention has been described in connection with preferred specific embodiments thereof, and it will be understood that this description is intended to illustrate and not to limit the scope of the invention which is defined by the following claims.

I claim:

1. A game means playable by one or more persons comprising:

(a) club means having a shank portion secured to an impact hitting portion,

(b) said impact hitting portion constructed of a butyl rubber compound having relatively high energy absorbing characteristics,

(c) an impact receiving member constructed of a butyl rubber compound having relatively high energy absorbing characteristics adapted to be struck by said hitting portion to result in a minimum distance movement of said receiving member proportionate to energy applied thereto, the same being absorbed by both said hitting portion and said receiving member,

(d) said impact hitting portion having a head section with an integral upright stem action connected to said shank member, and

(e) a cap member releasably connected to said head section having an outer inclined surface relative to the axis of said head section operable to convert an upright impact surface on said head section to an inclined surface to achieve more lift on impact with said receiving member.

2. A game means as described in claim 1, including:

(a) said head section having an outer flange portion mounted within a cavity portion in said cap member whereby the same is readily releasable from said head section for usage of said upright impact surface.

3. A game means playable by one or more persons comprising:

(a) club means having a shank portion secured to an impact hitting portion,

(b) said impact hitting portion constructed of high energy absorbing rubber comprising a polymer of isobutylene and having an integral stem section connected to said shank portion so that the main body of said impact hitting portion is flexible relative to said stem section thereby adding to the energy absorbing characteristics of said butyl rubber,

(c) an impact receiving member of butyl rubber compound comprising a polymer of isobutylene to provide the maximum in energy absorption on impact between the said impact hitting portion and said impact receiving member, and

(d) said impact hitting portion having a projecting portion with a hitting face, the plane of said hitting face being substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of said shank portion, and having an opposite projecting portion with an impact face inclined upwardly toward said shank portion.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,064,916 6/1913 Kelly et al. 273 173 X 1,222,770 4/1917 Kaye.

1,567,765 12/1925 Spaulding. 2,364,955 12/1944 Diddell. 3,211,455 10/1965 Hyden 273*7s 3,260,525 7/1966 Ortel 273-168 X 827,658 7/1906 'Paddock 237-67 1,548,068 8/1925 Sullivan 273-56 x 1,617,243 2/1927 Flanagan 273 67 x 3,429,576 2/1969 Ikeda 27380.1 X

FOREIGN PATENTS 320,273 10/1929 Great Britain.

GEORGE J. MARLO, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,515,389 June 2, 1970 Norman B. Wolfe It is certified that error appears in the above identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column line 56, "strwtcure" should read structure Column 8, line 13, "action" should read section line 31, after "absorbing" insert butyl Signed and sealed this 5th day of January 1971.

(SEAL) Attest:

Edward M. Fletcher, Jr.

Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents WILLIAM E. SCHUYLER, IR.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3743297 *Jun 5, 1972Jul 3, 1973Dennis EGolf swing practice club
US3940145 *Feb 28, 1974Feb 24, 1976Gentiluomo Joseph AGolf ball
US4026561 *May 1, 1975May 31, 1977Baldorossi Blanche NGolf game apparatus
US4185824 *Jul 11, 1977Jan 29, 1980Ramtek CorporationBall launcher with finger spin loading
US4660834 *Jan 13, 1986Apr 28, 1987Carrigan Andrew JShort golf course and golf ball
US5060956 *May 17, 1990Oct 29, 1991Glass Philip ELawn game
US5458335 *Nov 24, 1993Oct 17, 1995Hattori; NoriyasuCombined putter and wedge golf club
US5863265 *Oct 29, 1997Jan 26, 1999Acton; Mark R.Field game
US6045453 *Sep 1, 1998Apr 4, 2000Jenkins; Robert E.Golf clubhead for putting or chipping the golfball
US7625295Jan 23, 2007Dec 1, 2009Ernesto GutierrezWeighted trainer golf club
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/256, 473/280, 473/412
International ClassificationA63B59/00, A63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B59/00, A63B69/3632, A63B2208/12
European ClassificationA63B69/36D2, A63B59/00